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Author Topic Next Topic: Sierra West Donkey Repair Yard:
Page: of 42

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/09/2018 :  5:01:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

Beautiful work on the rafters, Tony.

George



Thank you George.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

brownbr
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/10/2018 :  06:51:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow that is some precise work on those rafters. Great work also on the castings. I got a chuckle out of the nasty toilet bowl.

Bryan

Country: USA | Posts: 1514 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/10/2018 :  4:57:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bryon.

I had contracted a cold about 4 days ago, just a head cold, and it got worse up till today when I started to feel human again. So apart from working on a 1000 piece puzzle and resting, didn't get much else done.

But, today, I got the car side rafters up, and please take note, they are not spaced evenly YET, and supporting timbers still need to be added. All this will come.

But here are a couple of pictures.






Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 12/10/2018 4:59:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/10/2018 :  6:47:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Beautiful rafter work. Looks very real.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/15/2018 :  3:11:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Beautiful rafter work. Looks very real.

Mike



Thanks Mike.

Hey guys, I just got a new computer, so am slowly adding stuff on it I need. Would you believe the forum was the first I added?


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/15/2018 :  3:55:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

That says a lot. A few months ago I changed browsers and the forum was my first bookmark.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/16/2018 :  11:38:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

That says a lot. A few months ago I changed browsers and the forum was my first bookmark.

Mike



Interesting. Shows where our priorities lie.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/24/2018 :  12:36:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
First off, my computer bit the dust. I have the hard drive from that in the shop, hoping to salvage some files. In the mean time, I bought a new computer which works great, super fast, but still getting used to the platform. They added another hard drive for me, free of charge, for the operating system (on top of a $100 discount for first time customer), and the 500 gig pre-installed HD is storage only, very handy if it happens again. So the last couple of weeks, I have been working on getting things hooked up. The computer is custom, so please don't ask for a brand name, I don't think it has one. On the plus side, I now have the capability to subscribe to the forum topics, something I haven't been able to do for many years.

So, that being said, I have also been able to do a little more modeling. From the last pics I posted, the rafters were not much in the way of "in-line", or spaced evenly. I expected that, so I added some 2 x 10's to space them out. Fortunately, I only needed it in the lower section, so that saved me a lot of time. I know prototypically it should be more inclusive, and more rafters added for support, but I am taking modelers license here and leaving them out. I might go back in and add some vertical ones on the main roof. I also intend for the roof to be removeable.

But for now, I wanted to share how I treated the ends of the timbers that will go over the rafters to hold some vertical timbers etc., following the basic technique that Brett Gallant used on his engine shed from a few years back, since I like the way it looks.

I cut some 2 x 8 stripwood I bought in bulk from Northeastern, cut the lengths to size, leaving 3/16" overhang on each end. With the stripwood cut to length, and placed on a sheet of 1/4 plate glass, I used a razor blade to cut about 1/8" through the ends first, with the grain, so to speak, rapidly, and at random, and followed with more random, quick cuts at about 30° up, then @ 30° down. This is the only part that will be exposed to weather, so I didn't feel I needed to do the entire length.

I came back with a wire brush to smooth it out and create some additional 'scratches'. I then used a large brush to dip into some weakish 91° A/I for about 2 coats. This leaves the ends looking visibly worn out, like my old computer

At this point, I am waiting for it to dry a little, and will add some pastel greys later to enhance the look. These will be spaced about 1/2" intervals over the entire roof, then I will come back with some vertical slats.
































I also wanted to make note on brush cleaning. Since I also paint on and off, I use a 'brush soap' to clean my brushes. There are several brands, and I bought a couple of new ones recently that I haven't used yet. But rather than just clean a brush with water, I also swirl it in the soap.

The sequence is first use the water and a 'industrial' blue paper towel to wipe off the majority of paint, or even the A/I solution, dip it in the water again, wipe off some water, and swirl it in the soap. On very small brushes, I swirl 'that' in the palm of my hand to give it a good clean, and then rinse in the water again, on larger brushes, I just swirl it on the towel. I don't usually use two jars of water, only one, and have not had a problem, but a second jar of clean water would be good to give a final rinse to clean off any residues, however, I have found there has never been a problem. And as you can see, I have used this one piece a lot.








Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/24/2018 :  4:18:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Brush cleaner. You mean I could avoid this kind of thing:



Maybe I should get some.

Your roof is “topping.”

Mike



_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/24/2018 :  4:23:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Brush cleaner. You mean I could avoid this kind of thing:



Maybe I should get some.

Your roof is “topping.”

Mike





Yes, you can avoid it, however, don't throw that one away, I use a couple like that to spread stain or soft pastels over my wood or what ever I am working on. Works better than any scrubber.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/24/2018 :  5:52:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

In fact, it has been demoted to stain application already; the stiffness is a benefit. Probably what I need is “Brain Cleaner” because all that stuff on the brush is paint and stain that dried on when my distracted brain forgot to clean the brush in time.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5191 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/25/2018 :  08:37:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

In fact, it has been demoted to stain application already; the stiffness is a benefit. Probably what I need is “Brain Cleaner” because all that stuff on the brush is paint and stain that dried on when my distracted brain forgot to clean the brush in time.

Mike



Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/25/2018 :  09:16:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sorry for just the smiley face, Mike, my keyboard stopped working and I could only click the mouse.
So I wanted to add, I think we've all been there, that's how I got my "scrubbing brushes".

I let the previous application of AI dry, and came back with some weathering powders, AKA, soft pastels. These are the same colors I have been using for a few years since the build of my Sierra West engine shed. The darker, and some black, colors were scraped on with a razor blade, and mixed in using some mineral spirits I keep is a small paint jar for easy access. Then I used an almost cream color to highlight and soften the darkness of it all, just enough.












Last night, the crew finished the first of the longitudinal timbers (I'd like to know where they got them super long pieces of timber). They were 'nailed' down using Titebond wood glue. I used a .475" wide scale rule to space them. The first ones were the ends, then the roof peaks were next. I doubled, and tripled, up on the ends, as the rafters are pretty fragile at that point.














This morning I went by to see the progress and couldn't ignore the beauty of the morning sunrise, so I got my camera out and took a few pictures before the crew came by.






Till later. Merry Christmas everyone.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/25/2018 :  09:40:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks great Tony. Love those morning pictures. I can't get over how great that roof is looking.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3145 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/25/2018 :  10:43:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

Looks great Tony. Love those morning pictures. I can't get over how great that roof is looking.

Bernd



Thank you Bernd. The morning pictures were taken this morning with a sunset setting on the camera and an 60 watt equivalent LED light shining off from the side. But looks pretty cool, just the same.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 3068 Go to Top of Page
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