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Author Previous Topic: An Old Man Contemplates an Old Mans Layout Topic Next Topic: What to do with it all
Page: of 27

Hopeless
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2017 :  2:58:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I buy almost all my wood at Michael's. It is cheaper and just down the street. I don't think anyone notices, as in 2011 I won first place in structures at the narrow gauge convention, and 3rd place last year. All the flooring, framing and walls were built with it on both buildings. Most sizes are pretty close and I usually choose a size that is smaller than what I need. I hope this helps.

I like the way mine is coming out and look forward to more updates

Roland



Country: USA | Posts: 1818 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2017 :  3:32:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Roland, I scouted around the web and found a picture of your 3rd place winner entry - beautiful! Now, what scale size are your beams, posts, floorboards, and siding? Are they representing 8x8s, 2x10s, what? I understand you are using fractional size stripwood from Michaels so if you just tell me what sizes you used, I can figure out what to use for my O scale bldg.
Thanks,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page

Hopeless
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2017 :  5:26:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Everything is packed in boxes for the upcoming move but I will give you what I remember. A 1/8x1/8 works out to a 6x6. The next size up is close enough to an 8x8. I used these 2 to build the framing. with larger pieces for the header and sill. I think it was close to an 8x10. The horizontal pieces are 1/16x1/8 which is close to a 3x6. 1/16x1/4 which is close to a 3x12 were used for the wall boards. They do not offer a lot of different sizes but if you take a scale rule and see what works for what you want to build. Flooring in both models is 1/8x1/8.






When I said nobody notices, this model received the Mt Albert award for the best wood model. As with most of my models I just chose what looks good to me and go with it. As long as it looks right I am happy

Roland




Country: USA | Posts: 1818 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2017 :  6:52:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Interesting discussion. I found myself reacting to several topics. So, just for fun . . .

Details: I usually detail all sides because I modify my layout often enough that what is facing away from the viewer on one version might be facing the aisle in the next.

Stripwood: in recent years I've been using Mt. Albert, which Is much the same as Kappler. Determining the right sizes is a challenge and I feel I don't always get it right. When I'm doing a freelance structure or working from a photo I try to find plans of similar structures as a guide.

Mike





_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Edited by - Michael Hohn on 07/13/2017 7:52:21 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 4135 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/13/2017 :  6:54:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Guys I use Midwest Products scale lumber. I buy some of the finer strips cos I can't cut it that fine. But I mostly buy their sheets and cut it to size myself. Comes 24" long and either 3 or 4 inches wide. Good consistent product. But for siding boards I've been cutting balsa wood. Great for distressing.

As for sizes I eyeball it. It has to look right and sometimes being too accurate doesn't like right!! Sometimes you need something to look like it's about to fall down. Other times you want it to look like the builders wanted it to last, so they over built.

I guess it all boils down to what you are modeling. If you are doing a prototype then you are stuck with the measurements. But I follow no man and make my own mistakes.!!!!!!!!!!!!

bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 389 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/14/2017 :  1:05:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gentlemen, thank you so much for chiming in. I'm an engineer by training and feel I need a recipe (drives my wife nuts when I'm in the kitchen as she cooks by taste and smell). If I had the luxury of having bundles of stripwood kicking around I could play with different sizes but I have to order the stuff in and I don't want to order in a bunch of wood only to find it doesn't work. I think I can figure it out at this point.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/14/2017 :  2:59:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
During my research, I found this link to a PDF. It has possibly been listed somewhere in this forum (maybe that's where I first ran across it!) but here it is again. As far as I know, it's free so I don't think I'm breaking any copyright laws....
http://keeline.com/etexts/1893-Berg-Buildings_and_Structures_of_American_Railroads.pdf
It is kind of a treatise on old American RR structures - descriptions and such with some drawings but not scale drawings. Interesting to "thumb" through anyway.
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/14/2017 :  6:52:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I've used that book a lot, which I should have mentioned. Some of the diagrams include framing which I've found helpful for deciding on reasonable sizes for roof trusses etc.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4135 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/14/2017 :  7:04:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the link Dave. Now I'll get a headache looking for the next project????



bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 389 Go to Top of Page

drmsparks
Engine Wiper



Posted - 07/15/2017 :  11:24:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
i love how that kit is coming together. I have an HO scale one and am using the ore bin and headframe for a mini mine scene I am putting in my On30. I'm getting a lot of good information here I can use in my work. Thanks again for taking the time to post this up!


Country: USA | Posts: 108 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/15/2017 :  2:38:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by drmsparks

i love how that kit is coming together. I have an HO scale one and am using the ore bin and headframe for a mini mine scene I am putting in my On30. I'm getting a lot of good information here I can use in my work. Thanks again for taking the time to post this up!


David, you are elcome. I got all my information from others who have taken the time to post stuff. Now I wish I had done a better job. So I assume you are doing a little forced perspective on your layout?
Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page

drmsparks
Engine Wiper



Posted - 07/15/2017 :  5:41:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
some forced perspective, some artistic license/ caricature with a bit of a shadow box similar to what I believe Trevor Marshall did when he was modeling two foot. I'm using parts of the Banta kit for a small mine. The head frame and the ore bin will be left as is but I'm adding a level to each. The hoist house was destroyed in a flood and will be replaced with a larger scratch built one. The kit was built by my dad years ago for his On30 and I want to include it in my new railroad.


Country: USA | Posts: 108 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/18/2017 :  1:48:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A little bit of progress. I papered the roof of the hoist house. I used some two-sided tape I got a Michael's. It was dispensed out of a contraption similar to correction tape. It's not messy but it's hard to be accurate in its placement.
The black box on top of the tipple is my shelter for the ore bin. It will be sided same as the hoist house.


I got some fine brass wire with the kit with no instructions as to what to do with them. When I contacted Bill he said he used to use them to make eyes for the chute ropes to run through. Great idea! So I did that as well. Still need to paint them.



The design called for a different system for pulling up the chute doors but I went with a wooden cleat to tie off the rope. The picture is a little blurry - it seems my camera was liking the NBW more!



Still needs weathering, of course.

As usual, any comments are welcome.
Cheers,
Dave



Edited by - David Clark on 07/18/2017 1:51:34 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/18/2017 :  5:43:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks great, Dave!

I like the way the cleats look. The only limitation I see is that in real life gravity might not be enough to force the door down to stop the flow.

You have a good start on the weathering.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4135 Go to Top of Page

David Clark
Fireman



Posted - 07/18/2017 :  5:48:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Looks great, Dave!

I like the way the cleats look. The only limitation I see is that in real life gravity might not be enough to force the door down to stop the flow.

You have a good start on the weathering.

Mike


Thanks Mike! I think "in real life" there's all kinds of bad things that would happen with this structure. LOL!

Cheers,
Dave



Country: Canada | Posts: 1122 Go to Top of Page
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