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Author Topic Next Topic: Sierra West Donkey Repair Yard:
Page: of 42

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 09/01/2019 :  3:06:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Excellent! Certainly looks like itís seen better days.




Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/01/2019 :  8:28:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Excellent! Certainly looks like itís seen better days.



. Thank you Michael


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2019 :  4:30:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Came back to do some engine shed detail, and found some drifters who rode in to see the old building. I should put up a 'private property' sign, I guess. They didn't stay long. But I was a biker for many decades, so I totally understand.

So, while they were visiting, I decided to make a grinding wheel. I have a couple of metal cast ones, and not really wanting to use them, and also really itching for a long time to make my own, I decided this was the next detail, a grinding wheel.

It wasn't complicated, when you break it down, just a little time consuming, most of that time just thinking about it. So first, I cut a couple of styrene tubing down to .08" wide, one was a little over a 1/4" I/d, the other just under. I mixed up a little plaster and filled in the inside of each, and let that dry overnight. Meanwhile, I cut some 3" thick or .04", stripwood, for the 'box', and some 8" x 10" for the 'feet'. I ended up cutting some more of the .04" to go on the bottom to give it a little more height after it was finished.

I was on the fence as to use brass or styrene for the next step. Using styrene, I would have to drill some holes into the ends, and glue small sections up to make the handle, but with brass, I could avoid all that if I had the right sizes that would fit inside each other. So, 10 minutes of thinking later, I opted for the brass method.

I had some, I believe, K&S .032" and .047" brass tubing, along with some .019" wire. I blackened each before cutting, but the .019" would be the handle, the .032" (which has an I/d of .02") would go through the wheel, and a small bit for the handle, and the .047" would be for the pillow blocks for the .032" tubing. The blocks would be glued down with ACC to some .04" wide brass strips, giving a fuller look. The brass strip was glued to the box top.

The photos should explain the sequence pretty well, but gluing most parts together and still have the handle move wasn't too hard to do. Yes, the handle does turn. But the wheel doesn't turn with it, but does turn, so I really need to glue the 'plaster' stone wheel to the main rod.

Otherwise, I love it. I showed a casting next to it for comparison.






















Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 09/08/2019 4:34:36 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/08/2019 :  6:20:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah!! The man of many details great looking grinding wheel Tony.

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 11510 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 09/08/2019 :  7:04:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cool detail Tony. Nice.

What plaster did you use, Hydrocal or Plaster of Paris?



Country: USA | Posts: 3398 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2019 :  9:18:56 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Ah!! The man of many details great looking grinding wheel Tony.



Thank you Jerry


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2019 :  9:20:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Cool detail Tony. Nice.

What plaster did you use, Hydrocal or Plaster of Paris?



Thanks Carl, I used plaster of paris


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2019 :  9:45:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All you need is the AX to grind 'cause that rolling stone will get the job done. Seriously, nice job on the grindstone.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5194 Go to Top of Page

brownbr
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 09/09/2019 :  06:31:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yours looks better than the casting for sure.

Bryan

Country: USA | Posts: 1514 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2019 :  08:17:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice detail, Tony. Youíre certainly keeping your nose to the grindstone.


Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2019 :  5:32:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

All you need is the AX to grind 'cause that rolling stone will get the job done. Seriously, nice job on the grindstone.

Bob



Thanks Bob, I think I might have one. If not, I can probably make one


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2019 :  5:34:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by brownbr

Yours looks better than the casting for sure.



Thank you Bryan


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2019 :  5:35:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by brownbr

Yours looks better than the casting for sure.



Thank you Bryan


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2019 :  5:37:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Very nice detail, Tony. Youíre certainly keeping your nose to the grindstone.



Ainít that the truth


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/12/2019 :  10:15:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice detail construction and how-to Tony. You have the niche to continue to amaze. Keep it coming.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4103 Go to Top of Page
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