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Author Topic Next Topic: Low light shots
Page: of 19

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/23/2017 :  07:43:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That foundation is a huge improvement over the laser-etched one!

Cheers,
Jeff.


Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

Country: Ireland | Posts: 365 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/23/2017 :  4:09:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jeyjey

That foundation is a huge improvement over the laser-etched one!

Cheers,
Jeff.



Thanks Jeff. I agree, the kit foundation bothered me a lot since each piece was like the next.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/27/2017 :  06:09:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Not much time to chat right now, just doing another scene within a scene, rusty pipe that need replacing due to heavy leaks, will have a truck near by to do repairs, and still have a little weathering to do on that wall there too.












Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 01/27/2017 06:10:44 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/27/2017 :  11:21:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Fabulous detailing Tony. They're great!

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1057 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/27/2017 :  4:08:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by time2play


Fabulous detailing Tony. They're great!

Bob



Cheers Bob. I will be adding some weathering to the walls near the pipes too. One step at a time.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/27/2017 :  7:21:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent piping Tony'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4278 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/27/2017 :  8:16:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by quartergauger48

Excellent piping Tony'..



Thanks Ted


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

kebmo
Fireman



Posted - 01/28/2017 :  3:28:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit kebmo's Homepage  Reply with Quote
the pipe and brackets look incredibly accurate. what an amazing job. bravo!!


Country: USA | Posts: 1034 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/28/2017 :  5:07:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Quietly following along Tony....and always impressed! Well done.


Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/28/2017 :  5:17:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Quietly following along Tony....and always impressed! Well done.



Thank you Carl.

I have been adding a few details, the windows are in, at least the 2nd floor, now, the rest are in the works. The pipe is finished except for some ivy I want to add crawling up the pipe, added a bit more weathering to the concrete and added a faucet with a bucket hanging off it, all the doors are in, one I added a screen door (Vector Cut), at the request of management, as he likes to have the door open in the summer, but doesn't want the flies coming in, and pretty soon, the roof trim will start. But, here is how it looks now.























Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/28/2017 :  7:03:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

That's really coming together nicely Tony. Well done...

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1057 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/28/2017 :  7:10:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

Lots of beautiful little details: the large doors, the screen door (!!), rusty waste pipe (yuck!), concrete foundation.

I am interested in the various trim colors you have used. It looks like a dark grayish blue on the window trim and a couple shades of green on the various doors and door trim. Olive green?

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2278 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2017 :  06:47:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob and Mike, thank you.

The color of the windows is from Krylon Satin I bought at Hobby Lobby many years ago. It's a Hunter green #3502. I rarely, almost never, use a shaker can spray paint, and may not again, it tends to go on a little too thick, but in the end, after it dried, it turned out ok. But it's also harder to match with other details I wouldn't use a spray can to paint with, like the wood doors, it would hide every little detail. When I first used it, I thought it would go on thinner. But as they say, 'it is what it is'.

The doors are a lighter green, I used a "Craft Smart" olive green #23644, a craft paint from Michaels. I used a pan pastel wedge sponge to apply the paint, it is very easy to use, and I like this method now I have started to use it. I bit the bullet a few months ago and bought 5 packets of 3 each of the sponges to last me a long time, from Dick Blicks art supplies for about $2.58 a pack (http://www.dickblick.com/products/panpastel-sofft-tools/). Better than a paint brush sometimes, and it can also be washed. The trim was left unpainted, I used various pastels or weathering colors over a wash of black india ink and alcohol. It gave the nice grey color I liked for the trim.

A note on the sponges, which, by the way, I highly recommend, they are somewhat dense, so they don't absorb color like a normal sponge, which is a benefit to me, as I can take a little amount of paint and dab the door, wall or what ever, and I get a nice even coat. For brick walls, I LOVE them, really, and won't use any other method now. but I use a combination brush and a 'Sofft' (as they are called) sponge. First I paint a color of mortar over the bricks (I often use the Monster Model Works or Rusty Stumps walls), then I use the brush to paint a little color onto the wedge sponge so that I don't pick up too much if dabbing it into the paint, then I dab the sponge over the wall. It leaves paint on the brick and doesn't get into the mortar. Hence the reason I like the stiffness or density of the sponge. If you haven't tried this, and hate painting walls without results, this is a great way to get the look you could be looking for. If you have 2 or 3 shades of what ever color brick you want, you can quickly vary the color of the bricks with this method.

Quick edit here; I always weather my models, EVERYWHERE! That includes the windows after the paint dried, with soft pastels from Rembrandt (in this case) or Dr. Bens, or sometimes pan pastels. I vary the coloring a little. I also used Rembrandts pastels (artists brand) to put a brownish tint over the entire walls. If you go back and compare some of my earlier shots of the walls, you'll see they look to bright. The lighter brown color gave it enough aging and 'dusty dirt' look that really makes it look older and been there a while.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 01/29/2017 06:53:15 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2017 :  06:56:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Compton

Tony,
I really like the look of that interior and the wood piles you have created. You are giving me some great ideas on how to finish up mine once it gets "planted" on the layout [which is under construction]. Here are a couple pictures of mine. It is not quite up to par with your build but I enjoyed the challenges of this kit and the way it turned out. I'll keep following along for more inspiration!
Jeff





Jeff, I really love the color of the walls on your model. Can you tell us what you used?


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2017 :  11:26:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've added the upper story windows and the two vents. Now, I will get to the roof. These windows, obviously, are not what the kit manufacturer had in mind, I just like changing things up a bit. It was a lot of wok, but I think it was worth it. Some of the windows will have some vents coming out, which I will add later.












Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2538 Go to Top of Page
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