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Author Previous Topic: HO Figures Suitable For The 1930s Topic Next Topic: Scratch-building Graves - 2017 challenge
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Jeff Compton
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 12/31/2016 :  11:41:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's looking good Tony. Its definitely a challenging kit and anyone building this will benefit from this thread. The windows do need to be left until later. I'll try to post some pictures of mine when I get access to a computer!
Jeff



Country: | Posts: 253 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  2:27:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Louis, thank you, let's hope I don't get one. We had a 4 point something earlier this year, that was enough.

Thanks Jeff. Looking forward to seeing yours.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  3:09:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have added the trim. Yep, that's all, or nearly all. It looks like the trim was to be added before the walls were put together. I didn't, a little oops on my part for missing it. The down side to doing it after is that is if the wall didn't line up right when joining the adjacent wall, the trim might stick out a little more on one or both walls. Mine did just a little on one, but not very noticeable.

I was looking at the trim supplied in the kit, which is 5/64" (.078"), and the actual measurement being .081 to .082" This scales out to about 7.1". For trim, I usually use 4" or 6", depending on the model, wall thickness etc. For this model, it looked a lot bigger than I liked. Here is a shot of what they look like.





I chose to use some of my own stock, not 6 x 6, but 1/16" square, which is a tad smaller, by .006-.008". at .062", or a scale 5.4". It does look better on the model. See for yourself, and you can make your own decision (there are only 3 corners that need this trim):




Later in the instructions, from what I get out of it, the remaining trim to be added (later??) is 2x6 stripwood. Still, with the smaller trim I used, the offset over the siding is closer to 1". So my trim size of choice is 1x5 stripwood. Yep, that's right, 1 x 5. I bought a packet from Kappler Mill & Lumber a long time ago, knowing I would need it one day. The width is the same as the 1/16" stripwood, so it will fit right in, not be too large, and just looks right.

Before I could add the trim, however, it needs painting. I wanted something a little darker, but not too dark that it would be out of place. I chose a Delta Ceramcoat acrylic craft paint: Quaker Grey. First I dunked the stripwood in the A/I solution I used before, and used a Pan Pastel sponge to wipe the paint on. This doesn't put it on too heavy, and is easier to control. You can wash the sponge after you use it too. While I had the wood on the glass plate (I do a lot of the painting there, easy to clean off), I thought about the Pan Pastels I have and decided to give something a try. I have the gray set, and picked out the Neutral Gray shade #820.3. I don't use these pastels much, but they come in handy once in a while. It's worth having on hand for times like these.



It blended in nice, and that gave me another idea. The lighter Neutral gray, #820.5, I rubbed in inline with the siding (side to side), in sections, and I liked the way it looked. It blended al the colors in beautifully. I had some somewhat splotchy white areas I didn't notice before, and the brown dirt I added at the bottom to represent kicked up dirt, was a little too strong. Here is a shot of the lower half being "shaded"


And after:


Here it shows how it blended in the browns better.



Here are a couple of shots as it is now, trim added, greys blended, ready for the next step.





Hope this helps. The trim looks better in a smaller size, and using pan pastels to blend the colors, these are two thing I think we can take away from this.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  5:16:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

Gettng the trim right is a subtle correction to the kit but important in my opinion. One way you can improve the appearance of the completed model.

Those odd sizes of stripwood are useful, aren't they?

Your structure keeps getting better. Thank you for showing us all the steps.

Mike


____________________________________
And we gazed upon the chimes of freedom flashing. Bob Dylan

Country: USA | Posts: 2200 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  5:21:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

Gettng the trim right is a subtle correction to the kit but important in my opinion. One way you can improve the appearance of the completed model.

Those odd sizes of stripwood are useful, aren't they?

Your structure keeps getting better. Thank you for showing us all the steps.

Mike



Thanks Mike. And you are welcome. It's my pleasure, albeit a little extra work, but enjoyable at the same time.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:14:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The next step, really is sort of self explanatory, as they say. The foundation.
The parts to the foundation are on this sheet:


There are a couple of tips I can offer. Rather than sand the wall sections to the line, I just used a razor blade and sliced downwards. You can do it a little at a time, or if you have the confidence, the whole thing at once, as I have done here. Oftentimes, you might need to lightly sand off a little to square it up, but that's all.


Another bit I found is to use your tru-sander to square off the edges of the inner braces:


This will improve the glue joint by giving a better fit and more glue area. Doesn't take much, just a few swipes is all you need.


That's it for tonight. Happy new year to all.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:20:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Forgot to add the completed shot. Also the second photo here shows the direction of the cut.








Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Edited by - Nelson458 on 12/31/2016 10:25:08 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:38:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
Great tutorial and good progress on your build.
I too, have used the pan pastels to enhance the blending on some strip wood. They really come in handy when you want a different shade.
And good call on the trim.
Happy New Year to you.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2453 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2017 :  07:01:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Tony,
Great tutorial and good progress on your build.
I too, have used the pan pastels to enhance the blending on some strip wood. They really come in handy when you want a different shade.
And good call on the trim.
Happy New Year to you.
Rich



Thank you Rich, and happy new your to you too.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2017 :  08:25:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The next step is the dock or platform. This is mind numbing with all the pages associated with this, the diagrams, and parts, so here is the short and sweet. You need 3 sheets of laser cut parts as shown here:


The decking is self adhesive backing, so although I want to give it some color, I didn't want to use paint. So my next go-to- painting medium is soft pastels. Mine are mostly from Rembrandt, and are easily bought from stores like Dick Blicks and Artarama. Or at an art store if your lucky to have one (I don't). Here is what I have and use the most. I have Brett Brown from Sierra West for this idea, as he used the same thing on his models.




The best thing to do with these, once you get them, is put them in a parts container that has solid non-removable sections. Take a razor blade and scrape the pastel into the compartment of your choice, and leave the rest of the stick in there for future scrapings when your powder runs low. I used 408.5 and a touch of 408.9 on top to lighten some areas. Use a very stiff brush with almost no bristles left to rub it in the wood.

Here is the effect I wanted. No other coloring is needed. I use this technique on most of my models now.



Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2017 :  09:23:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Man, you don't fool around! You're making terrific progress and looking good...

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1050 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2017 :  09:27:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by time2play


Man, you don't fool around! You're making terrific progress and looking good...

Bob



Thanks Bob. Actually, I'm sort-of taking my time, a few hours a day maybe? But I am on vacation. When I go back to work, it will slow a bit.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2017 :  11:34:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
I like the looks of the Sokol building with the different angles and wood siding. Anxious to see the finished product after you apply your modeling skills and imagination to the build.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 788 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2017 :  1:03:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you Dave, appreciate that.

Now, to continue on...

Sometimes you can be searching for things that are different than the directions vs. the parts list. This is one. Looking for a separate sheet of parts, P64A for the cross members of the dock, it could not be found, only for it to finally click when I saw it on another sheet that had been labeled P64, whereas part A and B are on the same sheet, not separate. P64B are pallets.





Here is an assembly 'jig' I came up with to get not only the posts square, but with a 1/32" reveal back from the front edge. Now, I need to clarify something here. The 'plans of the dock show the front posts flush with the front face. The picture they have of the finished model shows a relief, and there is a small diagram of their typical assembly of all their kits, and they specifically point out a 1/32" relief. My thought here is: why do they show it flush on the drawings everywhere else? So, going with what would look better once the cross braces are on, I am going with the relief.

This picture shows the set-up, of a part drying, of the front post assembly:


Here is that set-up broken apart to better illustrate how I put it together. The dock is being assembled upside down (note the 'T' on the decks, this is the top, and will be facing down for this assembly). I used two 12" scales clamped together against 2 long steel blocks. These measure 1/64" a piece, so 2 are 1/32". They are set high enough on the blocks to clear both the 1/4" glass and the thickness of the dock. I put a little glue on the stringers with a toothpick and placed the post assembly on them, slide it against the blocks, then add another block behind that to hold it all in place, rather than hold the just glued back posts. Then I placed a 1/4" square block inside the assembly and held that against the front posts to keep it square against the scales. So in effect, I am holding 3 things while the glue sets up, the front blocks against the glass, the back one to hold the dock in place and the center piece to keep the posts square. Got that??? I'm so glad.




Also, one thing you need to do before you glue the posts in place is file off the nibs on the back side.


One piece or deck, I forget which (and you will know if you have the kit), you need to glue the side post in first, and it does go flush. And this is how I did that one.


Then I came back and added the longer back piece which butts up against the end piece. The other end posts go on later, or so they say.


Adding the decking after is pretty easy, but make sure you do it against a block to get it even with the back.


Here is a long shot of the deck that has the posts to support the roof. There are 3 separate sections (deck posts) to go in front, spaced between the 'roof supporting post' slots, and the idea I have for keeping the 1/32" relief particularly comes in handy for this part.


Another note, a few 'back posts' need to go against a slot cut in the top face of the deck, to show that on the bottom side where you will be gluing it, take a razor blade to the slot and roll it over the edge to the back side. Makes it easier to see when you glue things down.




Now everything is done, place the decking around your foundation to see if you need to fix anything. In my case, I need to add a small piece of stripwood to one wall to cover the exposed gap, because that one foundation piece didn't go in square. Easy fix at this stage.




Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2516 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/01/2017 :  1:57:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And moving right along!

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16595 Go to Top of Page
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