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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/01/2018 :  7:57:50 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
The mold making material is fairly straight forward. First clean up whatever casting you intend to duplicate. I used a product called "Amazing Remelt" from Alumilite. The advantage is it can be remelted and reused a multitude of times, but will only produce a few pieces before the mold is useless, as it does not produce high detail like a silicone material.

https://www.alumilite.com/

"How to: videos at https://www.alumilite.com/store/pg/21-How-To-Videos-Alumilite-Mold-Making-Casting-Materials.aspx#prettyPhoto


Find a small container that you won't mind throwing out if you destroy it later. Make sure it is taller than the intended object, as you obbiously need to pour over the top of the object.

Spray both the container and object LIGHTLY with a mold release compound. Cooking spray will work, but it tends to spray out with too much volume and leaves puddles.

Wipe the bottom of the object with a little Vaseline so the compound doesn't seep under it. It also helps it stick to the container and remain upright while you pour the goop in.

The mold compound can be heated right in its container. It took a little over threee minutes in the family microwave.

Overheating produces bubbles that you'll wish you didn't have later. And simply takes longer to cool off.

Pour it over the object in the container.

Here's the important part.

Grab some popcorn, throw that in the same microwave to prove even though you are crazy, you aren't stupid, by heating up stuff that would poison everyone in the family microwave.

(If you do die from it, have a list of your stuff ready for your family to post here, so we can buy it dirt cheap. Remember you told her "I swear that brass locomotive only cost ten bucks" We'll buy it for five, list it on eBay and make a killing.)

I have put the pour into the freezer to cool faster. If you attempt to pop it out too soon and you will lose detail, as the goop hasn't set yet in the middle of the mold.

You'll need to pull the pour with the embedded object out. (Remember the part about using a container you don't might destroying? Getting the stuff out of the container is why I said that. I have used medicine bottles, plastic storage trays. Paper cups that you can tear open work great for small stuff. They work well being waxed ,do the goop does not penetrate.

Stay away from paper boxes. It's a mess afterward when the goop penetrates into the paper. The kids will learn new uses for colorful phrases that they just heard from you. They learn enough at school already and there is no point in encouraging them to learn more.

With the pour and the object both released mix up some hydrocal or plaster, and fill the mold. A little soupy is better so it will help eliminate air bubbles by flowing better. The mold dies not necessarily need to be back in the original container. Evan an old pie plate or cookie sheet works well enough if you get sloppy with the plaster mix.

Yes you'll be impatient to pop that sucker out of there, but give it time. If you have wash the mold afterward, DONT USE HOT WATER,or you will destroy the detail of the mold. Expect maybe two three uses of the mold before it can't hold the detail anymore. I think part of that is because adding water to plaster powder is a thermal reaction, and heat destroys the detail by melting the goop.

That's why a two part silicone mold is better for continual use, but is only good for one specific mold. This goop can be remelted and reused any number of times because I am too cheap to buy more than one of something.

My wife will confirm that, among other things she calls me, I am cheap.

Dave Buchholz
Rochester,NY.



Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/18/2018 6:34:10 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/04/2018 :  12:21:45 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
I have been looking for pictures of how the marine leg grain elevators emptied at the top of the silos. Can't tell you how many pictures I looked at to find some clues.

I did see some triangular shaped "receivers" on top,of the silos, but they were all from ground level,so not much clarity. It finally downed on me how to get the ariel views I wanted.

I simply went on Google maps to the Buffalo harbor. By using the 3D function I could twirl around the top of the silos to see the receiver chutes ran downward into the work house on top the silos. There is a girder system holding up the receivers, and a guard rail to keep people from falling off.

Nice!


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/04/2018 12:23:32 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/04/2018 :  12:40:36 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
By the way, the Windows for the Walthers ADM silos REALLY SUCK. Injected clear plastic, mullions and all. Not worth even trying to paint. Ordered some TICHY windows that will work. Just need to enlarge 32 opening.

No problem. A few beers, sharp Xacto blades and bandaids. What could possible go wrong?


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/04/2018 3:11:30 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/05/2018 :  9:40:07 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
The Marine Leg Build.

If you've been keeping up with things, I've been "Researching" info on "Marine Legs" the term described the tower used to unload ships full of grain up into the silos on the waterfront of places like Buffalo and Montreal.

This first photo is essentially the basic parts that will become the Marine leg in the harbor of the North Coast Railroad. Not much to look at, just a bunch as plastic shapes, trucks and Campbell corrugated siding.


I found two sets of HOn3 trucks in one of my parts bins. Might have been from Central Valley, but no box to verify. Here, I am starting to box in the wheel sets, using Evergreen H channel. The trucks needed a little shaving the "nut" details and slightly sanding the bolsters, as the H channel has a slight angle internally, and the H channels needed to be perpendicular, not twisted.





The boxing in continues. The track spacing was pretty much determined by the H girder between the truck sets, and not a pre-planned distance. In other words, i just winged it when I got there.




This gives a general comparison of the tower base to the silo structure.





The front and back of the tower are being constructed differently. The rear is fairly simple, just a plastic sheet glued to the corner uprights Since it will not be seen, detailing the back is not on my agenda. Likely to be limited to corrugated siding wrapped around the back corners, no windows needed, as the only thing to look at would be the walls of the silos. No one in 1:1 scale will see it, and those in 1:87 are too busy unloading grain to care about what the 1:1 people think about it anyway.




With the tower walls simply clamped in place, see can see it will be of a height that is even higher than the silo, as marine legs use gravity to slide the grain down into the Head house, usually not directly into the silos themselves.





As always , your comments and constructive critcism are always welcome.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/18/2018 7:16:14 PM

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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/05/2018 :  11:25:17 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Here's a few drawings depicting the flow of materials in a grain elevator. (Used with permission: Bflo hist soc.)

First is the grain ship with incoming grain, unloaded via the Marine Leg.





Second is the rail car side of things, which can include both incoming and outgoing loads.




Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/06/2018 :  06:25:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very interesting subject matter, and I like what I see on the bench. Carry on David!


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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2018 :  08:24:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Very interesting project. I love all the mechanical stuff on those grain silos. It be neat to animate one, but probably take forever to do and be quite complicated.

Those trucks are Central Valley. I can tell by the insulated side of the wheels. It's that distinctive blue and red they used.

I'll need to check in more to follow your build. Nice work.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2672 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 04/06/2018 :  09:36:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, your marine leg looks impressive already.
I thought I would share with you a similar device found on Graham MacDonald's layout.
It's not on a rail system like yours moves on, but other than that it's the same sort of thing.
He also left the one side off, so you can see the inner workings of his marine leg.









Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7775 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/06/2018 :  10:34:16 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Greg, is the boat an extended version of the Langell Boys, or a scratchbuild or what?

Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 04/06/2018 :  10:44:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz

Greg, is the boat an extended version of the Langell Boys, or a scratchbuild or what?



Dave, it is another kit from "Sylvan" the HO-1050 260' foot Great Lakes Freighter.
You can also purchase an additional mid section to make this freighter even longer.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7775 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/08/2018 :  06:39:18 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
More pics to come of the tower and marine leg. I was digging through my box of windows and doors to see what I could come with versus having to buy new parts. Found some that will do. Honestly, I don't have a plan drawn out for this thing. The parts and pieces I find are dictating things.

Things that drive the outcome. No sense planning on eight windows when I only have seven to work with. The Campbell's Corrugated siding comes in several sizes. I have 8 ft and 10 ft packages, so that determined the distance between floors. The prior drawings that I posted are guiding my general plan.

More pics to come over the next few days.


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/08/2018 :  09:08:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
David,

This gets more interesting all the time.

Makes sense to me to scale things out to the materials you have on hand, especially if it makes for a neater job.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4130 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/08/2018 :  7:58:11 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Here's a few more update pics from work earlier today. As mentioned prior, I really don't have a blue print, and am just making it up as I go along, based on what I have laying around to work with. I am using the drawing posted above as a general plan. But since this is not going into competition, if it can't be seen, like the back of the tower,I don't add any unseen detail.

A little better view of the tower components




The back and sides are attached. The front won't go on for a while as I engineer the interior with some detail components, but ran out of scale I beams for the floor supports.

I'm working on how the marine leg will be constructed but need some more planning and measuring.





Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/18/2018 7:26:45 PM

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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/09/2018 :  10:48:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
David this is a great project. I haven't seen one of these things before. Florida has it's phosphate loading facilities but what you're building is a whole other ballgame.





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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 04/09/2018 :  7:38:41 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
So are you saying building the tower is off the modeling deep end? Or just if it falls over into the water?



Home of the North Coast Railroad.

Edited by - David J Buchholz on 04/10/2018 4:43:05 PM

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