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Author Previous Topic: Justice City Diorama Topic Next Topic: Loco shed, scratchbuild
Page: of 17

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/06/2017 :  10:47:19 AM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys!




Bought these items; a few days ago I fired up a soldering iron I purchased years ago only to discover that the solder just dropped right off of the pencil point nib . . . cannot ‘tin’ the wires unless the solder stays on the end. Greg had an iron with a flat edge where the solder could puddle; then you swiftly dipped in-and-out, your wire tip end (1/4 inch or so), and that was how you ‘tinned’ it!

So I purchased this new iron (more expensive). The clamp I purchased to steady the iron at a slight angle . . .



exactly like you see it in the picture above, on my work bench. Greg had a set up something like this as well.


I discovered that when you cut a piece of the tubing that will be turned into a goose neck lamp, you end up pinching one end. I tried Greg’s method of slicing it with a razor blade while turning it round. I still pinched the end shut. However I was able to un-pinch it with a pair of tiny pliers, then ream it with a pin tip!

Tinned and fished the red and green wires through the goose neck hollow tube, just like Greg showed me!
I never thought I would be doing something like this . . . adding lighting to a model. Then again, I never thought I would be building (from scratch) a model of the Palmerston Coal dock, either!





For this shed, I needed a goose neck that was considerably shorter (given that I don’t have a lot of room above the door), so I was able to custom cut a goose neck that would take that into account.
Now comes soldering the light to the end of those tiny wires!


Ventured forth and did one light . . . but it would not light up! What did I do wrong?
I think I hadn’t tinned the green wire properly, or I may have placed it improperly . . .

BACK STORY: I did all my soldering; it went off without a hitch, well, the tinning was trickier than I remember it being at Greg’s; I even did the LED to wire connection flawlessly! However, when I hooked up the battery the LED did not light up! I thought it might be poor tinning, so I fiddled with different wires . . . laying them along side of the solders . . . but nothing. It had crossed my mind that I may have ‘crossed’ the wires incorrectly that is placed the red wire where the green one should be and when I acted upon that hunch by reversing the connection, Red wire to Black connector on the Battery and Green wire to the Red/Positive, connector on the Battery . . . we had ‘light’!




The graphic below shows how the wires should be connected! (of course I had done this wrong)


Sand House Goose Neck Light:


This one was done correctly!


The interior of the Sand House will be lit . . . but I don’t think I will do the interior of the entrance into the Coal Dock Mechanism.




That's all for now.


Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 09/06/2017 :  1:05:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Rob, nice to see you putting your new skills to work.
When you have a new soldering iron you must tin the tip of it so it holds onto solder.
I have brushed on soldering paste to a cold new tip, then heated it up until hot enough to melt the solder onto the tip.
The soldering paste will help in holding the solder onto the tip, tinning the new tip.
Also if you accidently solder the wires backward you can still use them that way.
You just need to remember that your red wire is the negative, and your green wire is now the positive.
Sometimes it's better to go with that mistake than re-soldering the LED all over again.
Your new lights look great!
Though that one on the small shed looks kind of funny coming out of the roof.
Looks like you have enough room just above the door to fit it in that spot instead of where you have placed it now.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7957 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/08/2017 :  1:07:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Greg!

Good to know about tinning the iron to get the solder to pool on it. I guess the new one I bought already had that done to it because it worked right out of the package!

About those wires . . ., right you are about it still working, and not to bother trying to re-wire and re-solder . . . I'm worried about frying that LED so I won't go there. Feel like I dodged a bullet not having to do that

As for the shed's light; that shed is tucked under the Coal Bin, so the odd placement of the lamp won't be evident . . . however, nothing is nailed down yet, so I can still do something about it.





Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

ed k
Fireman

Posted - 09/08/2017 :  1:10:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Live and learn, we all do it. Some better than others.
Nice job.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/08/2017 :  8:23:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Robert, it's always nice when you can recover from a mistake. Those are fine looking goose neck lights.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14797 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/09/2017 :  9:51:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ed, George, thanks guys, appreciate that!

Greg, I made the changes you suggested . . . and I think you were right!

Thanks





Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 09/09/2017 :  10:04:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rob, now I will be able to sleep tonight.
Thank you!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7957 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/07/2017 :  2:51:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote


I've got to work on the 'catwalk' and staircase for the Coal Bin. Should have started with the catwalk first but I was intrigued by the staircase so I thought I'd give it a go.

By the way, what I am showing you here is a method I came up with to build a staircase from scratch . . . but the end result wasn't exactly to my liking. Still, with a bit more care, the second try will be much better.

At the time of this writing I have as yet to built the second 'go-at-it' but will show you the process by which I built my first attempt regardless of that fact. When I build it again, I will use the same method, just with a lot more care!



The drawing of the steps was printed off twice in the HO scale, and then glued down to card stock. Then I cut out the step profile with an X-Acto blade. Above we have the left and right side upon which each step, will be glued.



Then I cut out the step 'Stringer'. In the picture above we have the two parts that need to be glued together.



Once glued together I flipped it over with the stringer side up, and cut off the excess card stock.

With the results seen below.



I made a ‘jig/template’ to alighn some of the parts of the staircase.




A quick eyeball check . . .



A little comparison with the prototype . . .




The steps or ‘Run’, of the steps . . . 16 of them, at 33 HO inches (2.3) in length.

Well, I tried this and found the staircase to look very narrow . . . so I snipped off the two test pieces (which I found to be a big mistake), and tried a couple of test pieces (unglued), one was 36 HO inches (3.0) and the next was 39 HO inches(3.1). I went with the 39.



A little rickety looking at the very top . . . thanks to the glue that would not come off when I made that adjustment (snip-off).



Next, the 'Catwalk' . . .


Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Edited by - Artman on 10/08/2017 08:30:16 AM

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/07/2017 :  3:05:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote

Some months ago I pulled a bunch of brass staples out of a box. The staples where of course bent, so taking a pair of pliers I un-bent them, and set them aside.

The idea was that perhaps I might find a use for them in my model making ventures.
Sure enough, today I put those brass stapes to good use.



In the picture above, I decided to use this brass as the ‘cat-walk’ support braces in the floor boards. The problem I was facing is that this light balsa wood is much too easily damaged by the least bit of handling. The fragility of constructions done at a certain size using this material makes it damned near impossible to keep it together. So when I thought about how I might strengthen the smallest of the constructions, I thought of either using plastic or brass. Then it was that I found the perfect use for those brass staples. Adds strength to the floor of my cat-walk and serves as a mount to the side of the coal bin. Perfect!




More later . . . I have a party to attend to right now!


Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/07/2017 :  5:39:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Robert,

I think the party is right here!

This is showing very, very well.

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6275 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/08/2017 :  08:51:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Pete, glad your enjoying this little build of mine.



Okay, so more . . .


It looks a little out of alignment . . . I think there was some shrinkage here. The floor boards had just been stained and then marked with a sharpie centered where each beam would be. After I glued this all down (the final one some several hours later) I found the alignment off a tad. It looks worse in the picture than it is upon the actual model, so I won't be rebuild it.

In the photo above the cat-walk extends out further than in the drawing. That is because I decided to lengthen the steps from 33 inches to 40 inches. The reason for this was simply aesthetic; the damned thing looked too narrow at 33 inches.
Now comes the railing . . . oh boy!

The jig . . .



The results!






This entire assembly went together near perfectly! The details matching the Prototype are close . . . and I’m particularly pleased with the sturdiness of it, and how splitting the board after it was glued to the copper/brass, staples was a stroke of genius. I could never have attained this level of fit & finish, had I pre-cut those boards and then fiddled them into place!

I only wish those stairs had turned out so well . . . I’ll be doing them over again!


Alright, I've got to run again (off to church). . . more later.


Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Edited by - Artman on 10/08/2017 9:06:11 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 10/08/2017 :  11:26:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rob, I'd say you nailed it, but that would not be correct, so instead I will say you flatten out stapled it!
Nice work with your set of stairs as well.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7957 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 10/08/2017 :  4:48:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, the cat walk looks nice. Also nice to see how you used jigs for precision work.

Bernd


kingstonemodelworks.com

Country: USA | Posts: 2981 Go to Top of Page

Artman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 10/08/2017 :  9:04:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Artman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Chuckle . . . that's a good one, Greg.

And thanks Bernd!

Alright so 'more'. . .
Well, I decided to 'Dolly up' the look of those stapes, lol . . . after all their not prototypical


Strip Styrene
Evergreen Scale Models I-Beam .080" (2.0mm)





I will paint them later . . . haven't decided if I'll use oil paints or acrylic (I'll do a little experimenting because I'm not sure how the plastic will handle oil paint or the acrylic). I will also be painting some brass parts (more experimenting).

Speaking of which . . . I'm going to do the following parts in brass . . .





These are my drawings of the chute bracket and coal stop valve parts and the pulleys in HO Scale. I'm making them out of brass, not wood.

Lets see how it goes . . .

Cut out some Brass foil 1/64"


Using 3M Super77 spray adhesive, upon the back of the paper cut-out, I glued it upon the brass foil.


Taking an X-ACTO knife with a fresh blade, and my HO metal ruler, I gingerly cut out the drawing glued to the brass.


Here I lined up the entire assembly with the coal chute (previously designed in Solid Works and 3D printed).

Of course I made a mistake with what I call the 'Coal Chute Valve' . . . and had to adjust the drawing (Valve needed more depth), so I printed, glued and cut out a new set. I then stripped off the paper . . . seen below.

sweetness and light! Now that is much better!




Alright, so now I'm on a 'Brass-craze'
I'm going in to see if I can make some even smaller parts . . .

But first,

The two metal plates . . . you guessed it, made of brass, were measured and cut to fit. Then I placed it as seen above, between two insert beams.

I also test fit the metal plates that rivet and bolster the beam joints where vertical legs and horizontal floor supports meet.This had already been done some time ago and shown in an earlier post.



These are the pulley housings.



Cut them out and then sliced 'dowel styrene' to serve as the pulley wheels. Glued them in place with extra thick Cyanoacrylate/crazy glue.








Those pulleys are attached to L shaped metal track which I chose to make out of Strip Styrene.



It was to wide . . . .080" and I needed the .060" but did not have any. So as can be seen in the image above, I trimmed it.

Then I glued the entire assemblage together.




Tiny little buggers but they are still a tad more robust than the prototype . . .





In this case, I'm calling it "good enough"!

That's it for now.



Robert Wanka
http://www.robertwanka.com

Edited by - Artman on 10/08/2017 9:13:43 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/08/2017 :  9:29:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nicely done. That green glow in the western sky is not an Aurora, it's envy! This is gorgeous!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6275 Go to Top of Page
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