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desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2017 :  10:39:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To make this build easier to follow, and not have to did through the actual challenge build thread, I'm posting it here in its entirety.

Bill (Geezer) Andersen Memorial Challenge: Actual thread:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=47916&whichpage=1

This is a build to tribute a Railroad-Line member "Bill (Geezer) Andersen” called the Bill (Geezer) Andersen Memorial Challenge within The On30 Line of the Railroad-Line Forum.
I have had this 3-in-1 kit on the shelf for many years, and find it would make a great Galloping Geezer for my layout to remember Bill. For this challenge I'll build it for now as a static model, with plans at some time to power it. It will take long enough now as it is to just build the non-powered version. So please keep aside a set of Bill's Logo the Wilani, for this build. Thanks in advance!



I had forgotten how much cutting and bashing these Roundhouse MDC 3-IN-1 kits needed, until I started to read over the instructions and began cutting the first step of this build.
Pictured are the first steps in constructing the floor, pilot and rear truck. They give you a Harriman baggage car underframe, and a template to cut out the floor of the Galloping Goose.
Also, plastic Pilot wheels along with flanged metal rims to be press fitted, and metal axles to make up the front wheel set, along with a truck assembly for the rear.
I may be posting more pictures than I need to be, but I plan on using this build also as a how-to at some point, so bear with me. This kit will be built as instructions dictate, however
I will not be gluing down the box and cab so at some point in time I can power this unit. I want the Galloping Geezer to be mobile around my layout, as Bill should be, and not static.











I worked on the Mail Compartment. The kit gives you a 36” Box car Body that needs to be cut back 2-1/2 inches from the “A” end (end opposite brake).
I had to remove the side sills on both sides, and file and sand down the door detail that was left on the cut down mail compartment sides. Next I have to make a front end
fascia top trim, and a front piece for this cut down Mail Compartment out of .020” plastic sheet, also making a set of new side doors to complete the Mail Compartment section.








This evening I cut a piece of .020” styrene as instructed for both sides, and scribed in a center line to form the new Mail Compartment doors. I have some plastic hinge sets around somewhere and will use them on the doors. As far as making a front end fascia top trim, and a front piece for the Mail Compartment out of .020” plastic sheet as instructed, I opted to cut the brake end of the original 36” box car body and glued that onto the new Mail Compartment as seen in the picture. Why they ask to cut a new piece from styrene, and scribe in the wall wood lines makes no sense when you can just cut off the other end and use that cut to size. The passenger compartment will set up against that end wall and cover most all of that wall anyway.
At this point in time I'm thinking of having Geezer's Logo centered on the Compartment doors.



Well now I’m on to constructing the passenger compartment. The kit comes with a Box Cab shell to be used for this purpose. Here is where all the cutting and dicing will come into play. The first picture shows the Box Cab and how the first cuts will be made, and look like in step #12.
The second picture shows all of the first step cuts made, and the piece on the left is the start of the passenger compartment used in Step #12. Next, the Box Cab body sides need to be cut as per instructions in Step #13. Cutting out two windows and a door section from each side panel, and cutting out/open the top window on each door section. Then, all the cut pieces have to be rearranged, and glued into place with a reinforcement strip, making up the new sides for the passenger compartment as seen in Step #14 and #15.









This afternoon my first picture shows the Box Cab shell side that I need to cut out the new sections from. Next picture shows I have cut out the sections that need to be rearranged for the passenger compartment, and cut open the top windows in both door sections. Then third picture, assembling the sections as per instructions to construct the passenger compartment sides, and gluing the completed sections to the cut down cab front section that was formed in step #12. This completes the passenger compartment. Now on to constructing the engine cover from cut leftover pieces from the box cab roof section, and .020” styrene pieces for the engine side covers and front radiator as shown in step #18.







The Engine Compartment Cover pieces are cut, and ready for gluing parts together. The leftover piece from the Diesel Box Cab roof from Step #12 will be used because it has rounded over edges for use as the engine cover hood. (See picture) Step #16 shows where to cut the leftover roof section. It asked for a 7/8” long cut, but I opted for 1” being that the motor compartment looked to short, and out of proportion to the passenger compartment. Also, Step #17 shows the next set of cuts for the engine cover assembly asking for 1/4” cuts from each side, but again do to proportion I opted for 3/8” pieces for a wider engine cover. Step #18 shows the two pieces cut from styrene for the engine side covers, and a piece cut for the radiator front engine cover. Tomorrow is another day, which will be used to glue the assembly together.



Starting off today with the first picture, the engine compartment has been glued together, a styrene rod was used for the hood side covers top hinge, and future details will have a radiator cap and a wire mesh screen at the front as a radiator grill.
Second picture shows the engine compartment up against the passenger section showing the new bigger size, and what it looks like now. I think before, as instructions stated the measurements, it was to narrow and way to short.
Last picture shows the three major subassemblies set-up against each other, the Mail Compartment, the Passenger Compartment and the Engine Compartment with the floor/chassis in the foreground.
Next, and last step for the Galloping Geezer will be the plow. That I'm sure can be done later this afternoon.







Here is the final part constructed before the Galloping Geezer can be put together. From the first picture, using the Full Scale Templates in the instructions, I cut the pieces for the Snow Plow from .020” styrene. The Snow Plow Blade Spacer was cut as instructed, however, I changed the Snow Plow Blade shape. As seen in Step #19, the blade is more of a square shaped blade, (see how the kit blade would look in the second picture). So I put a wing shape to it so it could look more prototype as seen in the last picture, Right bottom corner insert.







Today the Geezer Goose headed for the paint shop and got a primer paint job. Now we can see what needs to be filled, sanded or fixed. Nothing like a photo or paint job to see the flaws and imperfections.
Now that this 3-in-1 kit has been put together, it is not as bad looking as I always thought it to be. It actually turned out to be a nice looking piece of equipment.



Today I received the set of Bill’s logos for my project, so soon I’ll be applying them to the Galloping Geezer. As I had said at the start of my build, that I’d want to power the Galloping Geezer, I came up with an unusual mode of power for it until I can use a better power drive within the Goose itself.
I already know you guys will laugh, and find this a weird power drive system, but it is quick, easy, down & dirty. And something to get the Galloping Geezer mobile until I come up with a better drive system. I’m leaning toward using a 44 Ton drive unit like I did on my L&R Express Mail Rail truck: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=36263
So here goes my plan. I have this early 70’s Tyco 0-8-0 Chattanooga (with what they called a Power Torque motor for better power and traction) Boy were we ahead of our time then.
Anyway this thing would remain on the shelf forever if I didn’t do something with it. The motor drive system is in the tender, so my plan is to use this drive system in a cut down box car, and use it as a pusher for the Galloping Geezer. Laugh if you might, but I’ll have a traveling Geezer!







Starting with the motor I had to make an insulator so I could get power from both sides of the motor. As the Locomotive had power coming in from the engineer’s side, and the tender received power from the fireman’s side.
The last two pictures show the metal wheels on the same side as it comes, and the next picture shows the metal wheels changed to opposite sides so power could be picked-up from each side.










Some of you may want to know the measurements so I hope this answers any question on measurements.
The ruler may be hard to see the measurements so here goes;
(1) The tender is 5" from foot board to foot board.
(2) The wheels front to rear centers measure 3-1/4"
(3) Ruler showing the 3-1/4" although the camera angle doesn't show it that well.
(4) The power unit is front to back 4-1/4" not measuring the coupler and coupler box. That is another 1" added if you use it.
(5) The motor is 1-3/8" tall, from base to top of motor.
(6) A picture looking down at the frame and motor for a visual of drive size.













I have a donor Box Car for the Geezer Trailer, an unknown manufacturer of a D&RGW. The inside, side to side measurements are perfect, with the tender measurement and box car both being 1-1/4” wide. This will allow the box Car shell to set down onto the motor frame, and lock into place as did the tender shell with the four mounting tabs. The last picture shows where I’ll be making the cuts on the Box Car, then re-gluing back together, to form the trailer shell to cover the motor, and also cutting out the four rectangle holes for the mounting tabs of the motor frame. This modification/kit bash is looking like it will be easier than I first thought.









I have now made the cuts needed to shorten the Box Car, now I need to re-glue the shell back together, and then make the four mounting tab cuts along the bottom of the Box Car shell to mount onto the motor frame.







The Box Car has been glued back together, mounting tab holes cut into bottom of Box Car, and first paint job has been applied. The Box fits very well onto the motor frame, and there is plenty of room inside for a sound decoder and speaker. For this point in time I’m just going with a standard Digitrax non-sound decoder I have laying around. Other than another finish paint job, painting the motor mounting tabs silver, (so they won’t stand out like a punch in the eye with that black color), and changing the horn hook coupler to a Kadee coupler, I think we are done with the pusher box car for the Geezer Trailer.





You can't change the side frames, they are intergraded into the wheel assembly at the pick-up wheel. Both ends are the same.
Unless I cut, drill and tap for new side frames, and it isn't worth all that.





The Galloping Geezer had a Kadee Coupler #33 with short centerset shank mounted, and a set of Intermountain metal wheel sets replacing the older plastic wheel sets. Also, the WILANI Logo decals have been applied to the Galloping Geezer. I went with the Month and Day of Bill’s death for the Galloping Geezer road number being “816”.
The Geezer Trailer had a Kadee #27, medium underset shank Coupler, mounted into the Tyco Talgo type tender motor/truck coupler box following the 20-Series instructions using the Talgo Adaptor. Also, WILANI Logo decals were applied to the Geezer Trailer, and the year of Bill’s death being 2016 for the road number. I made up a set of decals as seen in the picture below for the trailer sides. “Galloping Geezer Railroad Maintenance”. This is my tribute to Bill!





Finished for now! As in future time, I will be adding adlake markers to the Galloping Geezer rear end sides, a roof mounted light, bell and other details as sand buckets etc. Many things happened for me here with this build. A very good reason for me to get it off the shelf and put this kit to good use. Getting me inspired to build something once again. And, most importantly having Bill’s memory at my layout for me to see daily, and remind me of the great post on the Forum he made, emails, kit exchanges and just being a friend behind the scenes. The Galloping Geezer Railroad Maintenance sign went on a bit off, and didn’t keep the squared lines. I guess I should have made the decal leaving off the black outline. In any case, I feel this came out better than expected, and a wonderful, thoughtful reason to bring it about. Thank you Larry for this great challenge build thought, and Bill will be missed very much!









Now if I only had a movie camera and knew how to post on YouTube you could see how great this thing actually runs.






Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2017 :  10:53:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Louis,
Great build and it is nice to see it posted in one place as well.



Country: USA | Posts: 10873 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/08/2017 :  7:53:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Louis, that's fabulous. I enjoyed looking at this one.

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1057 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/08/2017 :  8:04:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like the idea Louis. Great job.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2116 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2017 :  10:33:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by time2play


Louis, that's fabulous. I enjoyed looking at this one.

Bob



quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

I like the idea Louis. Great job.

Bernd



Thanks a lot Bob!

And Thanks Bernd for your reply as well.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721 Go to Top of Page

Glen Haasdyk
Fireman



Posted - 01/08/2017 :  10:34:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good job, Louis.
This is one 3-1 kit that I don't have in my collection, but maybe I should now that I have seen yours



Country: Canada | Posts: 1986 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2017 :  10:35:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glen Haasdyk

Good job, Louis.
This is one 3-1 kit that I don't have in my collection, but maybe I should now that I have seen yours



Thanks Glen for your kind comment.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/09/2017 :  08:32:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice work, Lou. I think that I have that 3 in 1 kit stashed away someplace.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 29553 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/09/2017 :  08:36:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice Louis!

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12270 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/09/2017 :  08:49:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bruce and Mike!

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721 Go to Top of Page

k9wrangler
Fireman



Posted - 01/09/2017 :  10:31:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice tutorial and excellent end product. Thanks for sharing this with the crowd.


Country: USA | Posts: 8414 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/09/2017 :  1:26:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Louis, nice work of plastic surgery on this galloping Geezer.
You are really becoming a master at making these wonderful creations!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6877 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/09/2017 :  7:34:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by k9wrangler

Nice tutorial and excellent end product. Thanks for sharing this with the crowd.



quote:
Originally posted by Ensign

Louis, nice work of plastic surgery on this galloping Geezer.
You are really becoming a master at making these wonderful creations!

Greg Shinnie



Thank you very much Karl and Greg!


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/10/2017 :  4:09:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, Louis, I think you take the cake for the longest post. That is a real sweet looking goose you have there.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/10/2017 :  5:08:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Nelson458

Wow, Louis, I think you take the cake for the longest post. That is a real sweet looking goose you have there.



Thanks Tony! The longest post is only because it is copied, and compiled from the original thread. I'd never be able to post all that at one time.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16721 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/10/2017 :  5:56:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another good one, Louis. Thanks for giving us an informative step by step.

I was curious how the motor ran, but you answered that in your last post. That sounds like a nice source of power.

George



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