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 Hand Laid Track - As question or two and inspirati
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Author Previous Topic: The 2017 Pick One, Build One Challenge Thread Topic Next Topic: Martins homegrown trees, bushes n weeds
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adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 06/16/2017 :  04:30:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone, Haven't visited the forums for a while. To busy with the 1:1 chores

While im working away i have been looking at module construction of a yard for my layout room that is also under construction.

I have obtained a very large amount of precision scale code 70 rail and many bags of ties.

I have been looking for inspiration on hand laid track and going through layout pictures.

I'm curious if Dick Elwells layout is hand laid track work. I find the ties and rail on it to look superb and something i would like to aim for.

Second to this what are some other standard gauge layouts of similar quality i should be looking to for inspiration.

Country: Australia | Posts: 1227

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 06/16/2017 :  06:33:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One example for you is the New England Berkshire and Western. Almost all the track and switches are hand laid (recent revisions of track in Chateaugay used ME flextrack). The mainline is code 83, secondary tracks are code 70 and 55.


Edited by - Bill Gill on 06/16/2017 06:35:18 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 1630 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 06/16/2017 :  08:39:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you Bill. Will have a look.

I did do a hon3 module a few years back in code 55. I did enjoy the process and learnt a lot. Now my turnouts are better using jigs and templates. I like the look but it's the daughting process of a double deck layout hand laid.



Country: Australia | Posts: 1227 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 06/16/2017 :  09:17:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you Bill. Will have a look.

I did do a hon3 module a few years back in code 55. I did enjoy the process and learnt a lot. Now my turnouts are better using jigs and templates. I like the look but it's the daughting process of a double deck layout hand laid.



Country: Australia | Posts: 1227 Go to Top of Page

C Laskey
Crew Chief



Posted - 06/16/2017 :  09:28:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Adrian
I know dick very well and have spent a few hours looking at that amazing layout. Dick has a lot of hand laid track from the early years but he changed over to flex track and seems to be very happy with it.
Carl



Country: USA | Posts: 844 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2017 :  09:44:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Scott Mason sold a 2 DVD set of Dick Elwell's Hoosac Valley Lines. And Great Model Railroads by Allen Keller, did Vol.#6. of Dick Elwell's Hoosac Valley. Two videos worth getting to help with ideas and inspiration.

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17234 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2017 :  10:10:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
My B&M Eastern Route is hand-laid except for hidden track. Last night I was working on the track shown on this page:

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20091&whichpage=59

I've only visited the Hoosac Valley once, but I don't recall seeing any commercial turnouts.



Country: USA | Posts: 5139 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2017 :  11:03:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a picture of Dick's track work and turnout. If not commercial turnouts, he is a pro at making them for sure! Picture taken by GreggW.



Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17234 Go to Top of Page

dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 06/16/2017 :  6:02:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Something you need to think about is spike size. I wouldn't use anything larger than Micro Engineering "Small" spikes. They were my standard until I put a small camera on a flat car and ran it around the layout. After that I switched to ME "Micro" spikes. They are much smaller, but harder to use. I found that I had about a 50% failure rate until I got better pliers (Micro Mark spike driving pliers or "tweezer" needle nose pliers) and created a pilot hole for the spikes (soldered a small embroidery needle in a 1/16 brass tub and then ACC'd that into a hole in a 3/4 in long piece of 1/4 inch dowel.) Those improvements got me to about a 98% success rate.

Handlaying track can be somewhat relaxing if you like it.

I have made several attempts to upload a pdf of a switch building clinic I gave at the MCoR NMRA convention, but it keeps erroring me out.


Dave H.

Iron men and wooden cars

Edited by - dave1905 on 06/16/2017 6:13:06 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1094 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 06/16/2017 :  6:44:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have a large collection of images from Mario over the years showing Dick's layout. I think the long term approach will be a combination of the two. Hand Laid and flex. I am determined to at least hand lay the main yard as it can be done in the module form in front of the TV with a glass of wine

Dave, thanks for the info on spike size and the tip with pilot holes. Sounds like an easy little tool to make.

One issue i'm having in australia is sub roadbed options for hand laying we don't have homosoate as far as i am aware and i have been looking for a similar product to use.




Country: Australia | Posts: 1227 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2017 :  9:21:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by adrian_batey



One issue i'm having in australia is sub roadbed options for hand laying we don't have homosoate as far as i am aware and i have been looking for a similar product to use.





If you have some place there that sells soundboard, there is no difference from sound board fiberboard, and homasote.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17234 Go to Top of Page

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 06/17/2017 :  04:23:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Louis, I figured it would be under a different name or type of product. I will have a hunt around the local suppliers of similar products and see what i can dig up.


Country: Australia | Posts: 1227 Go to Top of Page

Shady Pine
New Hire



Posted - 06/20/2017 :  12:30:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Adrian,
I learned hand laying track years ago in the 'Old Skool' days and the hobby has changed a lot since then. Today I use a combination of "best" practices, a mix of Proto:87 stuff for the handlaid work, Micro-Engineering,and Central Valley. I would avoid the ridiculously expensive "Fast Tracks" stuff.. it is "okay" if you don't want a lot of detail, I have used it for a client's layout but depending upon how much you plan on doing there's not much "fast" about it and frankly if you look at the prices.. they've priced themselves right out of the market to the point of being flatout insulting considering the lack of detail you're stuck with.

If you're fanatical about the details, look around and try some small samples of the various offerings and work with a mix wherein the detail is the ultimate goal, and your time being secondary.

Keep us posted as to which method you choose to pursue.



Edited by - Shady Pine on 06/20/2017 12:36:27 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 28 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Engine Wiper

Posted - 06/20/2017 :  2:09:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As Carl Laskey says it is a beautiful layout.
You can see more on modvid.com.au
Mario's site.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 100 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 06/20/2017 :  6:14:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hand-laid track is great for creating nice flowing track without the compromises that come with using commercial turnouts. Especially if one wants high-number turnouts. However, with care it is possible to build very realistic track with commercial turnouts etc with sufficient planning.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2412 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2017 :  9:44:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I also learned to hand-lay track long before FastTracks, but I must give them credit for getting a lot of people who I never expected to hand-lay back into that part of the hobby. Proto87 is also a great help with a lot of track parts you never used to be able to buy commercially. But I decided to paint my tieplates on rather than install them individually.


Country: USA | Posts: 5139 Go to Top of Page
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