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Author Previous Topic: DPM Corner Apothecary - (another) Kitbash Topic Next Topic: NNY RR
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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/31/2017 :  11:04:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm going to use an approach that has been talked about on Model Railroad Hobbyist e-zine. It's called "TOMA" (The "One Module" Approach, emphasis on One Module). It basically boils down to building a section of the layout from benchwork to finished module. I plan to use this approach to build several modules that can be taken to local shows.

So the first module to be built will be the Western Logging Co. only it won't be called Western Logging.



The past week I've been learning a 3D program, DesignSpark Mechanical 2.0. I figured it'd be a good tool to learn to eventually use to design TT scale rolling stock and rolling stock power. I'm looking to the future of setting up a table top plastic injection molding machine for limited runs. Time will tell if this comes to fruition.

Here's my first attempt at a 3D design of the first module. Still needs some refinements.



For those of you that are interested in the dimensions. The module is 55" over all length by 12" wide. The two cross members with the holes are 10.5" wide by 5 3/4" tall by 1/2" thick. I will use clear 1/2" thick pine for construction. A piece of 1/2" thick plywood will be fitted into the frame covered by a piece of 1/2" Homasote 12" by 55". This will cover the plywood. I'm using 1/2" quarter round stock on either side of the cross members for support. Still to be added are strips around the inside perimeter to hold the plywood. I'll post again when the 3D drawing is done.

Bernd



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/31/2017 :  3:00:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neat project Bernd.

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12305 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2017 :  5:35:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Have been working with the 3D program and completed the drawing for the first module.

This is what it will look like with all the major parts, except for the plywood & Homasote top. All made from 1/2" clear pine board.



Basic dimensions of the Module #1



The orange colored part is the 1/2" thick plywood that will fit in flush with the top of the side/end boards. The gray part is the 1/2" thick Homasote the will fit flush with sides of the frame.



The plywood and Homasote assembled with the frame and some basic dimensions.



Picked up the lumber today. The next several days or weeks I'll build up the module.

Until then,
Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/02/2017 :  7:05:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a great read Bernd! Plenty of information! Have you ever cut/milled and PCB stock to make ties?

Philip



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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2017 :  08:24:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice work Bernd.

Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

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Dutchman
Administrator

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Posted - 02/03/2017 :  08:46:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It is good to see activity again here, Bernd.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

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quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2017 :  12:50:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just went through the entire thread again Bernd'. It's amazing how time fly's. It's also amazing the work you do and in such a tiny scale. All the pics look fine along with the how to's....


Ted in South Western, Connecticut

Country: USA | Posts: 4375 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  12:57:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bruce & Ted, thanks.

I've decided to for go the Challenge this time around and spend some time on finally getting some TT scale stuff built. I want to get it to the point of being able to take it to a show come this December. I think TT scale has a place in todays modeling. At this point it's still pretty much a scratchbuilders scale with a good set of magnifiers. It is a bit bigger than N but you still need some magnification to work on it, but it's not that small to get some good detail worked into.

Stay tuned more to come in the next several weeks (I hope).

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  1:03:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

I'm a day late and a dollar short with posting on experimenting with some track work I promised Tuesday.

The discussion centered around spikes small enough for use in TT to spike Code55 rail to ties. I proposed using pins with cut off heads. A question on Rail Line Forum brought forth the use of phosphor-bronze wire. So I experimented with the wire. Results show .020" dia. wire works good. The use of pins will also work but they are a bit larger in dia.


I use the pins to temporarily hold the track down when using glue, such as Pliobond, until the glue dries. The PB (phosphor bronze) wire I discovered when making spikes is that the head breaks when squeezing the wire flat first and them bending the flat part 90. I had the same problem with the pins. I then bend the wire first and then flatten it to form the spike head. Worked much better on both the pins and the PB wire.



I laid two strips of resin ties on either side of the Clover House wooden ties for an experiment of spiking.



I spiked one tie with a pin and the second tie with PB wire. Note that the tie with the pin split. This can be solved by using a drill first for a pilot hole. The tie spiked with the PB wire didn't split. After forming the head of the spike I used a pair of side cutters at an angle to cut the formed spike. No hole drilling is necessary with the PB wire.



Here are the tools I used. From left to right, Xurcon sprue side cutters, a pair of flat nosed pliers from Michaels in their bead department, needle nose pliers, a second pair of needle nose pliers and the .020" dia. phosphor bronze wire.



The needle nosed pliers have two grooves ground into the jaws at a 90. This helps hold the spike and keep it from twisting while pushing in the spike.



A pair of Xurcon spruce side cutters.



The flat pliers from Michaels from their beading department.



First I make a 90 bend in the wire.





Next I squeeze the wire as close to the pivot as possible because of leverage.





The rough head of the spike.



I trim the end of to shorten it.



Then I cut the spike off at a severe side angle to give it a sharp point.





The spike is placed into the pliers with the two notches.



Hold tightly and push the spike into the wood tie.



And the end result. Also note the two spikes 5 ties further up the picture.



My conclusion is that it's possible to form spikes from .020" phosphor bronze wire. The wire is stiff enough to use in this way. This may seem like a lot of work to spike rail to wooden ties, but I believe the end result is quite good looking. If you are into building a highly detailed layout then this is the way to go. If you are building a layout to operate as soon as possible then this could be a deterrent. But we have to start some where.

As always comments and suggestions are welcome.

Bernd




Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  1:07:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

Given a sturdy enough lever-action vise, it might be possible to make a jig: Two holes, one deep enough to make a head, the other large enough for the head and the depth of the whole spike. Then form the head with a hammer blow.



I was thinking two halves of a steel block with a V groove's milled to 3/16" length or whatever length spike you want. The groove would be about .010" to .015" deep for a .020" dia. wire. Bend over the ends sticking out and then "whack" with a hammer.

Now that I have the air spindle finally mounted on the mill I may just give it a try.

Mill with air spindle attachment.



The cutters.



Bernd




Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  1:16:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Philip

This is a great read Bernd! Plenty of information! Have you ever cut/milled and PCB stock to make ties?

Philip



Philip,

I explained on this page how I do track work with PCB's: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46165&whichpage=6

Scroll down about half way you'll come upon a jig I made for track building.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  1:18:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Very nice work Bernd.



Thanks Jerry. More to come.

Bernd



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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2017 :  4:20:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bernd

quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Very nice work Bernd.



Thanks Jerry. More to come.

Bernd



I'll add to that you must have the patience of a saint...


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9264 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2017 :  7:52:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941


I'll add to that you must have the patience of a saint...



Thanks Jerry. Certain things I have large amounts of patience, others I don't.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/04/2017 :  04:35:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd, wonderful looking module. I really like like your 3D drawings. Nice track plan, and like a switching puzzle.
You sure do have some cool looking equipment and tools.



Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, it's still popular.

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