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Author Previous Topic: Narrowgauge 0-scale ore car Topic Next Topic: Spirit Mansion
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deemery
Fireman

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Posted - 04/07/2015 :  10:46:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's an HO scale table I did, in PDF and Excel formats: http://www.earlyrail.org/ho-scale-table.pdf http://www.earlyrail.org/Ho-scale-table.xls In addition to the scale, decimal and fractional equivalents, I added wire gauge number/drill sizes, something I'm often cross-referencing

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 04/07/2015 10:48:38 AM

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quartergauger48
Fireman

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Posted - 04/07/2015 :  1:54:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, that is an excellent chart you made. That's what I need in O scale...I just don't have the patience
you take the time to make one....



Ted

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2015 :  4:47:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, it's not all that hard to mess with the Excel spreadsheet, which is why I included it. The methodology is to do both the decimal to feet/inch calculations and the feet/inch to decimal calculations. Then sort and remove the duplicates. (In O scale, there will be a lot of duplicates, i.e. .250" is 1' 0" )

If someone does this in another scale, let me know and I'll post it on earlyrail.org

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 04/07/2015 4:50:53 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6402 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2015 :  7:07:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ted, is something like this what you need. You will need to scroll down the second table a bit, but I often use other scale strip wood sizes when modeling in O scale to add a bit of different thickness to my wood. I actually have laminated the second table and keep it in a spiral bound book for reference.

http://kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-o-12b.htm

http://kapplerusa.com/y2k/text-files/kp-txt-size.htm


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7037 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2015 :  9:18:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The 3 pieces of strip wood have been grained and stained using Silverwood. ( http://www.builders-in-scale.com/bis/parts-weather.html )

I am using multiple applications of the Silverwood with a light sanding every few coats, somewhat copying Chuck Doan's methods. After applying two liberal coats of Silverwood and allowing each coat to fully dry between applications, I have lightly sanded the strips using a 3-M X-Fine Sanding Sponge. I have applied another two coats of Silverwood and will be lightly rubbing with a #0000 steel wool.

The creation of window and door areas of the wall has been completed. I found that it is best to only remove small chunks of foam at a time, pieces about 1/4 of an inch or less in size. If one tries to take larger chunks, the foam may chip in undesired ways. Notice how the foundation floor chipped out under one of the door openings.

Once I had the general door or window area cleared of foam, I used a #17 blade to scrape the foam opening to the correct depth.

For the horizontal window over the middle door I had to modify a Grandt Line casting, part# 5251, Horizontal Window. I removed the window frame from the entire casting as the first step. I then removed one full row of window panes and then one final pane. The resulting casting has only three window panes. As the casting fits somewhat loose in the opening due to the width of the #17 blade, I'll set a scale 1x or 2x12 piece of strip wood into the opening to shim the window into position. This piece of wood will be sitting on top of the metal slider door hanger, so I think that it may be prototypical.

The first picture shows the wall with the door and window openings carved out.

The second picture shows all of the tools used in the carving of the door and window openings. The only tool not shown is the Optivisor, which I wear at all times when at the bench.





-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/07/2015 9:22:22 PM

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quartergauger48
Fireman

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Posted - 04/07/2015 :  11:11:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, thanks for the charts, perfect,,,You have things laid out like a surgeon....I think you are the neatest and most orderly builder on the forum....LOL...
meticulous...indeed'.....



Ted

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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2015 :  11:14:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job on that wall. Looking forward to next steps.

Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/08/2015 :  07:18:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Following along with interest. I'm slowly teaching an old dog a new trick by doing a little of my work in metric.


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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/09/2015 :  4:16:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The 2x8 (3 strips, 24 inches in length) strip wood was rubbed with the steel wool prior to the addition of knot holes. The picture below shows the three pieces of wood with knot holes.



Knot holes are easily overdone, so less is more in this step. I used a #64 wire bit in a pin vise to drill a total of 9 holes total, at random, in the three pieces of strip wood. I then colored the knot holes with a diluted ink stain. I used a #00000 synthetic round brush to color the holes. I dipped the brush into a bottle of ETOH to load the brush with solvent. I then dipped brush tip into the ink bottle lid to load the brush with ink. The brush was then stuck into the drilled holes to color the knot hole while the strip wood was being held down on a paper towel. Some ink did come out the backside of the wood. This excess stain was wiped with a finger. The ink used to color the knot holes is Noodler's Kiowa Pecan, non-waterproof. (Noodler's makes both waterproof and non-waterproof inks, so make sure to use non-waterproof.)

The next step is to cut the strip wood to length. I used a Chopper II to cut the wood to two different lengths to avoid wasted wood.

The picture below shows the tools used in the next few steps to attack the wood. Note that the double sided Scotch Tape will be used in the coloring steps which will come in my next posting.



I cut the strip wood to allow for just a bit of excess wood at the top of the wall. This excess will be removed once the wood is colored and glued to the wall.

The first step was to cut enough wood to cover the larger dark area of the wall. Once I had enough wood strips cut, I then treated the ends of each piece of wood. Holding only three pieces of wood down on the glass plate at a time, the ends were brushed. The wood was then rotated 180 degrees to brush the opposite ends. The pieces of wood were then flipped over and both ends were again brushed. (Brushing is about 10 passes of the wire brush from the glass plate onto the wood and then returning to the starting position on the glass plate. The brush is pressed down on the wood in both the forward and backward brushing movements.) Complete the process on all ends of the cut strip wood.

Once the pieces of wood were brushed, I arranged three pieces of wood so that they were held on edge, like a small fence, and then dipped into the A-I lid to color the brushed ends. (Reference "Lid Stain" on page 1 of this thread, in the Defines section, for a detailed explanation of the weathering process.)

NOTE: It is important to only do three pieces of strip wood at a time. Trying to do more will result in breaking of the strip wood during the brushing process. Also, bundling of the wood and then trying to color the wood ends will result in excess wicking of the stain too high up on the individual boards resulting in a loss of the weathering effect.

The following picture shows the strip wood about to be brushed with the wire brush. Note that I have pictured more than the recommend three pieces of strip wood in this picture, but I wanted to stress that the wire brush starts on the glass plate and is brushed over the edges of strip wood ends.



Once all of the longer pieces of strip wood were cut and grained, I reset the Choppper guide to cut the shorter lengths of strip wood needed to cover the smaller dark area of the angled wall. These pieces were end grained and stained using the same techniques as the longer pieces.

The following two pictures shows the strip wood covering the dark colored area. Each individual board extends past the top edge of the wall. This temporary placement of the wood is to verify that I have cut enough wood to cover the area completely. The wood will be attached to the wall once the wood is colored.

Also notice that the second application of Gesso has further colored the stones a more uniform white color when compared to earlier pictures with a single coat of Gesso.

The strong knot hole coloring will be muted in the next coloring step.





-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/09/2015 4:25:19 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7037 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/09/2015 :  6:36:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice weathering effect on the bottom of those boards Kris.

A great how to do it to go along with the pictures.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9346 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/09/2015 :  8:05:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That wood is looking quite realistic Kris'. Not sure if I understand why there is wood over the stone though, as the stone wall really looks very good and a lot of hard worked detail will be covered.....


Ted

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/12/2015 :  06:18:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks everyone for checking-in and the comments.

Ted: The plans by Mike Blazek have this area "possibly" covered by wood. I too questioned why there would be wood there when I saw the plans, but my original thought was to try to carve wood planks into the foam and then color the foam to reflect aged wood. I decided to fall back on using real wood just for comfort reasons and I also wanted to play with a pan pastel on wood a bit more. My thinking is that there may have been wood siding there due to the mortar failing or that there was some configuration of wood siding in one of the pictures which Mike was using when he drew the plans.

I colored the stones using the following process:
1) Delta Ceramcoat "Bamboo" #02657, applied with a 1/2 inch flat china brush - Dry brushed onto all stone faces.
2) Delta Ceramcoat "Flesh" #02019, applied with a 1/2 inch flat china brush - Dry brushed onto random stone faces.
3) Delta Ceramcoat "Sandstone Grey" #02402 applied with a 1/2 inch flat china brush - Dry brushed onto random stone faces.
4) The above colors were then applied using a #0 round sable, at random picking various stone faces to add accent/fully color.
5) Delta Ceramcoat "Georgia Clay" #02097 was applied in a light dabbing/stippling motion to random stone faces using the #0 round sable.
6) Delta Ceramcoat "Raw Sienna" #02411 was applied in a light dabbing/stippling motion to random stone faces using the #0 round sable.
7) Delta Ceramcoat "Bambi Brown" #02424 was applied in a light dabbing/stippling motion to random stone faces using the #0 round sable.
8) Americana "Burnt Sienna" was applied in a light dabbing/stippling motion to random stone faces using the #0 round sable.
9) The paints were allowed to dry for a hour or two.
10) A wash of Silverwood was applied in various spots to color the mortar using a #8 round/mop. This left the mortar darker colors in areas where the brush was pressed against the wall.
11) Random stone faces were touched-up using random colors from above, applied in a light dabbing/stippling motion to random stone faces using the #0 round sable.
12) The dark area of the wall was touched-up using Ceramcoat "Charcoal" and a #1 round.





** I'm going to return to bed as it's 4am, but I will continue the entry to describe how I colored and applied the wood siding in a few hours. **


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7037 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/12/2015 :  1:12:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking very good Kris

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2015 :  09:15:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all, and thanks everyone for checking-in. Sorry for the delay in getting this thread updated, so let's jump in and 'get-er done'.

This entry will focus on how I colored the boards for the vertical wood siding area of the wall in HO scale. On the first page of this thread I posted the following picture showing where I thought I may go with the coloring of this siding. The sample is O-scale, sitting on top of the balsa foam wall area.


The following picture shows my work area set-up. A few things to note here:
1) Difficult to see, but I have used a strip of double sided Scotch Tape (1/2 inch wide) to hold the wood to the glass plate.
-- The tape extends well past the area where the wood will be to allow the 4 inch triangles to be secured in place.
-- The tape is also placed so that there is approximately 1/2 inch of wood extending past the lower edge of the tape.
==== This will allow for wicking of solvent up the individual boards a small distance at random.
==== I will be able to position the shorter wood pieces with their ends also above the tape edge.
2) I'm using a drafting T-square to assist in the layout of the wood siding. It is necessary to lay out the siding prior to starting the coloring process to keep the 'fading' basically the same across the entire vertical siding area. I used the T-square at the base/foot of the siding instead of the usual strip wood guide (shown just below the T-square) as I'm going to have to remove the guide when I start flooding the boards with solvent.
3) It is important to keep the vertical siding in straight lines and the individual boards tightly together at each board edge. Using the triangles, I'm able to place the 2x8's correctly on the Scotch Tape and verify alignments.


The next picture shows how a small square is used to align the smaller/shorter pieces strip wood. The square was used as it had almost the exact width needed to fit the area where the siding will be applied. Notice also that I'm using the square with the triangle to keep the 2x8's vertical and tight.


The chalk powder needs to be placed on the dry wood surface at about 2/3rd's of the way towards the top of the 2x8's. This is due to the fact that roof eve's often shield the upper part of the siding from weathering, thus the paint remains in tact for a longer period of time.
-- The piece of strip wood indicates the approximate area where the chalk will be applied. The shown placement of the strip wood indicator appears low, or only about 1/2 of the way up the siding, due to the small amount of excess wood extending past the top of the wall.


Below are the materials, minus solvents, used to add color to the walls. The cheap 1/2 inch flat brush was used to apply the Pan Pastel powder to the 2x8 strip wood. The brush was lightly loaded with the pigment, and then lightly tapped over the pigment pan to release excess pigment. The brush was then held over the 2x8 strip wood and the top of the brush handle was light tapped to drop pigment powder onto the 2x8's. The brush was held about 1/2 inch above the wood during this proces.
-- The Pan Pastel is Red Iron Oxide #380.5.
-- The 1/2 inch flat brush was then dipped in ETOH and lightly touched to a paper towel to remove excess.
-- The brush is placed on the strip wood at about 2/3rd's of the way up the siding and the moistened pigment is then wiped towards the top of the siding. This will apply a larger volume of color extending over the upper 1/3rd of the siding.
-- The brush is then placed at about 2/3rd's mark and drawn down towards the bottom of the wood. You will find that the chalk will fade towards the lower part of the boards. Additional solvent(ETOH) is used as needed to achieve the 'fade', pulling excess pigment off the bottom of the board(s) and quickly using a paper towel or rag to remove excess solvent from the glass surface.
-- A different color hue was used to accent the iron oxide base color. I used a soft pastel pencil to apply random color streaks on individual board. The lower 1/3rd of the boards are avoided when applying the accent colors. I used a Conte Pastel Pencil, Vermilion, #03.
-- A smaller amount of solvent was then applied as before to blend the accent color. The volume of solvent in the brush can be controlled by the length of time the brush is held to a paper towel or rag to remove excess solvent from the brush.
-- An old toothbrush was then lightly scrubbed over the wood to further blend the chalks. Again, it is important to blend using the upper 2/3rd upstroke as the first strokes in blending and then blend the lower part of the the siding.
-- Using a #4 round, Silverwood was lightly drawn across the bottom edges of the 2x8's. Excess was blotted up with a paper towel/rag.
-- Notice in the second picture how the loud knot hole coloring has now become muted acts as an accent in the colored wood.
** I did a light application of Silverwood over the entire surface of the siding as a final step. This actually turned out to be an error and visually degraded the wood's color fading and weathered appearance in the lower parts of the siding.**



The siding was then applied to the wall, covering the area painted with the Charcoal craft paint. Wood glue, Tightboand II, was used and applied to the individual 2x8's with a toothpick.
-- I made an error in application of the first few boards resulting in the siding being applied at an angle. The resulting space created when the boards were correctly applied will be covered with a poster or metal sign.
-- I have not applied the 2x8's all the way to the wall end due to the need to carve and color the wall end in a later step. The siding will be added once the carving and coloring of the wall end edge is complete.


A final light wash, very thin, of Raw Sienna was applied to all of the siding surface and then lightly blotted off using a paper towel/rag. The wash was about 15:1, water:paint.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/15/2015 09:18:14 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7037 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2015 :  8:06:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That sure is quite a technical set up application for the weathering process. I just love how meticulous your work process is. And from the look of the coloring, it is well worth it. Text Great job with the Balsa Foam Kris'...


Ted

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