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Author Previous Topic: Laying tracks on a wharf / dock Topic Next Topic: Paint...again.
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miekec
New Hire

Posted - 01/24/2016 :  8:22:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More progress in the last months. All three have been built, at least the basics. Windows, porches, railings, stairs. They have a spot on the layout too. I am somewhat between builds at the moment; the big hydrocal station I've been working on is waiting for us to build the platform sheds. So, I picked up this corner of the layout to move it forward. Yesterday and today was a lot of hyperfocused work - my right shoulder is sore. Pictures later this week. Foundations, windows glazed, bunch of curtains, roof work, some weathering, and almost ready for installing the lattice under the porches. Starting to think about laundry lines and back yards.


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Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/24/2016 :  9:58:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All progress, however slight, is good. That said, sore shoulders are Not Good. This is supposed to be fun! Be well!

Looking forward to seeing how this develops. "Laundry lines and backyards" will be a treat. Don't overlook the <ahem> stuff <cough> on the porches!

Pete
in Michigan



Edited by - Orionvp17 on 01/24/2016 9:59:32 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7229 Go to Top of Page

Jeff G
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/25/2016 :  06:38:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Really nice work on this structure, and it's always nice to have a little help from your friends.. The kit is based on a Model Railroader construction article by Earl Smallshaw from the March or April 1989 issue. It's very comprehensive, vis a vis all the detailing (laundry lines and even HO scale laundry) that brings the structure to life. Shoot me a PM and I'll be happy to scan and e-mail it to you if you'd like a copy.


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miekec
New Hire

Posted - 01/25/2016 :  07:42:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pete, Jeff, thanks. They are fun to build. James has the magazine too (and probably several years around it). Maybe I should read it :)
Living in the area that is being modeled does give new a relatively good idea of what things are supposed to look like, albeit decades before I moved here.



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miekec
New Hire

Posted - 01/25/2016 :  07:42:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pete, Jeff, thanks. They are fun to build. James has the magazine too (and probably several years around it). Maybe I should read it :)
Living in the area that is being modeled does give new a relatively good idea of what things are supposed to look like, albeit decades before I moved here.



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miekec
New Hire

Posted - 01/25/2016 :  2:23:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Part 1 of pictures from the past few days:

Rummaging through the pile of parts to find the right ones:



Preparing curtains: Paint part of a paper tissue with various colors. Some thinned down for a more see-through effect, some regular strength paint. In order for the curtains to hang straight, I used only the straight edge side.



Reinforced the inside, to more solidly glue the piece of masonite for the foundation. The building itself only had the thin walls, and I wanted a bit more surface. I used remnants of the sheets the building parts were lasercut from. Plenty of nice straight pieces of wood.



In order to attach the chimney, rather than try to cut a hole in the middle of the roof, I just cut 2 slits in the back side of it. Easy access. Left the cut piece attached, for a smooth transition and more attached surface.







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miekec
New Hire

Posted - 01/25/2016 :  9:11:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The other roof needed some more stuff, so I put the side of a stairwell exit on. Clapboard, like the rest of the building. I thought it would be smart to put it all the way in the back, so it would rest against the backdrop. After I had knocked it off (and re-attached) several times, I put some bracing behind it, to make it sturdier. Of course, after all that it turns out that I had made it way too small and have to redo it. Live and learn.



All the doors got knobs



And curtains were hung







And an attempt at a flower in a window.



The area under the porches got test-fitted for lattice finishing:



Which after cutting, painting and glueing looked better:





Some pictures of where they are on the layout, and what area I get to stick scenery onto. I was disappointed that the majority of the lattice work I spent so much time on is hardly visible when the house is in position. The gray/blue house will have more visible lattice in the front, and probably the brown/orange one too.
Also, the black on the background will be painted blue again, now that we've re-positioned the tenements in a more permanent location.





The space on the left, where the red cab truck is, is the back of a yet-to-be-decided loading dock (generic cardboard mockup there now). With road access disappearing into the background. 3 back yards by the houses, then another alley between the white house and the business on its right (forget its name, it is an already-built structure).
All of this is sitting on a piece of foam that can come out to work on. Part of me wants to attach the tenements to the foam, to protect stairs and a laundry-line between two of the buildings. Then again, being able to remove them has its own benefits. Stay tuned!




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Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/25/2016 :  9:17:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about telephone poles (or similar) with the laundry lines hanging out over the yard?

Fences to keep the kids in the yard and off the tracks, lots of weeds and shrubbery on the track side of the fences-- you can go to town on this little area! Gardens, dog houses, kids, gossip, it's all good!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7229 Go to Top of Page

miekec
New Hire

Posted - 09/02/2016 :  9:47:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Summer is keeping us busy outside, so not much got done on the railroad. Some progress - a start on the scenery around the tenements. I marked off garden spaces (which is what thiose little metal t-bars are for, marking the property lines) and did paths and some grass (with help from jbvb).
Now, I'm painting fences. Ideally, I want wooden fences made of wood, because, you know, it'll look more like wood. For now, the easy of having it at hand has me painting plastic fences.





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