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 New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2015 :  11:30:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your usual precise explanation on how to do things. Excellent text.

Love that coloring Kris. You know how I love those reds. And yours is right on. Great weathering effects.



Country: USA | Posts: 9441 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 04/15/2015 :  11:49:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice.


Country: USA | Posts: 3067 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/20/2015 :  6:36:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry for the delay, but got hung-up with the NASCAR race rain delay yesterday and didn't get my chores here accomplished... even though I was only watching the race on TV.

I'm just going to describe the updates via a picture description followed by the picture so you can follow along. As always, comments to the good, bad and ugly are welcome.

Below you can see what can be accomplished by hand carving the balsa foam. The picture shows the wall with the thin header carved over the right door. Notice that this wall also has a stone pillar carved over the seam where the pieces of foam were joined to obtain the necessary length of the wall. Two coats of Gesso have also been applied.



This picture will assist you in getting a real feel for hand carving of the foam. That is a scale HO 4x4 next to the narrow header carved in the foam. Also notice the thin foam at the top of the opening... again hand carved.



Tools used to date in the carving of the foam. I've also included the Foredom Motor Tool which I wanted to also try on the foam. I've carved in a few header spaces to fit scale 4x4 wood strips into place above the door and window openings. My next exercise was to see how a power tool may work with the foam. Note that I have a foot controlled pedal to manage the speed of my Foredom. I used very slow speeds only with the power tool.



This is a close-up of header spaces carved out using the Foredom. The carved area is designed to seat a 4x4 header which will be made from scale strip wood.



This is the header over the right door in the wall in place. The scale 4x4 is above the left door. I used a dental tool to scrape a 90 degree edge into the foam once the opening was carved with the Foredom.



A close-up of the right door with the header sitting in the carved area using the Foredom.



The next step was to paint the backs of the openings with a very dark color to represent the inside of a building and not have the yellow foam or white Gesso showing. I chose to use Delta Ceramcoat "Charcoal" as I have better luck with a black which is not totally black. The paint in the picture is wet, but it dries to a flat matte finish and is not reflective. I have also painted the areas on the wall which will have wood sliding doors hanging.



The next picture shows one of my failures. This is the first attempt of painting the stones in the wall. As can be seen, the wall did not come close to the first wall in coloring. I followed the same coloring sequence as on the first wall, but used a final wash of light A-I instead of Silverwood.



A close-up of the large concrete header over the large door opening. This is just a untouched surface left in the carved foam. The foam has a wonderful texture for concrete in HO and O scales. You can see how I ruined the texture effect on the left side of the header by sticking my thumb on it while the A-I wash was still very wet. The coloring was done using Delta Ceramcoate Sandstone #02402, Mudstone #02488 and FolkArt Camel #953.



This shows the second attempt at coloring the stones. I just repainted the stones using the same sequence, but adding in a bit stronger hues when picking out individual stones. I did not go over the wall with a Silverwood wash as a final step as I'm still waiting for the stuff to dry a bit further.



I highlighted the concrete header over the large door with a drybrush of Ceramcoat Soft Grey, # 02515. This is a close-up showing the header. It actually looks better in real-time.



I had a bit of sunshine on my work area and took a quick picture of the red siding. This shows the red siding in both shadow and sunlight to help give a better feel of the coloring achieved earlier with the strip wood.




-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/20/2015 :  7:01:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is looking so good Kevin.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

Country: USA | Posts: 4352 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/21/2015 :  7:54:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks everyone for looking-in and the kind comment Bob.

Learned something new when working with the foam tonight.

While placing the 4x4 headers for the doors and windows I found that the wood did not look correct, not enough mass. I decided to make the headers over the doors using HO scale 6x6's.

While cramming in the 6x6's I found that the foam did not 'give' and now has a touch of memory. I thus was not able to place the headers exactly as I wanted.

I'm not sure if the issue is the Gesso, acrylic paints or a combo of the two, but what I've learned is that when fitting components into the foam, make sure to 'finish' fit, not rough fit the area where the component is to be placed if finishing the foam surface with Gesso or paint prior to installing the component.

Note that this may not be an issue if the foam is colored with pastels and some solvent like Acetone or ETOH is used. I have not tested this yet, but it is something to keep in mind.

I have brush painted the 6x6 strip wood with Americana White Wash (DA02) with very small amounts of Delta Ceramcoat Mudstone and Ceramcoat Sandstone. The latter two were just blended into the brush at various amounts to create a final finish on the wood which was not totally uniform in color across all headers. This will be done for all window and door frames.

Below is the overall wall with the two 6x6 headers in place over the two doors. The second picture is a close-up. The small defect in the wood over the right door on the left bottom corner is not visible in actual viewing, and is actually smaller than a straight pin head. Note that the large 'concrete-ish' colored base area will be covered with ground contours on the diorama.

The space above the header actually looks like the stones in the wall are at various depths in the mortar adding additional texture to the wall. The earlier applied dark hue Charcoal paint enhances the effect.





-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/21/2015 8:25:42 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/21/2015 :  11:34:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks great Kris. The sunshine sure did make that color pop. I really like it now.

A little progress on the window area. Nice.



Country: USA | Posts: 9441 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/28/2015 :  7:03:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, a week slipped by without an update. Sorry gang.

Been doing a bit of fine detail 'fiddling' with the balsa foam wall.

I ended up deciding to see if I could fill the small spaces by the door headers and side frames with some lightweight spackling paste. This build is, after all, a test build. Playing with some spackling paste now may further add to my toolbox and ability to hide corner seams later.

Turned out that I was able to fill the holes with some spackling without the loss of much of the 3-D of the surrounding stones. Once the spackling had dried for 12 hours or more, I went back and spot colored the white spackling with a Silverwood wash.

The spackling took the Silverwood wash to produce the the same coloring as the Gesso base. And the neat thing is that the headers and door frames look more 'installed' and set in place than just having the black peeking out through a hole.

Hard to see, but the first picture shows the door areas with the spackling paste added and colored.


Big Hint: Wood and balsa foam love each other, particularly if Tight-Bond II is involved. I was worried a bit about the dust on the foam surface, but it does not appear to be a factor.

I was going to build the doors in place where the door openings are carved, but discovered during the layout process that I didn't carve the opening face flat enough. I had some minor hills and gullies on the back of the opening surface which affected how the boards making up the door laid out.

I decided to take the approach of building the doors using my basic method, but adding a couple of scrap straps across the back side of the door to keep the front surface of the door in the same plane.

Instead of going into detail on door building from scratch here, I'll reference a step-by-step tutorial I did in the following thread. Look for the heading of "Scratch Building a Door" about 3/4ths of the way down the page.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=41286

The following two pictures show the door. The first is the back side showing the scrap wood strips (2x12's or so) to stabilize the door in the carved opening.

The second picture shows the front of the door. There are no outside door handles on any historical picture I've seen for this or similar doors in the mills I've reviewed which were constructed with stone walls. So... no outside handles included.

The second picture also gives a clue on how I weathered the door to enhance the individual 2x6 boards making up the door. Once the door was constructed and all glue had dried, I gave the back side of the door a light wash of Silverwood. The front of the door was placed on a rag to help pull the Silverwood through the seams between the pieces of strip wood. Enough of the Silverwood also remained at the edges of the framing (scale 2x4's) to provide a bit of an accent/shadow effect. You can also see some of my 'sandcastle' fitting of the door frame diagonals which would not be allowed in a regular build.




The final picture shows the door in place (not yet installed) in the wall to get a feel where this wall is going.


As always, thanks for dropping by. Comments and questions are always welcome.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/28/2015 10:42:31 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/29/2015 :  5:43:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And behind Door #2 is....

Second door much like the first door in construction.

The last picture shows how the 6x6 headers slightly extend beyond the face of the wall while the door opening frames are slightly below the wall face.

Next up... A couple of windows.







-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 04/29/2015 :  6:44:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris, doors & newer 6x6 headers look great nestled into their proper openings.
Keep up the great work!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7236 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/29/2015 :  8:18:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris what a difference that wall makes with the doors.
Can't wait to see the window in.

This is really coming together nicely.



Edited by - TRAINS1941 on 04/29/2015 8:22:06 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 9441 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/30/2015 :  11:26:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
VINTAGE CATERPILLAR
Something special for the folks checking in... I normally don't refer folks to off-site links, but this is too hard to resist. This is a real Chuck Doan challenge...

And if you look closely, you can see how some of the 'ore gates' worked....

From the Western Mining History Museum:
https://scontent-dfw.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/16812_748075098596734_6124158541811046769_n.jpg?oh=fe02b0f394764034a7411d1d66ac4827&oe=55D2156D

John Allen Inspiration??
And for those John Allen fans...
https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/544928_720588474678730_1398594744859581807_n.jpg?oh=17b79e2758b5ea9c433f12fd23bfd6c2&oe=55D52358&__gda__=1439447476_573efc51bffb5f202d60d5b35ac1cf4c


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/30/2015 11:51:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/30/2015 :  11:38:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great picture Kris.


Country: USA | Posts: 9441 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 05/01/2015 :  12:34:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Awesome photos! That last one is Bingham City, UT. Everything in that photo is gone now, eaten up as the mine expanded.




Country: USA | Posts: 3067 Go to Top of Page

tommytrains
New Hire

Posted - 05/01/2015 :  9:25:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have been following along on this well done scratch built mill project. Good information on your coloring too. Excellent work !
Tom



Country: USA | Posts: 10 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/02/2015 :  12:53:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Guys for looking in and the comments. Glad to entertain everyone, and with some luck, pass on some modeling information/skills which others can use.

So.. The first windows are basically done.

8-Pane Window:
The window with the 8-panes is a modified Grandt Line casting, Horizontal Window #5251. I chose a horizontal window casting as I felt that there would be less cutting involved to remove the window sill frames around the window.
1) The Window opening was framed with scale 2x6 strip wood which had been grained and painted the off-white hue.
2) The 'Charcoal' color was touched-up as necessary.
3) For glass, I cut to fit and installed a piece of 3M Scotchcal Marking Film #8520 backing. This looks like acetate sprayed with a even layer of Dullcoat, but without the fuss.
4) Using the Grandt Line casting, I trimmed off the cast on sills leaving basically just the framed window.
2) This modified casting was then fitted to the opening with a bit of judicious sanding.
3) Once fitted, the casting was painted and allowed to dry.
4) The casting was then glued into place.

Small Horizontal Window:
I was going to modify a 4-pane Grandt Line casting but after two failed attempts at modifying a casting, abandoned the idea in favor of scratch building the window.
1) The bottom of the window opening was lined with grained and colored 2x12 strip wood, placing the edge of the window ledge just below the surface of the stone wall.
2) The sides of the window opening were lined with scale 2x6's.
3) A top 2x6 was installed.
4) A small piece of 3M Scotchcal Marking Film #8520 backing was installed to simulate glass.
5) A painted scale 1x1 was installed to form the center muntin bar. This was edged and end glued into place and acts to hold the glass in place.
Note: I had intended on adding 1x1 strips at each end of the window but decided during the test fitting that these made the window appear just too small.

The first picture is an overview of the wall prior to the horizontal window center muntin bar installed. The 8-pane modified casting is in place.


The second picture shows the small horizontal window with the scratch built frame. I did not measure for the placement of the center muntin, but just placed it in a single shot due to the volume of glue it had on such a small piece. Pretty happy with the free-hand placement of the piece.


The final picture shows the tools and set-up used to create the sliding door in the middle of the wall. The 2x6 door panels are pressed onto a piece of double sided Scotch Tape which is hard to see. The tape holds the door components in place for gluing. You can see the 2x6 horziontal header and footer pieces along with the black area on the wall directly above the door which will be covered by this door.
NOTE: The large piece of scale 10x or 12x strip wood is used to press the individual pieces of door wood onto the Scotch Tape and hold the pieces in place when the triangle for alignment is removed. The triangle tends to stick to the tape and pull or move the last piece of strip wood added when removed.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 05/02/2015 01:14:24 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7060 Go to Top of Page
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