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Author Previous Topic: final pics of the scratch built bed and breakfast Topic Next Topic: So I wanted to make white decals...
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Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  07:19:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
OK, Now I am starting a new build, Sokol's from Bar Mills (but you knew that when you just clicked on the thread).

Anyway, I don't know what I will do differently to this kit, it seems good enough just as is. And I like it. But, I am a long way from finishing, so we'll see.

Already, in the instructions, which are very comprehensive, it seems, I have come across a problem or two. So if you have the kit and haven't started yet here are some additional notes.

First, for those who are not familiar with it, what does it look like? Well, here it is:



The first thing to do in the instructions, is add some bracing to the rear of the 5 walls. Yep, 5 walls.



But they don't really explain what the small bracing pieces are until the next page. The bottom of the overhung area calls for some 1/16" stripwood offset by the thickness of the roof, about .045".

OK, so the little bits are 1/16", but the roof section is not .045". More like .068". It looks like they strengthened them up by laminating 2 cards together for a stronger roof. All fine and well, but what do I do with the .045" offset? Going up more will put the 1/16" stripwood over the windows. Using the .045" offset as gospel, would leave the roof sticking below the building edge. Difficult decision to make when there are inconsistencies.



So, what I did was replace the 1/16" stripwood for some thinner stock of my own, after measuring the gap on the wall to the window, subtracting the .063", I think I came up with about .040", so I got a piece of 4x8 I think, that was that thickness, and used that.

Now after looking at the picture of the completed kit, there is some trim below that section, so...was it worth that trouble, will the trim but up against the roof piece? Not now, if that what was intended, but that wasn't mentioned, and that may be why they increased the roof thickness. I don't know. Either way, it's done, and I will have to deal with that later. I can always add a small piece of stripwood to the bottom of the 4x8 later if needed. So not a complete disaster either way.

So here is a sample of the bracing.


Now, after a little bit, in the instructions, they say the wall edges need to be beveled. Both sides of number 4 and 5 wall sections. I hate to disagree, but I disagree. The 2 walls, #4 and 5, butt up against each other, and the angle is only about 4 degrees, so the sanding is going to be very small in this area, almost not worth it. I did a little, but more to clean up the edges. The opposite sides, adjacent to #4 and 5, are #'s 1 and 3, and these do need sanding as they require a tight flush fit, as you can see here:



To make it more clear for me, and a step to follow, I drew out the exact angles that are required off the wall intersection. They are not even angles, one is 56 degrees, the other is 39, which comes to 95 degree together, taking off the odd 5 degrees from the other 2 walls, you have your 90 degrees. So my marked lines are 1/2 those two angles.

You might ask why I did this...well, we need to sand the edges of those walls, and these now make a good template or jig to get the angles close. Or close enough.

I found, rather than go by the kit instructions of using a block plane to plane the edges down, I used a sander block. But if you lay the wall face down on a wood board, with a sharp edge, lay the "template" near the wall, and align the sander block with that line you drew, and lightly sand until the whole edge is sanded.



Hopefully, you should end up with two nicely sanded edges that butt up nice and square. Not very hard to do, just take it slow, it will become easy.



Well, that's all I have for now. On to the next step. I hope things will go a little easier.

They did say in the instructions from the get go that this is a difficult kit, and only those with some experience should tackle it. I feel I am at that point, and am eagerly waiting to see how this unfolds. They also said if you don't have the experience, put it away until you do. I hope this tutorial will help those that are not quite there yet, as well as those who are.
Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  08:12:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

This should be another fabulous build Tony. Looking forward at following along...

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1063 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  08:26:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Good ole' Bar Mills. Inconsistencies Tony? I'd say you'll remedy that, but it is frustrating to open a kit that needs fixin...

I'll be along....



Country: USA | Posts: 2224 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2016 :  08:40:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,

This new building looks great. I will be following along on your progress. Glad to see your changes and so far, a good tutorial.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2586 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:03:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob, Carl and Rich.

Thanks for coming along for the ride. My hope is that I can provide help to those wanting to build this kit, and giving others the courage to give one a try.

How hard can it be???


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:09:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

I expect this will turn out to be another masterpiece in your hands. And of course you will follow the instructions throughout . . . Wait a minute, you've already made changes!

Seriously though--if that's possible--when I look at the box-front photo at the top of this page it looks like the builder had Some problems or did not take enough care. I think they needed your notes.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2584 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:10:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Love these Bar Mills kits Tony, they are well made, the right size for home layouts, and the Company is up front on giving mention to the person who had the idea. One company left still with morals.
Also a pleasure following along on your construction process with your builds.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 17353 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:24:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great tutorial and introduction to the kit. I'm really impressed by your discussion about reviewing any kits instructions prior to actually starting the build. The tutorial on how to critically review and "fully understand" the instruction sheet is of significant importance.

I suspect that many modelers usually just read the instruction manuals to obtain a general understanding of the construction sequence. Here you have shared how it's important to understand the 'how' components fit together as well as the construction progression. Well done.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7037 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:40:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

I expect this will turn out to be another masterpiece in your hands. And of course you will follow the instructions throughout . . . Wait a minute, you've already made changes!

Seriously though--if that's possible--when I look at the box-front photo at the top of this page it looks like the builder had Some problems or did not take enough care. I think they needed your notes.

Mike



Now you mention it, Mike, I see a couple of things that I would not allow. A window falling out, top trim of differing sizes. Maybe more...


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:43:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris and Louis, thank you so much. It's good to know I hit the approval button.

Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Jeff Compton
Engine Wiper

Premium Member

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  10:48:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just finished this kit a few months ago. I loved the angles and look of this kit. Looks like I should have waited for your build! I remember having some trouble with the roof and I think I also swapped out some of the pieces for smaller ones I had. Looking forward to seeing what you do with the kit. I always have enjoyed building Bar Mills kits!
Jeff



Country: | Posts: 276 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2016 :  11:40:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good God he's off and running! Couldn't wait till the New Year to get started.

Looks like a great start Tony. I'll be following along.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9346 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  12:34:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Compton

I just finished this kit a few months ago. I loved the angles and look of this kit. Looks like I should have waited for your build! I remember having some trouble with the roof and I think I also swapped out some of the pieces for smaller ones I had. Looking forward to seeing what you do with the kit. I always have enjoyed building Bar Mills kits!
Jeff



Feel free to post some pictures Jeff, if you have any.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  12:36:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Good God he's off and running! Couldn't wait till the New Year to get started.

Looks like a great start Tony. I'll be following along.



LOL, that's funny. Thanks for dropping in. At this particular time, I am deciding on color, whether to use artists paints, craft paints, or my very old almost never opened Floquil refer white, as they used.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  3:58:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I started out by first making sure I had enough bracing on the back, just in case, to make sure I don't have any warping. I always use 91% alcohol when I stain sheet goods, even without bracing, I never get any warping. Actually, even with my painting method, I still don't. It goes on light, more a dry brush technique, than an all out paint job. If I want more paint, i come back with a second coat, but I find this alone produces a good faded look. The india ink I used is Higgins, and in this bottle, it is double strength, which is a little darker than the 1 tsp mix, and I prefer it over the weaker one. The first picture shows one that is still a bit wet, the other dry, just from the ink/alcohol mix. It dries pretty quick.



This second picture shows all the pieces done, no warping.



Here is a picture after painting. (07)
It looks like it would also make a great background building with the walls joined as shown.
I ended up using craft white paint. The Floquil was drying up on me too quickly and I couldn't control it. The color difference turned out to be negligible. With the water based paint, I kept adding a little water to keep it flowing well. Even then, I used very little and sort of scrubbed it in rather than just paint it on, so, to do this effectively, I used a very short bristle brush I usually use for scrubbing in weathering powders. It works better than a soft flowing brush.





Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2572 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/29/2016 :  5:16:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
You're off to leaps and bounds. Another method that works well is adding some windshield washer fluid to your brush as you paint on color. That seems to also make the craft paint flow better, especially on wood. I've never tried it on any other medium. There's no need to try to find acrylic thinner, since it's not readily available and it is a cheaper alternative. Another great tip From Karl O. I was thinking of your merthod so chosen would get too much paint in areas that you wouldn't want, perhaps too thick.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2586 Go to Top of Page
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