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Author Previous Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR Topic Next Topic: New W&N
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/18/2019 :  11:20:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The mill itself should be pretty easy to build from sheet clapboard siding (Mt Albert or NESL). What I'm interested in, though, is lumber storage. Looks like a shed behind the mill, and stacks of lumber to the left. Seems to me in the 'olden days' most lumber was stored outside exposed to the elements. At least I can't find a lot of photos of sheds or other covered storage for either raw wood or things like millwork.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7737 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/18/2019 :  1:26:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Dave!

I'll likely go with a photo printed mock-up for starters. Later I'll decide whether to go with styrene/etc, or simply make a more detailed photo print structure. Once I have a mock-up structure I will re-align the two tracks on the north end of Jack Fork to allow the structure to sit between the tracks. One track for inbound wood, the other for outbound.

I think you're right that early on lumber was simply stored outside, or at least so in the Ozark and Quachita regions. In my Ozark and Ouachita history books, I don't start seeing drying sheds until after the turn of the century. Toward the 1930s there were some HUGE ones in the Ouachita region.

All fer now!

Gotta quit playing and go do some lawn work.

Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 06/18/2019 1:27:43 PM

Country: | Posts: 812 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/18/2019 :  6:57:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So while bouncin' along on the Cub Cadet, I was rollin' some things over in my mind about the layout. As I did, I'm coming to the realization that I really like this particular aspect about a dual era layout:

* I think it's going to be fun to try to portray the passage of time and vast differences in the Ozarks between the 1880s and 1960s.

You see, one of the things I find so fascinating about railroading in the 19th century is that "no place" now, was "Someplace" back then.

I think it will be fun (and rewarding) to illustrate such differences.

Thus, I'm began thinking in terms that I just might populate my 1880s towns with some modest structures a bit more than I first envisioned. By doing so, I think it will enhance the enjoyment of the 1960s era that much more: Vacant lots where wooden falsefront buildings stood, perhaps the decaying remnant of one, such things as that.

So, once the lawn work was done, as soon as I could, I gathered up some "small town" structures I've had for years and out to the Hut to mock up a scene or two. First thing I learned was that the Model Power brick buildings were bigger than I thought AND looked way too "modern" for a mountain town in the Ozarks back in the 1880s. SO, that was that for those structures!

Over to my stash of Kibri "Wild West" 3-pack kits...

Ah hah... this box of buildings looks like a good grouping for Jack Fork!

Out came the "Tacky Tack" and soon I had the walls and roofs Tacky Tacked together and the structures placed where I would like to use them.

Yup... THAT'S what I've got in mind!

Suddenly, there was more "life" and thus "activity" to the town of Jack Fork. (In the 1960s era, the building spots will be vacant lots, and will be referred to as where "old Jack Fork" was located.)

If your imagination is good enough that you can overlook the garish bare plastic and structures devoid of windows/details, here's the trio I'm learning toward using at Jack Fork:



If I go through with this idea and use this grouping, then I will want to use "finer" details and such so the structures won't look as "clunky" as the stock kits.

BUT, it's not just Jack Fork. I'm thinking about using another Kibri 3-pack up at Piney Gap (when I get there), and over at Mountain Springs.

So, there you have it: The latest musings of a madman!!

Bwahahahahaahhhaaaaa!


Andre



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 06/18/2019 :  7:35:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks good. Sunglasses help.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/18/2019 :  8:06:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I suggest you avoid straight lines and evenness when you layout your towns. Old towns weren't plum like they became with the introduction of Zoning laws.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5223 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:38:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike:

A little on the "bright" side, eh? That orange one is the worst. I don't like the extra step on the porches of the two smaller ones. If I go through with this idea, I may just make new walkways. We shall see!

Bob:

Not quite understanding the "straight lines" and "evenness". I see a lot of straight line false front buildings in my 19th century pictures?
What doesn't come through well in the photo is that the buildings are not parallel with the bench work edge. They're at a slight angle to it.

However, I'm just experimenting, and for now only at Jack Fork. What I "see" in my mind for Piney Gap, Mountain Springs, and Ozarka will be considerably different than Jack Fork.

Run Times...

So tonight I played some more with my trains. This time, I thought I'd get some run times from the end of track (which is very near the summit) down the grade to Ozarka, the southernmost modeled town. I was curious as to what sorts of run times so as to give me an idea of what fast-time ratio to consider.

First up was a light engine move from the top to the bottom. I kept the speed between 15-20 MPH. Typically, timetable speeds were reduced for mountainous terrain containing heavy grades, so I felt this was in keeping.

The little #119 4-4-0 made the run in 4 min 48 sec. Had I been able to start at the summit, it would have been about 5 minutes run time at 15-20 MPH.

Next was a helper freight upgrade. I held the speed to about 10-12 MPH to simulate working the grade. From Ozarka to the end of track just below the summit was 7 min 29 sec.

Armed with these figures, I can now look at fast time options:

At 12:1 fast time (5 min = 1 hr), it would have taken the light engine almost one fast time "hour" to drop off the grade down to Ozarka.

The helper freight took right at 1 1/2 fast hours to make it.

At 12:1 time ratio, a timed "scale" mile (aka "smile") equals 5 feet. Thus from Ozarka to the summit at Piney would be about 12 "smiles".

A 6:1 fast hour is 10 minutes, and a "smile" is 10 feet. Thus, one would half the above times and distances to see what 6:1 would do.

As has been the case in the past, it appears that 12:1 would be my best option. This will allow ample time factor to represent significant length and still be acceptable in view of the time required to make switch moves. An added advantage to 12:1 is that you can use a standard face clock and each number represents an hour. To wit: You can start the fast clock at midnight (minute hand on 12) and one real hour later it's 12 PM. 24 hours would be two actual hours. With 12:1, you can know what "time" it is at a glance.

Dadgum. Late-thirty already.

Time to cut this off and shuffle off to bed.

Night all!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 812 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  11:22:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Congdon Stacks:

In all the years I've collected/viewed TOC19 Ozark railroad pictures, I've never seen a Congdon stack. I was going to use a few when I was going to do Colorado... but I ain't doin' Colorado no more. In fact, I just finished replacing the Congdon stack that was on one of my 4-4-0's with an MDC small diamond. (Looks much more appropriate.) SO...

I'm going to have a small supply of MDC's Congdon stacks left over. I don't have a use for them, nor do I foresee a use for them. IF you want them, let me know and I'll package them up and send them to you.

Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 06/19/2019 11:23:01 AM

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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/19/2019 :  11:31:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I started operations on my B&M Eastern Route at 6:1, but had to cut back to 4:1 (slowest my clock will go). My switch jobs are planned for 10-15 setouts/pickups per 8-hour trick, but there are passenger trains to keep clear of. I've found a few operators for whom switching is intuitive enough that they can do 6:1, and it's beautiful to watch them. Many others need time to think between moves.


Country: USA | Posts: 5899 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:16:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi jbvb:

Thanks for your experiential input.

6:1 is attractive, but it shore do shorten the (mental) "travel time element" of a route. How large is your layout? I will be doing good to have 150' of usable main. Probably more like 120'.

What are you using for a fast clock? Given that my dual eras I'll be doing (1880s/1960s) pre-date digital timepieces, I was going to use a white-faced "standard" looking battery powered clock as I have in the past. Said clock works well with 12:1.


Andre



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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:38:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andre,
Take a closer look at those pictures. For example the one you shared of Winslow. The buildings are not square to each other or have the exactly same setback from the street. There's no common sidewalk ether. Not even a wood one.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5223 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:39:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Strictly FWIW...

Possible name change. I'm not as enamored with the name "Ozark & Southern" for my 1880s theme as I was. Couple things, one of them being the space it takes to put such a name on these tiny tender sides. Takes three lines, like this:

Ozark
&
Southern

Also, it's awfully close to an old friend's freelance HO scale "Ozark Southern". I'm leaning toward the name "Ozark Central". Easier to say, to the point. Has a good "railroady" ring to it. However, two other names are in the running, but share the same (if not worse) situation as the name Ozark & Southern. They would be:

Ozark
&
Arkansas River

Ozark
&
Arkansas Valley

In the prototype world, there was a line that originated in the Ozarks, then headed west into Indian Territory (I.T. became Oklahoma in Nov of 1907) by the name "Ozark & Cherokee Central". Cool name. But, it does set precadence for the use of the term "Central" in the name of a line in the Ozarks.

What say ye? Am I overthinking again? (Overthinking? No... not ME!)

Andre "Let Me Think On This Some More" Ming

EDIT: The illustrated lettering scheme for the tender sides was spaced correctly in the editing software, but doesn't make the transition to the post.



Edited by - OK Hogger on 06/19/2019 12:45:54 PM

Country: | Posts: 812 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:44:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob:

Ah, I've gotcha' now. Yes, I "see" what you're talking about. Easy to address once the time comes. I do want some wooden walkways, and they were evidenced in the Ozarks, so some form of wooden porches may survive for this particular scene, however the supplied ones may not in their current form.

All fer now! Out to piddle in the Hut.


Having fun in OK,

Andre



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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/19/2019 :  12:59:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The Eastern Route only has about 110 feet of main line, with four passenger stops, two of which are flag stops and skipped by expresses. Passenger ops are pretty leisurely except for the meets. I bought a GML ( http://www.thegmlenterprises.com/id19.html ) clock controller and two circular white-faced analog clock displays. I haven't tried resetting the fast time manually, but it might be possible given the clock units they started with. It does take a particular kind of attention to be productive while watching the clock out of the corner of your eye so as to stop it just before 12.


Country: USA | Posts: 5899 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  2:06:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
jbvb:

Interesting! The initial sticker shock will likely wear off as I mull this over, but GML's products look to be the "deluxe" solution. I would sure like to have that miniature "Regulator" style clock!



That clock would be excellent for my 1880s era, and still useable for my early 1960s era. (Traditional railroading was still in heavy evidence in the early 1960s, one of the reasons I'm drawn to it for a diesel era.)

Thanks a bunch! I may need to budget one of those into my scheme of things.

Andre





Edited by - OK Hogger on 06/19/2019 2:10:33 PM

Country: | Posts: 812 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/19/2019 :  3:43:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob:

Sort of like this?



Started installing L-brackets for the upper level...





All fer now!

Andre



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