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 New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
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Author Previous Topic: Boxed Pony (Howe) Truss Overpass Topic Next Topic: TT scale projects
Page: of 28

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 03/23/2016 :  11:31:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the update Kris. The two stacks look fabulous.

Was there any difference in the two types of metal when you painted and weathered them?

Goof luck on the move.

I'll mail you tomorrow.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9101 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/24/2016 :  06:00:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good, Kris. I can't wait to hear about the weathering of the stacks....

Cheers,
Jeff.


Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

Country: Ireland | Posts: 362 Go to Top of Page

milocomarty
Fireman



Posted - 03/24/2016 :  06:16:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit milocomarty's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Like it !! Nice build Kris, and a decent step by step !

http://martinwelberg.wordpress.com/
http://cardiganbaycoastalrailroad.wordpress.com/

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 6622 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 03/24/2016 :  08:12:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, your stacks came out looking very nice.
Best of luck with your move!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6827 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/24/2016 :  10:07:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The two different size stacks give a sense of history to the structure. And the stack segment lines were worth the effort.

dave



Country: USA | Posts: 6152 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/03/2016 :  10:41:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry folks, I just made a correction to the water:ink ratio in the post on the previous page. I wanted to also note that I now have a new modeling studio, but the volume of boxes and required time to get moved in means that I will not be modeling for the next two weeks or so, so please stay tuned.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/03/2016 10:42:05 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6923 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 04/03/2016 :  1:08:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris,

How are the new digs?

Cheers,
Jeff.


Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

Country: Ireland | Posts: 362 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 04/12/2016 :  12:02:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Kris, I'll admit to being remiss in following along with your progress diligently. I do however check in from time to time to admire your work.
I just looked at the last couple of pages and followed the progress on the skylights, some nice work there. A couple of things that stood out to me were.... The skylights seem to stand very proud of the roof, plus they just look 'stuck on' and not actually part of the roof or incorporated into it, just sitting on top.

An easy way to blend them down into the roof and also make them appear more than just a late addition would be to add some 'tar' / 'weather seal' around them and then blend this into the roof with some grey chalks.

For a tar seal in the past I have used black caulk applied with a tooth pick, it takes some time but the effect is quite nice and has a tar like 'body' to it. Another option is to put a drop of black craft paint and mix it with yellow wood glue, it still has some body, though not as much.

Once dry follow either of these applications around the skylights with chalk blending and dulling of the black. The 'flashing' should blend colourwise into the roof. This should in my opinion pull the skylights down visually into the roof and make them appear more a part of the structure and built in to the roof as opposed to sitting on top of it.

As always, try it on a scrap piece first to see how it looks.....

Karl.A



Edited by - UKGuy on 04/12/2016 12:19:02 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6067 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 04/12/2016 :  07:51:36 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris- You're doing some really nice work here...

How about a pic of your new digs?



Country: USA | Posts: 2123 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/13/2016 :  11:24:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Gentlemen, I appreciate the feedback and interest in the new studio space.

Karl... I'm elated by having your comments and feedback.
You're absolutely correct in your assessment of the skylights. Besides the plastic window castings in the two roof structures, I'm feeling that the skylights ARE the poorest execution of a component so far on the builld. They look like exactly what they are, a shortcut done in a hurry. The technique of just having a 'black floor' failed to adequately represent the darker mill interior. The skylight frames look like little boxes plopped on top of the roof and I have installed the far left skylight in the wrong location. It should have been on the right end but I was concerned about the space with the waterwheel housing.

I used liquid leading as the adhesive for the skylights. I applied the leading so that there is a bit of adhesive forming a tar seam/seal around the skylight bases. I tried to show the tar seam in an earlier picture, but I believe that the seams are a bit difficult to view.
-- Good idea of using additional tar around the base to further 'pull' the skylights into the roof. I'll give that a shot. --

I really do however appreciate your suggestions and strongly encourage others to make use of the techniques. I'll add that your suggestions are extremely effective when used for chimneys and other roof components. I'll try to provide a better picture once I can find my camera and have a area set-up for photos in the new modeling studio so one can better assess the use of liquid leading.

I would consider a re-do of the skylights if I could easily remove the installed components, but I believe that I'd have to completely build a new roof for the mill and that's just not in the cards. I got in a hurry and tried to shortcut the roof details. I obtained the obviouly poorly constructed and installed components. I just did not realize how much the poor modeling would stand-out as I expected the skylights small size to diminish the short-cuts used. Chalk it up to a sandbox experience.

Carl, thanks for the invitation to show off the new studio. Currently it is just a room full of moving boxes, nothing you have not seen and experienced. So I'm going to hold off with the pictures unit I have the studio and work areas somewhat established. But I'm loving the coloring and lighting of the walls in the room. I think I got it right this time.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 04/13/2016 11:41:00 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 6923 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 04/13/2016 :  8:42:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
If the skylights bother you, 'pop' them off, you will be replacing them (mostly) in the same positions, therefor carefully using a new blade and cutting them off will be easily hidden. As you say, you used a minimum amout of ooze out for the previous adhesion so spending an hour carefully removing them will be time well spent.
I've found that taking 'the plunge' and changing something is much better than having to look at something for months and not be happy with it. It somehow always niggles away at me.
As I said innitiatly, my main concern with them is relative to how 'proud ' they appear to stand up from the roof. Before major surgery try painting the sides (vertical portion) of the skylights in a dark gray and then blending this in with chalks to the roof, this should have the same effect of 'pulling them down' visually into the roof with much less effort. Currently the white sides just 'elevate; and highlight them too much, to my eye.

Karl.A



Edited by - UKGuy on 04/13/2016 8:54:00 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6067 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/14/2016 :  09:56:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris, it's been a while but you're closing in on a really nice build. All this from a set of plans, nice work.


Country: USA | Posts: 3584 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/14/2016 :  11:51:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I concur Frank, this project has been taken substantially longer than I had anticipated. But I've had three surgeries, all requiring time in the ICU post surgery, the death of my last parent and a move to a new home since starting this project. Throw in four modeling clinics presented and the large (4x6 inch) hernia in my abdomen currently along with the DVT' s in the leg and I'm still somewhat surprised/disappointed that I have not yet completed the build. Guess that I've been spending too much time on the various modeling forums.... I'll have to change that soon. I'll have a strong incentive to be at the work bench once the studio is set-up. Speaking of which, guess that I should go work on getting a few more boxes unpacked.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 6923 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/14/2016 :  12:43:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris,
I confess when I first saw your skylights I felt they were not up to your usual standard. But I was not going to say anything until Karl spoke up. I have to concur with his opinion and furthermore agree that you should try to rectify matters either by replacing or modifying them.

First, the walls of the skylight "boxes" look far too thick for the purpose. If the skylights were not open that would not be noticeable, but what you have looks out of scale to me. Second, I think things would look better if the frames of the skylights came out to the full width and height of the "boxes" and did not open. Are you sure they did?

I agree that the skylights very much reflect the fact that they were installed on a completed roof. Because of variations in the roll roofing they also look like they are not lined up completely, although I realize that's sort of an illusion because you showed the spacer you used. The problem is that the roof shows no sign of having been installed around these obstructions. So if you popped the skylights off carefully and rebuilt them, yes there would likely be some damage to the roofing but then your patches and fixes could actually improve the illusion.

I feel bad for what you've been through during the time you've been working on this model and I hope I've been constructive rather than critical. It's quite an amazing model.

Mike



____________________________________
And we gazed upon the chimes of freedom flashing. Bob Dylan

Country: USA | Posts: 2186 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/14/2016 :  4:32:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike. Thanks for the check-in and comments.

First, thanks for the best wishes. But please don't feel sorry for me. There are a lot of folks who are in a lot worse shape, and their family members also need our best wishes. I'm also cancer free, but have had two modeling friends die from the same cancer since my diagnosis. So I'm really thankful for how lucky I've been. My earlier post was just a reminder to self to make the best use of the hobby time.

Please, always feel free to comment about the work I present. It's just a hobby and no one is going to be killed by commenting on a model... at least they better not. Not only do we as model makers get feedback as to how the objects appear to others, but the actual process of trying to evaluate others models helps us to look more carefully and with more considerations about how our own models are constructed. This sharing of information also may help others in their own projects.

Quite frankly, I was stymied as to why nobody called me on the execution of the skylights. When I posted the pictures of the components, I put on my black mask and was looking forward to standing in the back of the crowd. But, your thoughts on the damage and subsequent repair affecting and blending the skylights into the roof are important comments. Along with Karl's input, I now have a idea on how to approach the adjustment.

I think that by cutting a hole into the mill roof for each skylight, I'll be able to mount the skylight box at a angle and partly hide some of the frame sides. With the application of a bit more liquid leading (tar), I should be able to make the skylights appear to be built into the roof. The additional tar seam may help the disparity of the roofing paper seam lines too.

I really have to thank you for taking the time to comment, as it was yours and Karl's input which allowed me to snag the application mentally, but I didn't make the connection untill I had both pieces of the pie.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 6923 Go to Top of Page
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