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Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/25/2018 :  11:44:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In yesterday's post (second picture), the rafter ends of the side addition, where they meet the bottom of the top peak slope, appear not to be in alignment with some of their neighboring rafters.
Upon seeing your addition of the purlins later in the post, all seems to work out well, and all seem to be in perfect alignment. If your building is perfectly square, and your rafters are cut to the same length, this isn't a problem.
I had a problem doing this when I built my critter engine shed, but eliminated problems in alignment, by placing a steel ruler (like you did in one of your pictures), next to each successive purlin. Makes perfect sense.
Thanks for your great tutorials.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4103 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/26/2018 :  5:26:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

In yesterday's post (second picture), the rafter ends of the side addition, where they meet the bottom of the top peak slope, appear not to be in alignment with some of their neighboring rafters.
Upon seeing your addition of the purlins later in the post, all seems to work out well, and all seem to be in perfect alignment. If your building is perfectly square, and your rafters are cut to the same length, this isn't a problem.
I had a problem doing this when I built my critter engine shed, but eliminated problems in alignment, by placing a steel ruler (like you did in one of your pictures), next to each successive purlin. Makes perfect sense.
Thanks for your great tutorials.

Rich



Thanks Rich, actually, the roof is square, my ruler wasn't in alignment if I recall correctly. It'll be hidden anyway. It's more there to attach the following set of roof covering.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/26/2018 :  5:55:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Starting on the car side first, I laid down some 'tarpaper', and only 'colored' the underside with weathering powders, as it would be the only side to be seen when the roof is taken off.

With the corrugated aluminum I first dipped sections (cut to finished height, but about 2" long) into a bath of Radio Shacks Archer Etchant. Toxic stuff, so I wore rubber gloves, had some water handy, as this stuff only takes a few seconds to burn through the metal, but that is what I wanted on some pieces anyway. Also, did it outside.



On some pieces I used some weathering rust powders and on others, I used a rust solution.





After I coated some sections, which I did more for scenery than actual use on the roof, although I did use some on there, this is the result.





So, I attached the 'tarpaper', then started on one corner laying the corrugated panels, already pre-cut to width at this point.





And the finished result.




It looks a little better in person, as it always does, but I then (as it is shown above), came back with some brown shades of pastels to even out the colors a little, keeping with the same colors I have been using for the interior.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/26/2018 :  8:55:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

Very nice, especially the range of rust effects and colors.

I’m not familiar with the rust solution. Is it a metal treatment of some sort?

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2018 :  04:23:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

Very nice, especially the range of rust effects and colors.

I’m not familiar with the rust solution. Is it a metal treatment of some sort?

Mike

. Thanks Mike. Yes, the first ‘coating’ applied in two coats over 13 hours, letting one coat dry for one hour and the second one for 12 hours contains a metallic iron. The second coat is a watery solution which reacts to the iron to give the real rust effect. A little goes a long way, so a light coating of the ‘metalizer’ is all you need, and the nice thing about it is that you can apply it to almost any surface.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2018 :  09:33:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you, Tony.


Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2018 :  11:32:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good Tony.

Going to study this thread with a magnifying glass for my up and coming TT scale engine house. Learned a lot following your build thread. I've ordered windows so I can design the wall's al la Tony Style.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3145 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2018 :  12:45:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Your welcome Mike.

Bernd, wow, I am honored. Thanks.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2018 :  4:40:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Finally got about 90% of the roof finished. I still have the battons to add to the main roof. I wanted to have wide boards so I could add the batons without it looking too over crowded, and the widest I had in enough of a bulk was 2x10. So I went digging in my surplus and found some 1/32" basswood without siding, and the thickness was only about .005" thicker than my 2-by's, so I decided to use this.

The photos show step by step, but basically, I first cut the boards to the correct length, and before I did anything else, just distressed and added weathering to the boards as a whole first, then using a square, cut strips off at random widths. All the pieces, except a few at 1/4", measure a scale 12-18", this method saved me a lot of time individually distressing each board. Gluing everything on the roof was not very hard, but I had to take a break mid way, and I purposely cut the boards slightly differing lengths for that random look I wanted.






































Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 12/30/2018 09:06:59 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2018 :  11:28:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony looks great.

Overall so far you sure have done a fine job. Thanks for all the how tutorials.


Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 11509 Go to Top of Page

brownbr
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/30/2018 :  06:13:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Tony.

Bryan

Country: USA | Posts: 1514 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2018 :  06:35:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,

Noticing your wiring in the last few pictures, isn't it kind of difficult to pass them through the foam without tearing it up ? Did you use a drill bit or ice pick ? Or another method ? What was your longest length through the foam ?

I bought some of that rust solution a few years ago but haven't tried it yet. I hope it has a long shelf life. I like the weathering color used on the shed and roof. Great work.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4103 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2018 :  07:35:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your roof work looks great, Tony. Thanks for the detailed description on how your did them.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15183 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2018 :  08:57:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Jerry, thank you. Nice of you to say.

Bryan, thank you.

Rich, The distance to the inspection pit wasn't that far, 3 inches maybe (?), and I just used a drill bit before too much was done, which was way back even before the walls were started, I think. I just used a long 3/16" bit, which cleared the size of the LED's. The rust solution doesn't seem to have a shelf life, as I have had it for a few years myself.

George, Thank you, and your welcome. I hope it is something others can use that may not have been thought of. I wanted to thin the 1/32" wood about .010, and decided not to do it as the size difference wasn't that much from a 2 by plank. Only after I cut them did I remember I had a sander from Jim Byrnes. I don't like using that sander much, as it doesn't have a feed roller or anything, you have to do it by hand and pull it out the other end in the same motion. It can have a kickback if your not careful, don't ask how I know. Just stand out of the line of fire.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 12/30/2018 09:11:49 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2018 :  10:30:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by UKGuy

Tony,
I finally found some pictures of Bill Michaels incredible HO scale "new wood" …
his colouring and detailing is just superb, unfortunately, you'll need
to scroll quite a ways down this page to see it...

www.craftsmankituniversity.com/vanforum/index.php?p=/discussion/323/the-loco-and-service-shops-scratchbuilt-in-o-scale/p4

but its the best I've ever seen.

I hope it helps you and gives ideas.

Karl.A



Since my last computer crashed, I had to go back and look at this thread, and re-save all those pictures from Brett's forum. I had forgotten about a lot of the details, and if you don't mind, I am going to copy a few. I can't resist. Your attention to detail, Karl, is phenomenal, and has re-inspired me to look closer. I took to heart what you said in your message about slight differences in fresh cut wood, and I hope it shows on the shorty car I did. Thank you for jumping in and helping.

I welcome help or critique on anything I do, and can always change it if possible. Or just add to it. Karl, you stepped in at just the right moment, and I sincerely appreciate it.

My newer computer has 2 hard drives, they set it up with a smaller one to run the system, and a larger one for storage, so even if this new one eventually crashes, at least I'll have everything saved.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page
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