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Author Previous Topic: Back to basics.... Topic Next Topic: SierraWest and J.E. Mortons Brass & Iron Foundry
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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/06/2018 :  3:46:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony those are some great planes your scale modeling is perfect!

Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10765 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/06/2018 :  4:58:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bryan and Jerry, thank you both

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/09/2018 :  8:30:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here is a step by step on how I made the shelves I will need to store a lot of junk, boxes and cans of unknown contents. I left captions on each photo to help with the story. Since these will be hanging around a dirty shop for a long time, and not normally cleaned, and being made of wood, will attract dirt quite easily. So that was my intention. To show the dirt, even if it will be covered with items, the spaces between will be seen as needing cleaned.


















































Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/09/2018 :  9:43:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony

Brilliant. Another “How to” for the virtual file. You’re more efficient than IKEA and no Allen wrench was needed for assembly.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4129 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/09/2018 :  9:58:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
You can forget the bowl of Mars candy bars, the shelves make up the difference. Nice modeling
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3589 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/10/2018 :  03:39:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent How-To and excellent results.
Thanks Tony.


As you think, so will you be.

Country: USA | Posts: 22280 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/10/2018 :  07:44:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony, I'm just getting caught up on this thread. As the others have said, you do fantastic detail work. That's and ingenious way to build shelving. Thanks for the step by step description.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14620 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 05/10/2018 :  07:46:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great SBS Tony. Also a great idea of mass producing shelf's.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2670 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/10/2018 :  1:26:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I love your treads Tony. So much good and useful information. Thank you for sharing it.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4727 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/10/2018 :  3:46:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Oh my, what can I say but thank you all, and your very welcome.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/12/2018 :  08:04:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One thing I wanted to emphasize: the glue I used for these shelves, and is now my 'to-go-to-glue' is Titebond II woodworkers glue. For more years than I can remember, I have used Elmer's white glue, and it has served it's purpose, and may still continue for some applications, but I only recently bought a small bottle of Titebond II (even though I have a larger bottle I use in the woodshop) just for models to try it out. I figured if it works great on real world wood projects, why not in miniature, and yes, many others have said they use it a lot too. So after several weeks now, I have been sold. I use just a very small dab on the shelf ends before attaching to the supports, and it holds almost instantly, as it dries fairly quickly, which is ideal for modeling such things as these shelves, and the work benches. And since it dries fast, I also put just a small dab on a piece of paper and use a sharp toothpick to pick up a small amount to glue the parts. Just wanted to say.




Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 05/12/2018 08:09:11 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  12:39:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very authentic bookshelves, and the woodworking benches are simply superb!


Country: Ireland | Posts: 379 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  2:06:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit kebmo's Homepage  Reply with Quote
amazing. just amazing.

if you suck at playing the trumpet...that's probably why.

Country: USA | Posts: 1355 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2018 :  7:33:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you Jeff and Kevin, much appreciated.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 05/20/2018 :  12:52:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sometimes, the smallest details take the longest time to make. I found a set of woodworking tools I bought some time back (for $4.95, full price) from SSLtd, and I have been busy detailing these little pieces. In the real world, they would scale up too big to use, I think the long plane works out to 10" high. But on their own, they add a nice detail. The price on their site now is about $20 for the same set. So you can see my reluctance in using them, but I think this is the model they should be used in.

They only included one auger bit for the hand drill (brace), so I made a few more. Once I did, I needed a way to store them, rather than have them hanging around loose. So I built a caddy to hold the largest ones in back, and the smaller ones up front, and it will be hung on the wall, or a peg board of sorts later.

So how did I make the drill bits? I took some small brass strips, .010 x .018 and .010 x .030, put a pair of pliers on one end, about 1/2" in, and another flat nose pliers on the end and twisted the end until I had the 'coils' I wanted to represent the bit. I then cut it off to length and filed the ends for the screw end and chucking end.

The case was made from 2 x 12, with grooves scribed in it lengthways, sanded to round out the grooves, 3 grooves for the larger bits, about 6 for the smaller ones. Then it was just a matter of gluing the parts together. Since the bits were not needed to be removed, I glued them in too.

I assume that end beams on a freight cars needed large holes, hence the reason for the large bits. I have a couple of sets of bits and a several braces of my own (antique ones, which still work wonders), and they work great for drilling holes, and these are what would have been used a lot back then too.












Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2988 Go to Top of Page
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