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Author Topic Next Topic: Structures on the LP&N RR, vol.3
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Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/22/2017 :  11:12:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've made many 1:29 scratch-built buildings for an indoor layout. Most of my freight cars are too shiny looking and seem out of place by the buildings.

Maybe I'm stretching a scratch-build however, I wanted to show you how to improve the out-of-the-box look of a 1:24 Hartland car. I used several steps for the aging process to make the car look more like wood and metal.



First, very few railroad trucks are shiny black unless they are fresh from the shop. It's time to weather this car and bring it to life!

Step 1. Remove the trucks and the wheels from the trucks and apply Testors Dull Coat to the parts.

Step 2. Paint entire truck assembly and interior and center axle of the wheel with Burnt Umber Acrylic by Folkart.
Paint the exterior of wheels with Raw Umber Acrylic by Folkart. (Don't paint metal axle that rides in the truck)

Allow assemblies to dry!



Step 3. Paint the wheel surface that rides on the rail and the lip with Platinum Acrylic by Ceramicoat. Don't worry if some base color shows through the rim but wipe off any Platinum from the face of the wheel or the interior surface.



Weathering the Trucks:

Once dry, it's time to age the trucks. I use Bragdon Enterprises Weathering Kits. (#FF-65 and #FF-166)

For the applicators, I cut the bristles off of an old 1/8" diameter brush for general dusting and an old 1/16" diameter brush for finer work. Both had the bristles cut down to only extend about 3/32". (for smaller scales modify smaller brushes)

Step 4. Brush Dust Bowl Brown onto entire truck and coupler with the larger brush. Go with a heavier application in areas where dirt will accumulate. (edge of trucks, tops of surfaces, and crevices)



Step 5. Apply a light random application of Medium Rust. (the more you add the rustier the part will appear) You can always add more rust.



Step 6. Apply a minimal application of Light Rust. This application represents new rust areas. (spots on couplers, journal boxes, springs, bolts)



Step 7. Apply a random application of Soot. (inside couplers, coupler pins, tops of some surfaces, inside bolsters, journal box lid)



Step 8. Once satisfied with the look, lightly dull coat truck assembly and set aside.

Weathering the Wheels:

Step 9. Apply Dark Rust to inside of wheels and axle. Leave some of the Burnt Umber paint showing for contrast.



Step 10. Apply Soot Black Inside exterior of wheels. Leave some Raw Umber showing. Make each wheel look a little different.



Step 12. Apply dull coat and let dry.

Step 13. Assemble the wheels to the trucks.

This is my result after the finishing process.





No two truck weathering finishes are alike so feel free to experiment with the applications of dirt, rust and soot.
(My next build will use grey truck assemblies and I will document my method)

Next time...weathering the body.

Country: USA | Posts: 782

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 02/23/2017 :  08:23:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks really good, Dave. I'll be curious to see how the platinum Ceramcoat acrylic holds up in use. (Is it Ceramicoat like you wrote or Ceramcoat? I found a webpage for Ceramicoat, but the bottles of paint in one of he photos are Delta Ceramcoat).


Country: USA | Posts: 1482 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/23/2017 :  09:03:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill, it is Delta Ceramcoat. It will hold up for my purposes...I don't run my models very often. For those that run their trains more often, is there a better paint for the wheel to track surface that will hold up under a lot of usage? Actually you don't need to paint this surface if you do a lot of running. I just liked the look of the platinum over the black finish.
Thanks, Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 02/23/2017 :  10:13:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave, just curious why would you paint the wheel treads?


Country: USA | Posts: 3584 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/23/2017 :  11:39:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good morning Frank,
I painted the platinum on the treads since some of the prototypes I saw had shiny treads like the rail. To be honest I wouldn't take the time to paint the treads again since it is difficult to notice the treads unless you are looking at an end view of the car.Thanks for looking in.
Dave



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Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/24/2017 :  12:11:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Weathering the Body:
Step 14. Spray the areas to be painted with Dull Coat and when dry apply Burnt Umber Acrylic to the body and Slate Grey Acrylic by Americana to the end sills.



Step 15. Apply a heavy coat of Bragdon Weathered Brown to dirty the end sills. (this will blend in with the ink and alcohol stripwood deck which will be topping the flat car.)



Step 16. Apply a good coating of Dust Brown to body and then add random areas of Medium Rust.



Step 17. Apply random areas of Soot.



Step 18. Apply Light Rust in areas you want a new rust appearance. (small brush)



Step 19. Install wheel sets to body.



Step 20. Glue the 1/4" pre-stained wood decking to the top of the car.



This is the finished result. I think it looks much more interesting than the new out-of-the-box Hartland model.






Country: USA | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/24/2017 :  12:41:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice work Dave. These large scales really allow this kind of extra effort to be noticed.

What is the actual length of the car in this scale? About 12" I'm guessing...



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Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/24/2017 :  1:40:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Carl, I really appreciate the comments. Good guess on the size. The body of the 1:24 flat is 13" long.

I think this weathering approach will also work with O scale.

Dave



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Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 02/25/2017 :  12:28:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Great job!


Country: USA | Posts: 2996 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2017 :  11:11:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ray, glad you stopped by!



Country: USA | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2017 :  10:48:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice weathering process Dave'. Nice job'. Looks very good'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4195 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 02/26/2017 :  08:15:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks really good, Dave


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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 02/26/2017 :  09:25:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like it, I like it.


Country: USA | Posts: 3584 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 02/26/2017 :  11:33:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ted, Bill and Frank...Thank you so much for the nice comments.


Country: USA | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 03/16/2017 :  7:02:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
PART II - Making a stock car from a Hartland flat.

I want the stock car to be a shorty or 20 long. The original Hartland car is 13 or 26 long. Using a razor saw cut 3 from the center and re-glue sections together. I also cut off the side pockets.



Using balsa wood construct the sides and ends.



The sides are 9 3/16 x 3 3/8 overall using 1/8 square and 1/16 x 1/4 strip wood. The door opening is 1 15/16 wide.



The ends are 3/58 wide x 3/3/8 tall using 1/8 square and 1/16 x 1/4 strip wood.
The doors are 2 1/8 wide x 3 3/16 tall using 1/16 x 1/4 strip wood.



Glue the (4) sub assemblies together.



Make (6) roof supports 1/16 x 1/2 x 3 9/16 to fit inside of assembly. Tapered supports from mid span to the ends to allow a 1/4 roof protrusion above the ends. Notch the roof supports ( 1/8" square) at center and mid spans to accept 1/8 x 9 long beams.



Glue the roof supports in place then add the beams.



Add 4 end trim to match roof support slope and 1/16 x 1/4 trim across sides.




Country: USA | Posts: 782 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/16/2017 :  7:40:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
! Dave, that is some fine construction you have there'..Beautiful craftsmanship and then some'..Looks better than Taylor made'..




Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4195 Go to Top of Page
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