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Author Previous Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR Topic Next Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy
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OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/15/2019 :  5:24:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike:

Yes. A northern range of the Ouachitas: The Poteau Mountain Range. I'm quite impressed that you know about the Ouachitas!

The Ozarks and Ouachitas are similar, but do have notable differences. There's far more pines in the Ouachitas than the Ozarks, AND all the ranges run east/west in the Ouachitas, whereas they're quite tumbled in the Ozarks. I love 'em both. Back in the day, my favorite regional railroad (Frisco) ran through both, with helpers sections in both during the steam days.

Bob:

The challenge is that I need to mesh with the incomplete main L-girder structure that used the previous grade of lumber I purchased. Why the two lumber batches don't match is a long and sordid story that I'll try to condense:

The Ollie's Lumber store in Poteau had the dimensional White Fir that I've used thus far. They've had it for years, and apparently, was ordered by mistake or something... but I happened along and purchased all of it after I saw the quality of it. None of us gave it a thought about its actual dimensions, for we all "assumed" it "1x2's". Well, once at the Pocola Ollie's Lumber store, we've now learned that it was NOT common 1x2's. (1x2's: Which is a misnomer in itself, for lumber runs smaller than the referenced numbers.) Instead, the stuff I've been using is was planed to be very uniform. It's some sort of "trim" wood made for precise trim work. (Just like I was doing.) Very high quality. What I've just purchased from the Pocola Ollie's Lumber is good quality "sure 'nuf" White Fir 1x2's, and thus its just fractionally larger. Such wood would be okay, fine and dandy in fact, BUT I need to transition to the new dimension seamlessly. (In other words the two different L-girders made from the different batches would be different heights, but resting on the same support structure, thus mismatched.)

I think I've figured out a way to make it work:

I think I can piece together enough of the "trim" lumber to make the last two needed L-girders and from there I can transition to the common 1x2's, for it will be on top of the all existing L-girders there were made with the "trim" wood. Doable, but going to cost me some time in that I'll need to redo a bit in order to insure I have the needed "trim" wood for the remaining two short pieces of L-girder constructed with the "trim" wood. From there on, I'll only need joists and/or L-girders that will not be a part of the existing L-girder framework.

What a tangled web the wood has woven!

SO, there we have it. It's not been without its drama, has it???

All fer now. Out to the Hut and start making it happen.

Andre




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jerryrbeach
New Hire

Posted - 03/16/2019 :  10:19:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andre,

FWIW, it seems like the dimensions of finished lumber vary. I assembled three modules last winter, purchasing the lumber from Lowe's. I bought a half dozen 1x4's that should have been 3 1/2" wide. I cut everything to length, mixing and matching to get the least amount of waste from the boards. Imagine my surprise when I went to assemble the "dominoes" when I found some boards were 3 1/2" wide, others a sixteenth less, and at least one a sixteenth wider. Not a big deal since I used a plywood top on each module, but something I certainly did not anticipate when I bought the lumber and started construction.

Your benchwork looks great and I am sure you will work this out successfully.


Jerry Beach

Country: USA | Posts: 23 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/16/2019 :  10:32:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Jerry:

Yes indeed. Varying sizes in lumber is a PITA in some forms of construction. I had a short stint at cabinet making back in the mid 1980s and there it was all about precision lumber. Learned to cut, plane, mill lumber so that it would be uniform.

That was what I loved about that dimensional lumber I was using: It was planed/milled and all sticks matched perfectly. Nice stuff. BUT, it's all used up, and now I'm making transition to the "new" lumber that I'll have to work with for the rest of the layout. It'll all be good when done. Just added a bit more head scratchin' to this phase. (And there's been PLENTY of that head scratchin' thing goin' on!)

Thanks for the kind words on the benchwork. I'm getting there. IF I make acceptable progress the next few work sessions, I should be ready to purchase hardboard for the false wall and plywood for the benchwork sometime this upcoming week.

All fer now.

Andre





Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/16/2019 :  4:24:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Update Time!

Well, that last bit of benchwork went quicker than I expected. At this point I think all of the basic framework for the lower level is finished. I think I'm ready to pick up four sheets of 1/8" hardboard and sheath the upper portion of the peninsula wall. Guess I'll pick up some hardboard Monday. That is, unless I decide to ride Monday also. We're going to have mild temps and no rain this week, so I'm intending to ride Tuesday and Thursday, and perhaps Monday, too. My favorite riding "seasons" are on the verge of winding down, so I'm going to take advantage of the good days before the rains return and the heat/humidity begin. BUT, I digress (again).

First pic...




You're looking at the horseshoe curve area. The entire horseshoe curve will be on grade. I switched to grid construction supported by L-girder here so I could create a "doughnut" (grid frame with a hole) so I can easily sit my butt down on a rolling scooter and scoot under and stand up unhindered for construction, and later for maintenance.


Here's a view looking from the opposite end...





Here's the presentation that will greet an operator when they leave either the lower or upper "terminals" and round the curve leading to the mountains...





I have intentionally divided the scenes so that when you stand on one side of the peninsula, you will not be able to see the other portion.

Lastly, here's a view from near the stage area (in back of the camera) that shows the peninsula wall that will be sheathed this week.




That stepped down wall portion is actually part of the support structure for the upper level at that point. (Had to stop the false wall short of that overhead light!) At that location of the upper peninsula, there will be the end of a mountain (rising well above eye level) for a view block to prevent seeing the other portion of the layout.

In all, I think the lower level framework phase is pretty much completed. Time to sheath that peninsula, then get plywood and start creating the sub bed.

All fer this 'un!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

jerryrbeach
New Hire

Posted - 03/18/2019 :  07:44:17 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Andre,

Your experience with cabinetry shows clearly in the design and execution of your bench work. I really like the clean look of your gusset plates and splices. Very professional from start to finish. (FWIW, I am not an early rail modeler, but I do like to check into this area of the forum to check out the wonderful modeling.)


Jerry Beach

Country: USA | Posts: 23 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 03/18/2019 :  1:40:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How exciting it is to see this good looking bench work going up.
Keep up the good work.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5141 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/18/2019 :  5:55:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jerry:

Thanks. As for cabinet making: I was actually assisting the main cabinet maker, but I learned quick and he was impressed with my precision and fits, so quite soon I was doing more of the actual cabinet work and he was doing all the decorative trim, and routing/shaping the moldings/etc for door construction and such. I actually enjoyed cabinet making and working with wood in general. Wouldn't have taken much for me to get into that, but my cabinet making/etc was only a "just passing through" time in my life.

Bob:

I hope to keep going and making good progress!

All:

I guess after I take care of some business in the morning, I'll go pick up the hardboard and get started sheathing that peninsula wall. I'm going to try something a bit different on the plywood sub-bed and Homasote:

I'm going to cut slabs of plywood that will accommodate the track plan and tack them in place onto the benchwork, sans risers. I will then cover same with slabs of Homasote tacked in place. Once the plywood/Homasote slabs are tacked in place, onto the Homasote I will transfer my track plan using a pencil, straight edges, a piece of lathing strip (for easements and creating broad curves), and my trammel. I will then cut BOTH the Homasote and plywood into the final outer dimensions at the same time, thus yielding borders that match nicely. From there, I can cookie-cut plywood/Homasote slab sandwich where needed. That done, once I pull the tacks from the Homasote, the plywood will be ready to install w/risers, and I can trim the unneeded portions of the Homasote to leave roadbed and places for sidings/spurs and such.

I may have made that sound confusing, but I've got it figured out in my head.

All fer now!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/23/2019 :  10:28:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Layout:

Progress is going going slow this past week. My motorcycle riding season is winding down (summer heat cometh), so I've been spending available days (not raining) on my motorcycle. Yesterday, the wife and I spent the entire day up in the Ozark mountains in our little Chevy "Colorado" pick up truck. It was a gorgeous day and we saw ALL sorts of wonderful scenes. (And had the best catfish lunch EVER.) Here's a few pics:







Today I will be installing hardboard and picking up two sheets of A-C plywood. However, slow going again next week, for it looks like I'll be riding 3 of the 5 days!

Other stuff...

Just saw this pic and it was too good to not share with my TOC19 buds here. This is apparently taken in Detroit, MI back about 1880 or earlier. IMHO, a really good picture of the rolling stock! Enjoy!



All fer now!

Andre



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/23/2019 :  12:35:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's also a good shot of an older overpass bridge.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7651 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 03/23/2019 :  2:58:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a great shot! Those cars look like I lettered them With individual letters. Love the overpass too. What a pain it would be to model with those steel rods passing through the wood work.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5141 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/10/2019 :  2:21:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Though I have been "distracted" with other interests, I HAVE been piddling along on the layout. Thought I'd post up some pics so you can see that progress IS being made... just at a slower rate for now.

First up here's a look down the left side of the peninsula:



And here's a view of the right side:




Looking at the horseshoe curve w/access opening:



And a look from inside the "mountains" scenes toward the horseshoe curve area:



I'm in the process of plotting the track center lines so I can see how the track will flow through the scenes, once I've finalized that, I will trim to excess plywood into circular edges at the curves.

All fer now!

Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 04/10/2019 2:22:33 PM

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/10/2019 :  3:40:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the update. Everything looks good.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5101 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/10/2019 :  5:09:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, she looking good Andre. You won't regret spending more for the plywood.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5141 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/10/2019 :  5:47:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mike and Bob!

Thanks for your encouragement.

Yes, Bob, the plywood is such a joy to work with. In some of my past efforts, I used the much cheaper C-D decking plywood. Never again.

Once I get the track center lines in place, I think I'll go forward in trimming the edges, then I'll cut/fit the Homasote "plates" and tack them in place, as well as cut out Homasote turn arcs for the turn sections. All Homasote tacked in place, onto it will go the final track center lines. That all done, pull the Homasote off and it's time to cookie cut the ply and elevate it to the gradients. The pre-cut Homasote will then be permanently installed on top of the plywood, and then it's track laying time again!

Getting there.

I'm not getting so obsessed with "progress at any cost" (which is a good thing, me thinks.), so I'm not feeling as rushed now. My goal is now to simply make consistent progress.

All fer now!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/11/2019 :  12:30:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OK Hogger

My goal is now to simply make consistent progress.




Ahy!, tis' the key to success, that be.



It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5141 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 53 Previous Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR Topic Next Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy  
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