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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/27/2015 :  2:28:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jerry and Ray for the comments. The input is appreciated.

To start off with, I wanted to note a big warning to anyone who is following my methods to color the corrugated metal roofing.
**DO NOT** spray with a pastel fixative or something like DullCoat. I sprayed a pastel fixative on the metal surface yesterday in a touch-up process and totally, and I mean totally, lost the entire roof . I spent about 6 hours recovering from the error. I went through so many 'fix-its' that I did not keep track of them all. Basically, I ended up going back to ground zero and re-gluing ground pastels to the roof with diluted white glue. I did include a bit of dark violet pastel in the palette, so the recovered roof actually looks just a bit closer to the prototype.

OK... nuff said.

For the next step I have not included a lot of pictures as the process is not difficult to understand or follow.

Add the fascia boards to the waterwheel house:
Materials:
A) HO Scale 2x6 (2 pc - 12 inch length) http://www.kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-ho-12.htm
B) MikeC's Blend #8 Ink Weathering Solution: http://www.rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf (Thanks Walt)
-- 12 oz. 70 % alcohol
-- 3/4 tsp Higgins non-waterproof black
-- (4 oz. water + 1-1/2 tsp D-R Sienna + 1/2 tsp D-R Burnt Umber)

1) Wood Grain (ref. Defines on pg.1) the 2x6 stripwood on all sides.
2) Stain the stripwood with the #8 stain. I applied with a brush to all sides of the stripwood and the pulled the stripwood through a damp paper towel using very light pressure to remove excess stain. Allow the stain to dry.
3) Place the roof on a hard flat surface, but with a single piece of thin soft material to protect the foil from rubbing against the hard surface. This will prevent the roofing from having any foil exposed after the fascia is applied.
4) Add fascia the two ends first. Cut from the stock 2x6 strips which are a bit longer than the width of the matboard.
5) Glue the 2x6 stripwood into place using a wood glue. Place a thin film of glue on the 2x6 and then press the stripwood against the matboard edge, placing the 2x6 on top of the foil. Use a small drafting triangle to press the stripwood flat against the face surface of the matboard. Then use the edge of the triangle to push the stripwood against the matboard edge. This process will also flatten out the metal roofing resulting in approximately a scale 2 inches of roofing extending past/over the fascia stripwood. Allow the glue to dry.
6) Using flush nippers, trim the stripwood flush with the long sides of the stripwood.
7) Cut two lengths of stripwood slightly longer than the metal roofing.
8) Glue the two stripwood pieces into place with the stripwood extending past both ends of the roofing material. Use the small drafting triangle as before to align the 2x6 to the matboard and press the foil roofing into position if necessary.
9) Using flush nippers, trim the two pieces of stripwood flush with the foil edges. Prior to cutting away the excess, place the roof in place on the wheel house. Use the flush edge of the end piece corner board to obtain the correct angle to cut the excess 2x6 fascia board. Use this process to trim all four corners.
10) You should end up with fascia boards with no gap at the junction where the boards meet.
11) Using the #8 staining solution, touch-up the cut ends. Also add a bit of touch-up stain where the fascia boards meet under the ends.
12) If desired, add a bit of diluted #8 stain to the face of the fascia boards with a soft #1 liner brush. Make sure to use clear ETOH as a diluting agent, not water, as the stain is ETOH based.

Oh... for those interested, the second picture most closely resembles the actual metal roofing colors.







-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/28/2015 4:52:09 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/27/2015 :  3:07:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It might have been difficult getting there, but that's a GREAT colour you ended up with.

Cheers,
Jeff.


Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

Country: Ireland | Posts: 367 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/27/2015 :  3:49:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jeff for your kind words. It's great to see you following along.

I have used tissue paper, tape and phone book paper for rolled paper roofing. I tend to use commercial products, like Rusty Stumps products, for my roofing materials.

One aspect of rolled roofing materials in general is the edge of the material. I have used used various techniques to address the edges.

To date, I have found that using either a charcoal stick or Prismacolor Ink Marker to be easiest and most effective.

Dependent on the effect one is attempting to achieve, these two tools offer different effects.

The marker, when using the small end and short brief and light strokes, produce a edge with a larger colored area, like water has seeped under the roofing material and has started to rot.

The charcoal creates a cleaner colored edge, suggesting just a shadow effect.

In the picture below, the marker was used on the larger structure roof, with charcoal being used on the smaller drive-thru roof. You can see the difference the two techniques produce.

As we are moving on to a major asphalt (tar) paper job, I wanted to bring the above information to your attention for consideration.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/27/2015 3:50:19 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 11/27/2015 :  7:02:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, your rusty roof came out looking great!
Nice work!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7152 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/27/2015 :  7:40:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've used marker pens on 'tarpaper' strips, but not charcoal sticks. Great look!

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6447 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 11/27/2015 :  7:45:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jeyjey

It might have been difficult getting there, but that's a GREAT colour you ended up with.



I agree!

BTW, what specifically was the problem with the fixative?



Country: USA | Posts: 3054 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/27/2015 :  11:32:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent job Kris. Glad you hung in there and got the color you were looking for.


Country: USA | Posts: 9369 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/28/2015 :  4:56:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry folks.... just an 'update' to the Build Reference Threads section on page 1 of this thread. I just found an idea for possible use on the attachment cables for the smoke stacks, primarily the ground attachments.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/28/2015 :  6:12:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys for the comments. As always, much appreciated.

Ray: The issue was that when I sprayed the fixative (Krylon Workable Fixatif #1306) the entire roof became a dirty brown, about the color of a medium brown shoe. I lost all red and orange hues. I then tried an application of Rust-All hoping that I could recover the orange hues. No luck, but I did manage to lose almost all colors in big blotches of panels, leaving only that off white color from a ETOH reaction, like one can sometimes get when ETOH is used with Dullcoat. So started the recovery process. It probably would have been easier to just redo the entire roof, but this one was personal as I've had this happen in the past with the Krylon product. Short story is that I ended up redoing the pastel base and then recoloring with the Rust-All and 'Blackwash' products. The big fight was the underlying coat of Krylon, which took a lot to cover. Got it done, but I almost lost the corrugations in the process. Nice thing however was that the violet-purple pastel added to the coloring and provided some subtle 'haze' effect to the final roof coloring.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/28/2015 :  6:49:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like how your roofing came out. It looks good.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

Country: USA | Posts: 4328 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/05/2016 :  2:02:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all. Just a quick update at this time and a quick 'bump' of the thread as I'm doing a Balsa Foam clinic tonight and I will be referencing this thread.

I've been working on the roofing, playing a lot with some materials and paints to determine if I can come up with a bit of a different process for producing asphalt paper roofing strips. I've discovered high-quality archival tissue paper, priced at 26 cents per 2x3 foot sheet, presents a pretty good texture once colored with acrylics. And what's really cool is that it can be made to look pretty worn. The tick I've been playing with for this material is to color the tissue with a very thinned acrylic paint wash, using a high quality acrylic. This allows one to have paper strips to glue down which are very thin and no need for a backing paper. Granted, more work than the standard application processes we usually employ, like painting the paper into place with a paint, but one can obtain an enhanced visual effect from the roofing material. Still refining the process, so I'll report on it later.

During this whole roofing paper experimenting process, I've also been applying some experimentation material to the roof of the mill. The mill roof is now a bit more than half completed. But I've got about 7 pages of notes to condense from the roofing process, and I'll try to get the notes posted in the next few days. (I have to work from a Kindle due to another abdominal hernia, so it's slow going!!) Thanks in advance.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/05/2016 2:22:13 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/05/2016 :  2:58:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris that is starting very nicely.

Looking forward to the tutorial on how this done.

Hey buddy hope your feeling better and the clinic goes well.



Edited by - TRAINS1941 on 01/05/2016 3:00:16 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 9369 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/05/2016 :  3:01:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris, you did get a nice look & texture using that archival tissue paper.
Sorry to read about your hernia, man if it's not one thing it's another.
Best of luck with your clinic tonight!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7152 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/05/2016 :  3:41:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not sure I've mentioned this here, but I've gotten good results with telephone book paper. But you have to spend some attention to make sure the yellow and lettering don't show through your paint.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6447 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/05/2016 :  4:21:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all. I think the clinic will go over well, the last one I did was well received.

Dave... Ya.... I had the same issue. I think, however, that your end product outshines my efforts. I ended up just using the thumb area of the phone book pages to avoid any printing the past few times I've used the method/material. I think this is one of the reasons I have gone on this roofing 'quest'. The texture one gets with the phone book paper works ok, but for a close up and worn paper I was interested in finding something a bit more modeler friendly.

Not sure what Walt is using on his HO scale roofing paper, but the texture is simply outstanding IMO. Beats anything I've ever come across as far as texture in HO scale goes. For folks not interested in producing their own roofing paper, Rusty Stumps provides a great alternative. (Not associated with Rusty Stumps, just a happy customer.)

My issue however is making the paper look a bit 'worn' and the overlapping edges seam. I seam to have problems achieving the look I want with commercial products and with the 'backing' used in a lot of our processes. Thus the protracted investigation for something a bit different. I'm feeling that the archival tissue paper seems to make the leap to the next level and really resolves the overlapping seam issue. The archival tissue also retains the desired texture that the phone paper does not show. The thickness of the tissue eliminates the overemphasized seam overlap issue and seams look really, really natural. I'm still working out a few details of the coloring process however for the creation of the various strips/rolls of the asphalt paper.

BTW... for some of the newer folks... I tend to use the words "Asphalt Paper" instead of "Tar Paper" in my conversations about the roofing paper. I'm attempting to be correct in the nomenclature as several years ago it was pointed out in a construction thread that there is a difference between tar paper and asphalt roofing. Not sure that it really matters that much to us as modelers, but I made a commitment to try to be correct.

Sorry Dave to get so off-beat in the reply to your post. But your suggestion about the use of phone book paper (ala: Nash and Greenburg) is an excellent alternative for a roofing material.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7045 Go to Top of Page
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