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 New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2015 :  2:38:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Been sitting here trying to determine what is creating the discrepancy in the walls and why they won't match up. Well, silly me... In my rush to start using the new plans from Blazek and the new construction material, I just jumped right in and started carving using wall templates cut from the plans. I was so concerned about the rock carving wrapping around the door and window openings that I totally forgot to account for the wall thickness and the resulting additional wall lengths. Due to the different thicknesses of the foam after cutting the foam width in half, I'm getting strange footprints when the walls are test fitted. A really stupid error on my part.

As this is a test build, I've decided to continue instead of a total restart. Thus this build will also become an exercise in hiding errors.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 6951 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2015 :  6:53:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good modellers are expert at hiding mistakes, Kris.
Hope your health is going better!



Country: France | Posts: 17612 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2015 :  6:59:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK.. after playing with the puzzle pieces I think that I have a quasi plan of attack.

I did not use the spackling paste to fill the seam as I had planned. Could not find the stuff easily in my supply closet. I did however make use of the balsa foam-matte medium paste which I made up earlier to fill seams. I filled the back side/inside angle with the paste, pressing as hard as I dare to force the paste into the seam.

After reviewing the photo's which Cameron supplied, I noted that the corners had some large stones. I used very small amounts of the foam paste to fill some of the mortar lines carved earlier to make a few larger stones on the angle.

I have applied the first coat of Gesso to all of the carved stone. You will note that the Gesso is being absorbed into the foam at different volumes. This is leaving a variation of hues in the foam and may affect the coloring of the stones, an advantage as I want color variations in the walls.

I'm going to apply a second coat of Gesso to the carved surfaces once this coat has dried completely.

The black area on the wall will be covered with vertical wood siding. I have colored this area with Delta Ceramcoat 'Charcoal'. This area was not primed with the Gesso. I want a darker surface behind the wood siding to enhance the knotholes and board edge shadows, as well as a dark background should any background peek out between the individual boards used in the siding.

The first picture shows the overall wall with the angle. Note the various differences in the absorbing of the Gesso.

The second picture is a close up of the angled corner showing some of the 'larger' stones created with the foam dust paste.





-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 6951 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2015 :  7:34:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gesso is neat stuff!

dave



Country: USA | Posts: 6201 Go to Top of Page

CBryars2
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2015 :  10:45:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit CBryars2's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Excellent work, glad pictures helped.

So good to see you back at the work bench.

Cameron



Country: USA | Posts: 775 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2015 :  12:00:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting looking wall.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

Country: USA | Posts: 4129 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  08:35:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit sgtbob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris, I am fascinated by the wonderful job you are doing with balsa foam.

Here is a structure I built about 30 years ago all out of balsa foam, 1/32 scale. At that time
they were also selling a very thin two part clear resin which you brushed onto your finished foam
project. It soaked into the foam and hardened into a very nice hard surface ready for any kind of
painting. I'm sure any of the thin long time setting resins would work as well today.

Cheers,

Bob





http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102&whichpage=1
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=38921
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=45371
http://www.freewebs.com/santmod/

Country: USA | Posts: 2926 Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2015 :  10:08:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris. Just started looking thru this thread, Very interesting.

Hope you have fully recovered from you health issues. Take Care mate

"M"




Country: Australia | Posts: 5705 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2015 :  10:19:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent corner, no hint of a seam. Following with interest.


Country: USA | Posts: 1555 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  11:24:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all for checking in and your continued best wishes. Hope I can continue to hold your interest.

Frederic: I can't agree with you more. One of the "big tricks" to fine modeling has yet again been reviled.

Bob: Wonderful structure. I'm assuming that there are some wood components overlaying the exterior walls and that you did not carve those into the foam. Thanks for sharing. I did not know that the balsa foam product has been around that long.

I have added a second coat of Gesso to the carved wall area. Currently drying but it appears that there will be some variance in the surface hues as pointed out earlier. What I really like however is the very fine surface of the foam, something like a extra fine wet/dry sandpaper even after two thin coats of Gesso.

Just for any newer modelers watching the thread, I'll go thru and show how I'm doing weathering/coloring of the wood siding for this wall.

Below is a picture showing three 24inch long 2x8 pieces of strip wood and my favorite graining tool, a wire brush for cleaning files.
Working on a glass plate, one always draws the wood under the wire brush. If you push, the wood will break.

Oh.. as a side note, the PMRA business card belongs to our own "nhguy". See Bill... Told ya I'd use this card. Only took two years...



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/06/2015 11:41:54 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6951 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  1:31:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit sgtbob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris, Thanks.The downspouts are heavy wire, the window mullions and that bay window that protrudes
are either wood or styrene, I forget which. All else is carved or pressed into the foam wall pieces.

It was not called balsa foam back then, it had some technical name but I have bought balsa foam
since then and it's the same stuff.

Cheers,
Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102&whichpage=1
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=38921
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=45371
http://www.freewebs.com/santmod/

Country: USA | Posts: 2926 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  7:17:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Say Kris, I can't help noticing those charts under the very clean sheet of glass. They look interesting.
May I ask what they are? You certainly have a very neat and organized work station. You ar
e setting a very good example' for the rest of us to follow....




Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4278 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  9:11:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob.. Incredible use of the foam if you carved all of that into the walls to create the 3-D effects. Just goes to show how versatile this foam is.

Ted.. The tables under the glass are just some quick reference tables I reference while modeling. Conversion table, strip wood sizes and x-reference for strip wood part numbers between different mfgs. BTW... Thanks for the complement. Also.. I'm normally not all this clean, but the balsa foam dust keeps me constantly cleaning the work area.

Campbells strip wood sizing chart: https://www.campbellscalemodels.com/Articles.asp?ID=244

Northeastern Scale Lumber Co. - X-ref of part numbers for different strip wood mfgs.
http://www.northeasternscalelumber.com/uploads/pdfs/NESLCatalog_2013.pdf
(I don't see the Mfg. x-ref table anymore in the catalog, but a few useful tables are still in the catalog.)





If one reviews the pictures provided by Cameron, you will note that the windows and doors are placed deep into the walls of the structure.

I have taken an appropriate size Grandt Line window casting and removed the frame edges to create a window to be placed in the wall. (Part# unknown)

I then carved a deep recess into the wall to fit the window.

To keep the depth consistent across all windows and doors, I have decided to use a piece of scale 12x12 wood scrap. By placing the scrap into the carved recess, I can make sure the wood surface is flush with the exterior wall face. If needed, one can carve the hole close to depth and then use the wood to make a depression to the correct depth. Remember, balsa foam has no memory. I decided to make all of my holes one foot deep, although I think the depth on the Polar Star is closer to 16 or 18 inches.

The first picture shows the strip wood being used as a depth gauge. I don't want to use my good metal caliper to measure the depth due to the corrosive nature of balsa foam.

The second picture shows the window being test seated within the window opening.

The third picture shows the window seated in the window opening at an angle so that a sense of the depth can be viewed. I'll carve some mortar lines into the sides as the next step. My aim here is to provide a feeling that the windows and doors are set deeply into the wall structure.







-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/08/2015 04:58:48 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6951 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2015 :  11:07:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice, Kris. The recessed window gives the stone wall mass.


Country: USA | Posts: 1555 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2015 :  11:30:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you very much Kris for the info. I like the charts. And will reference them....



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4278 Go to Top of Page
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