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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/20/2016 :  6:10:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This thread groups together the various rolling stock posts have made on the forums. Future posts will be added to this thread to keep everything in one place.

Here are the links to the earlier posts:

HO Civil War gondola project
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46254

Freelanced 'homebuilt' boxcar
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=45377

Pulp Fiction: two freelanced cars for the C&V RR
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46870

Two HO gondola pulpwood loads
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=44605

three bobbers for the C&V
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46011

Country: USA | Posts: 1555

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/20/2016 :  6:38:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just before starting this new thread I posted three new photos on this old thread:

Pulp Fiction: two freelanced cars for the C&V RR
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46870

Here's one more old post with photo of rolling stock I modeled for the NEB&W that got missed:
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46190&whichpage=1



Edited by - Bill Gill on 07/21/2016 4:50:40 PM

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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 07/20/2016 :  7:29:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One stop shopping browsing, I like it.


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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/20/2016 :  7:39:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like the index. It's helpful for those of us who find someone we want to follow on builds and use their techniques. Thanks for posting.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 6952 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/20/2016 :  8:18:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Frank & KP. Glad it's useful. helps me quickly keep track of stuff too.


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Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 07/20/2016 :  9:24:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's BG's greatest hits vol.1
No jive talkin' here.

Greg Shinnie



Edited by - Ensign on 07/20/2016 9:30:08 PM

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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/21/2016 :  4:47:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Greg - the best are yet to happen I hope :)


Edited by - Bill Gill on 07/21/2016 4:48:36 PM

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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2016 :  08:12:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A resin gondola from a kit on my layout. I modified the ends so the stamped end pattern was also on the inside of the car, but couldn't find a simple solution to add rivets on the interior of the sides. (Rivet decals didn't match the pattern on the ribs and there are over 100 rivets needed so didn't want to add all of them with dots of epoxy as on other cars). But I did carve some dents on the interior that matched the molded in bumps on the exterior; they are very shallow and don't show well under this lighting. May hide the interior with a load of scrap.




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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2016 :  09:07:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill,

Very nice. Good job on the ends and weathering.

Now that it's complete maybe Archer will issue just the right rivet pattern.

Gons offer a wide scope for good modeling, as you have shown.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2280 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2016 :  06:40:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike.


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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2016 :  07:05:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is closer look at one of the pair of dedicated marble service flat cars I detailed for the NEB&W RR. They were the subject of an article in the NOV 2015 issue of RMC. Their starting point was the same Athearn 40 ft flatcar kit (the one with that unusual brake fixture on the end) that was the base for my C&V pulpwood cars.

That blue box flatcar approximates the Rutland prototype fairly closely. Small changes included adding permanently mounted timbers on the decks as stand off blocks for the marble slabs, redoing the brake wheel mounting and adding a few rivets to the ends and sides to match the prototype. Wire grab irons and metal corner steps were added. No changes were made to the brake components under these cars because none of that is visible under normal operations and these are cars for operating sessions, not display. The cars were numbered for their Rutland prototypes but lettered for the NEB&W.

Side view of NEB&W 2792. The streaks of marble dust are actual marble dust from Proctor, VT, where these cars saw most of their service.



Close up of added rivets in areas marked by blue arrowheads. The rivets are dots of thick Cyanoacrylate applied to match the size and spacing of the prototype. Archer rivet decals were too big and too far apart to match the Athearn molded on rivets.





National Railway Appliance, Feasible Drop Brake Shaft on a flat car, photo from public domain



My approximation of the Feasible Drop Brake Shaft of the National Railway Appliance Company that I believe is the brake mount used on the prototypes. (Note, new rivets and uncoupling lever have yet to be added to the car end).



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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2016 :  09:03:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey Bill,

Nice detail job on that flat car.

I had started working on a Rutland flat and gondola a while back. IIRC there was an article back in either RMC or MR on modifying an Athearn flat car into a Rutland. I'll have to see if I can find that article.

How did you go about making those rivets. I'm interested in methodology of making those rivets. Thanks.

Bernd



Edited by - Bernd on 07/25/2016 09:05:53 AM

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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2016 :  10:43:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bernd, Thanks for taking a look. The article you saw may have been mine about detailing two of these cars. It was in the NOV 2015 RMC. John Nehrich had also detailed the same Athearn 40 ft flatcar kits for the NEB&W in his article in the JAN 1986 issue of MR. John added "rivets" using a technique from that time of embossing small dents in the cars' sides with a needle. In photos taken from normal viewing distances the dents looked like raised rivet heads. They looked like small holes in close up photos.

Here's how the rivets on these cars were done:
1. I traced dots for each new rivet pattern onto small pieces of clear frosted tape stuck onto the Athearn side so their spacing would match the Athearn rivets, then stuck the pieces on the cars where the new rivets would go.
2. Using a fine sewing needle I lightly poked very small divots into the car sides through the dots on the tape.
3. The tape was removed and any residual adhesive that might have stuck to the car sides was cleaned off with alcohol. Don't skip that step even if you don't see any adhesive because just a little adhesive will cause problems during the next step.
4. For these flat cars I used a thick cyanoacrylate that I let sit briefly in a little pool on a scrap piece of plastic to thicken up a bit more. However, since then I have switched to using JB Weld epoxy and like it better. The CA set very quickly and it was almost impossible to adjust the size of the rivet if the first attempt wasn't just right, but with the JB Weld, if a rivet head is too big it can be carefully wiped off and redone. If a rivet head is too small, you can add a tiny bit more to it because the epoxy has a much longer working time than the CA.

(You can see an example of the JB Weld rivets on page 2 of the thread:
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46870

5. Using a fine sewing needle held in a pin vise, I dipped the tip into the pool of CA (or JB Weld) and carefully lowered it until the just the glue -not the needle - touched the dent. Practicing on scraps is essential so you can get a consistent dot of glue to transfer onto each dent. Do not try to do more than one rivet per dip into the glue pool. If the glue begins to build up on the needle, wipe it of completely so the needle will pick up the same amount with each dip. The dents in the car side keep the glue in place and the glue naturally forms a rounded rivet-like head as it sets. Lay the piece aside with the rivet heads facing up until the glue cures and you're good to go.

This technique works well when you are trying to match rivet patterns and sizes that aren't available (yet) in decals. It might sound tedious, but once you get a rhythm going, you can move along at a reasonable (slow) pace.



Edited by - Bill Gill on 07/25/2016 10:49:22 AM

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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2016 :  1:37:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill,

Thanks for that SBS procedure. Going to have to try it on those unfinished cars.

BTW, it was the John Nehrich article in the JAN 1986 issue of MR that I followed. Never got as far as the rivets. Your method of making rivets might just get me to finish that project. Thanks.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2116 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/27/2016 :  07:50:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd, Glad the rivet idea can help finish your cars. Here's a look at the JB Weld epoxy rivets added to the side of the pulpwood car. Try experimenting with that if you have it, it is easier to use and to correct goofs than thick CA.




Country: USA | Posts: 1555 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 07/27/2016 :  07:56:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This CP flatcar got a lumber load for NEB&W operating sessions.

The load was based on Noel Holley’s “Lumber Loads from the 1940’s & 50’s” (Model Railroader - Feb ‘57) and Greg Martin’s & Paul Chandler’s “Accurate Lumber Loads” (Mainline Modeler - Feb ‘91). Online photos also helped.


The load was made from solid blocks of maple that were scribed, embossed and selectively stained on all visible sides to look like stacks of various lengths of ‘two by’ spruce. The car was part of an article in the NOV 2012 RMC.




Edited by - Bill Gill on 07/27/2016 07:57:38 AM

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