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Author Previous Topic: San Juan Central Topic Next Topic: Modeling an entire roster... White Deer & Loganton
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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/17/2018 :  11:11:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Is this your thinking? The green line represents the road. Are you planning on adding the station on this level?



Bernd



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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/17/2018 :  11:56:37 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Probably off to the right, but never thought of it to the left. Likely to make the passing track tougher to deal with.

Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/17/2018 12:15:30 PM

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/17/2018 :  12:54:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
IMHO, the three tall building need to lose two stories. and I would move the station to the intersection of the two streets and about level with the front street. but, it's your railroad and be true to yourself.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5131 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/17/2018 :  3:13:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I like the new arrangement of streets and buildings with the variations in elevation. I tend to agree with Bob about the tall buildings. They sort of dominate the scene.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Edited by - Michael Hohn on 12/17/2018 3:14:50 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5094 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/20/2018 :  11:45:54 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
To help set the street's path, I grabbed whatever buildings i had available. I agree that the 5 story buildings seem out of place with two story buildings. In reality, its the two story buildings on the upper level that are likely to get replaced with three story structures. I would suspect most people would use smaller buildings to force a receding perspective.

I have the idea of towers and grain elevators dominating things vertically, and dwarfing the trains far below. I would have to admit being captivated by the way Malcolm Furlow would exaggerate vertical elements of his projects. I think he tended to over exaggerate for my tastes, but the thought of stretching the vertical element of space is something so few in model railroading seem to explore or take advantage of. I'm going to try.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/22/2018 7:57:01 PM

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/21/2018 :  12:47:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz



I have the idea of towers and grain elevators dominating things vertically, and dwarfing the trains far below.




It will also make the scene look much smaller.

Bob
























It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5131 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/21/2018 :  09:18:42 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
In my depiction, this is a harbor in a small city (or town) on the edge of Lake Ontario, compared to the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains and Rio Grande railroading, where small buildings add to the forced perspective of the terrain.

George Selios' Franklin and South Manchester RR would be a good example of the inspiration to have large background vs small foreground structures, but obviously on much more limited scale, as it is only a 9x9 U shaped room.

As previously referenced,and featured on this forum, Mark Dalrymple's Tellyknot Corner (pages 1-4) photos also added inspiration to the design.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/22/2018 7:59:26 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/22/2018 :  09:16:18 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Laid some track last night, and didn't even have to say "Baby, its cold outside."

The main line and yard tracks above the turntable are now in, as well as the yard lead, and lead to the harbor area.

I hate code 70 rail connectors

Dave


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/22/2018 :  12:34:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz


113731171100390
I hate code 70 rail connectors

Dave



Me too, I use N-scale Rail joiners.
Are pictures coming?

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5131 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/22/2018 :  12:50:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz


I hate code 70 rail connectors



I feel the same way. I use ME railjoiners, which I open up by slipping them onto a piece of code 70 rail thatís been tapered slightly and wiggling them back and forth. I do that a lot when joining Shinohara turnouts.

Iíve read that the newer railjoiners are a bit looser.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5094 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/22/2018 :  12:52:29 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
On the issue of the rail joiners, I usually have to open up the ends with an opticians screwdriver. I snuggle it onto one rail and solder that joiner onto the rail with a small amount if solder.

I found that way easier to slide the other rail into the connector without it dislodging. The risk of the method is getting solder into the slot of the rail connector. So the slightest amount of solder is used initially. Then once both sides are onto the joiner properly, the full joint is soldered properly.

Ill try to add some pics over the weekend, but Holiday prep will understandably take center stage.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/22/2018 1:46:11 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/22/2018 :  1:43:35 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
I just noticed I past the three year mark from when I started this thread.

Thank you to all who have been kind enough to follow along, and particularly to those who took the time to make constructive comments and post ideas. Whether the idea was used or not, your efforts to help make things better are greatly appreciated. Please keep them coming.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/22/2018 7:36:14 PM

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/22/2018 :  7:01:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I have a clear memory of the start of this thread. I was in Michigan at the time with my wife visiting her family. Had an interesting drive in snow but having grown up in the snow belt it was not a big deal.

Do you feel youíve made any changes to your original plans?

Mike



_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5094 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/22/2018 :  7:37:22 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Intersting question Mike.

Overall, from the original design shown in the opening post on page one, I would say, it has been held fairly in tact.

One area of trouble was coming off the main line into the harbor area. Track alignment could not be held to the original plan. Even with 18" radius curves, it would not work as first planned.

I had planned to simply keep the track curling around to the cannery. It would not work. I had to resort to a switchback from the wharf to get inside the curl to service the cannery. But that will likely add interest to switching the area.

A few other areas may need to be recipients of more imagineering, like changing the tall buildings in the town from being on a flat surface to being on a road climbing up the hill.

I would say overall, the theme, the motif, "the vision" has survived. Simply, the path and the details to get there have become more clear.


Thanks for asking.

Dave


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 12/22/2018 8:02:21 PM

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mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 12/23/2018 :  02:26:08 AM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi David.

So sorry to have missed your thread! And for three years! Inexcusable!

I have now just spent an enjoyable two or so hours on a Sunday afternoon (yes - its tomorrow in New Zealand) catching up on all I have missed!

I have never been to Buffalo, but one of my favourite books I ever found in the library was 'where the rails meet the sea'. I remember a very early photograph in that book depicting a scene exactly as you described in your thread. It was one of those photos I remember thinking you could make a whole layout based on that one scene.

I see we have a lot of modelling philosophies in common, along with many shared influences. I enjoyed reading about the many aspects of your modelling journey so far.

With regards to your hilly township. One of the things I always do which I find helps when mocking up scenes, is to cut packing strips of polystyrene (if you can find them - about 3" square and four foot long) into wedges, and then cut these into pieces about 2" long. In this way I can construct movable roads at grade and negotiate curves (rather like the woodland scenics system, but free - and not quite as accurate). I then build up the building sites around these roads with flat layers of polystyrene (keep your eyes on my Tellynott thread - I'll be posting some pictures of this soon). I can then easily make slight changes in height between every structure. Another thing to consider is kit-bashing structures to really fit the site available - like you did with your slightly wedged shaped background building. Leaving strategic alleyways between structures is also very effective - it gives glimpses through to the structures behind, as well as giving the opportunity of fantastic mini scenes in between the structures (the F&SM has many examples of this). One of the best things you can do is take a walk around an old port town on a steep hill (with camera in hand). Its a great adventure and you get to find all sorts of sneaky little cut-throughs, and observe the many retaining walls and other little tricks used to negotiate the sloping ground in the real world. Photocopying kit walls so that you can cut and paste and mingle at will - without ruining your expensive kits is a fantastic way to help you to think outside the box. I probably spend at least 10% of my time on any build playing with mock-ups. So for a big detailed kit that takes me 200 hours to build, I probably spent a minimum of 20 hours 'playing' before I started on any actual modelling. Fortunately I love this part of the hobby, and a cardboard mock-up can spend years in position - looking quite spectacular - before the real model is even started. The backs of structures add some nice interest too. You have scope on the downwards side of the road as you near the backdrop to play with this idea. In this way you can also create some lovely tiers of rooftop heights. Don't be scared to put different roofs on all those flat topped structures. When you look down on them you generally find that not that many are actually flat, its just that from the street their parapet walls hide the roof design. They are often gable or hip roofs with butnyol gutters around the edges, sloping down to scuppers and down-pipes. And don't forget negative and positive detail. This 'texture' adds a great deal of interest, and can help give a very narrow structure the illusion of far greater depth. Ken Hamilton did some great negative and positive detail work with his DPM M T Arms hotel kit-bash.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=24466

Gregg W. also did some great work changing kits up at grade and it is well worth checking out his (and Jim Lucas') work. Below is a link to one of my favourites - it also has links to several other of his threads.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20915

I'll be following along from now on!

Cheers, Mark.



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