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 HO scale rolling stock by Bill Gill
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CavalryTrooper25
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/21/2017 :  10:18:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Bill;

You are welcome. Mantua/Tyco has also used this car as a hauler for preformed concrete pipe sections, but the model is based on a prototype that was designed for early rolled steel coils. I forget which RR it was, but it was a mid Atlantic region RR that took older 36, and 40 foot flats, and converted them to haul rolled steel coils.

Horse




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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/21/2017 :  10:28:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I got some 1/32 lead sheet from Rotometals.com if you're looking for a source.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6571 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/21/2017 :  11:38:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks again, Horse. I missed your first two comments about leaving the bent brake staff as is and, now having seen several prototype photos like that, I agree and am leaving it alone. Thanks.
Also thanks for the info on sheet lead for weights. I have a medium sized piece of lead flashing a contractor friend salvaged and gave me and your technique sounds like a good way to prepare and attach it.

Thanks, Dave, always good o have sources for supplies.



Country: USA | Posts: 1924 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/22/2017 :  10:06:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Horse, Post photos of your cars when done.



Bill;

Pretty far down the project roster, but if I do ever get to it, I will.

Thanks

Horse



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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/22/2017 :  10:29:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Horse, I know what you mean. This thread has several projects that will get updated or become new posts, but none are progressing at present.


Country: USA | Posts: 1924 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/27/2017 :  1:54:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Horse, I know what you mean. This thread has several projects that will get updated or become new posts, but none are progressing at present.



One of my current projects is to take 1970s/80s Roco Netherlands State Railway, trash container hauling style cars, and modify them to U.S. railroad standards. I then paint them to look similar to the container cars planned, although never actually built, for use by the County government solid waste authority here in my area. They built a huge transfer station, so that all local trash haulers could come to a single location for tipping. The material was segregated, then hauled out to the landfill, a co-generation incinerator plant, or a composting facility.

Where they built the transfer station, in the early 60s was right at the, then PRR, freight yard, as it was part of their long term plan to use rail to haul the stuff, rather than large fleets of tractor trailer units. They had planned to use high sided gondolas for such things as construction waste, and other heavier material that would not blow out, and haul it directly to the landfill, for dumping.

The trash, material that was not compostable, but needed to be dealt with would be hauled to the incinerator burned, to create steam, the steam drives turbines, making electricity. The ash would then pneumatically be blown into covered hoppers, taken down to the landfill, and, again, pneumatically unloaded, and blown unto the landfill level for disposition.

All the compostable material would be hauled to the composting facility, which was to be co-located with the co-generation incinerator. Unloaded, ground to a fine meal, and mixed with water, and enzymes to rot more quickly into high quality soil.

Unfortunately, the Federal government (EPA) intervened, making it financially impossible to actually complete.

The landfill exists, where it had been, right next to a major secondary rail line. The co-generation plant was built a few miles north of the landfill, along the same rail line. As previously mentioned, the transfer station was built at the area freight yard. Even the land was bought for the composting facility, at the same time the land for the co-gen plant was bought. The freight cars were all designed, bid proposals let, and accepted, and funding means worked out. The PRR, later Penn Central, even had offered to set aside a fleet of six GP class locomotives, specifically to haul the trains of the special cars around.

Then the mighty EPA nixed the overall plan, over their "fear" of potential ground water contamination from the composting operations. Even when the local authority was willing to work with the EPA to meet their concerns, the EPA refused to sign off on the licensing, and the plan collapsed.

Now, instead of moving the trash, ash, and compost by rail, it all goes by truck, the volume of material has increased significantly since the late 70s, and EPA looks like the bureaucratic morons they are for failing to see the future.

Oh well, so on my buddies layout, we run trains as if the plan had gone into full effect, and I am currently making the compostable material hauling cars.

Horse




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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/28/2017 :  3:18:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Shown earlier in this series are two NEB&W 40 ft flatcars (based on Rutland prototypes) carrying chunks of marble from a quarry to a processing site. Below is a NEB&W 36 ft flatcar (also based on Rutland prototype) carrying crates of finished marble.

This project started with Funaro and Camerlengo resin kit 6492.


I did not think that finished marble would be shipped any distance simply lying flat and stacked up on the car as depicted in this box top photo, so changes were made.


This photo of Proctor, VT shows stacks of crated marble pieces. Most were probably shipped in boxcars as seen on the lower right edge of this photo from the Rensselaer Model Railroad Society collection. But some appears to have been shipped on flatcars, as dimly seen just ahead of the boxcar.



Having a visible load is more interesting for operators during club sessions, so I added low temporary sides to the flat car to secure the crates of marble. The sides are based on a composite of the few photos we have showing loads like this. Here is another one from the collection (photo by Bob Nimke).


Here's my version of crates of finished marble loaded on flatcar





The finished kit was very light weight and I did not have a good way to hide much weight under the car, so the raised sides and crates hide a steel weight salvaged from and old junk kit. Because of that, the crates in the load are less than full height.

John Nehrich suggested I make a few full size crates as masters to cast a bunch of crates and stack them up like in the photo above of the overhead crane at Proctor. I made a dozen masters out of styrene. The front sides of some of these crates are different from their back sides, providing a bigger variety of crates to stack up.







Edited by - Bill Gill on 03/28/2017 4:10:19 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1924 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/28/2017 :  6:08:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The masters look good, Bill.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

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Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 03/28/2017 :  6:12:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All of this looks really good to me, Bill!

Pete
in Michigan




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Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 03/28/2017 :  6:17:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill, really interesting looking flatcar load with that marble on it.
Your masters look like they are ready for the mold making process.
What's that figure doing? looks like he's about to christen your masters

Greg Shinnie



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quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/28/2017 :  6:48:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like your loader can't find the outhouse'.
That is a very realistic car and load Bill'. Not to mention, that is very nice looking scenery as well'..Interesting and well done build'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 5052 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/28/2017 :  7:22:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bruce & Pete.

Greg & Ted, That's Stanley (Stan) Dird. He shows up in some of my photos sort of like Charlie shows up in Bob Santos' posts and that ensign guy in the white uniform shows up inspecting other models, except Stan just stands around to provide a sense of scale. Ooriginally he was a rubbery Life-Like Scene Master guy with a jackhammer who always seemed to be hanging around whenever photos were being taken.

His pose does look a bit suspicious there



Edited by - Bill Gill on 03/28/2017 7:26:07 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1924 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/28/2017 :  9:34:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A unique load and well executed, Bill. However, if you had used real marble you wouldn't have the weight problem.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14120 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2017 :  08:31:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George...very good point! And, I actually did get thin scraps of white Vermont marble from a nearby stone shop to cut to HO size, but the club nixed using it for the load because the grains in marble are too coarse and gave the pieces an unreal look in close up photos. I thought about painting them, but didn't have a lot of confidence that the styrene "crates" would stay securely glued to the painted marble when subject to handling during op session setups.

The "marble" for this load is scraps of Azek, a PVC material used for house trim. Solvent glued the crates to the marble, and all the crates are also glued to a 0.01" styrene base that just fits inside the gray sides of the flatcar. That way the load seems pretty solid.



Edited by - Bill Gill on 03/29/2017 08:37:42 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 1924 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 03/29/2017 :  09:26:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Interesting car load Bill.


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