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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  12:33:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Color waterwheel house roofing:
Materials:
A) Rust-Oleum Light Grey Auto Primer (Spray Can) #2081.
B) Delta Ceramcoat Asbestos or Charcoal craft paint.
C) Soft Pastel Sticks: Rembrandt Raw Umber #408.7
D) Soft Pastel Sticks: Rembrandt Burnt Sienna #411.3
E) Soft Pastel Sticks: Rembrandt Burnt Sienna #411.5
F) Soft Pastel Sticks: Schmincke Manganese Violet #052 068B.
G) Soft Pastel Sticks: Schmincke English Red #022 073H.
I) Diluted White Glue: 5:1:1-drop / water:glue:liquid dish soap.
J) Rust-All and Rust-All "Blackwash". http://www.rustall.com/HomePage.html
K) Paynes Gray watercolor, preferably in a liquid form. (PH Martain's which I used is no longer available.)

Well, I got a bit ahead of myself in the priming of the sub-roof and corrugated aluminum. As I used Aleene's Tacky Glue I experienced some weeping of the glue onto the corrugated panels which was cleaned with a damp paper towel using a light touch. But a glue sheen remained in some small areas. I also needed to prime the underside foil overhang. My original intent to use the 3M Transfer tape would have had me just painting the underside of the foil overhang. But since I had the glue issue also, I decided it would be better to do a light dusting of the roof surface to cover the glue and smooth out the primer base. I could also at the same time prime the underside of the foil overhang.

1) Spray a light coating of Rust-Oleum Light Grey Auto Primer on the roof panels. The goal here is to just cover any glue sheen and to smooth out the primer base and foil panel edges.
2) Spray the bottom side of the matboard and foil overhang with the primer. Use quick passes so as not to have too much primer on the foil overhang creating runs. Put the roof aside to dry.





3) Paint the underside of the sub-roof with a dark colored paint. I again used the Delta Ceramcoat Asbestos. I used a 3/4-inch angled shader to allow me to paint the edges of the matboard. Allow to dry.



4) Create a small palette of ground soft pastels. I used a metal fingernail file to scrape off a fine pastel powders into a palette dish with small cups.
5) Create a diluted white glue solution. Exact measurements are not critical. The dish soap helps break down the surface tension of the water and allows the chalk to become more of a paste when damp.
6) Use a soft 1/2-inch mop or flat brush to apply the powdered pastels. Dip the brush into the diluted white glue and then lightly tap on a paper towel to remove excess glue solution. Pick up a small amount of pastel powder and then apply to the using a stippling motion. Apply from the top down. Vary the colors as you are applying the pastels with a thin line of red-hue pastels along the outer edges of the roof line where the metal overhang will be.
7) Setting the roof vertical with the top panels at the top edge, apply the white glue solution as needed to create streaks and blend the pastels. Add additional pastel as needed.
8) I lightly scrapped a razor blade edge over the purple chalk while holding the pastel about 2-foot above the roof. This pastel powder was then blended into the roof coloring providing a darker hue in areas of the roof. This was accented with streaks of the powdered pastel and blended into the roof coloring.
9) Keep the roof in a vertical position while allowing the roof coloring to dry.





My roof dried to a stronger brown hue than I expected. I tried to show the color in the close-up picture above.

I am however pleased with the red hues of the top row of corrugated panels. These panels are for sure a bit more red than the rest of the roof, but blend naturally. Same thinking with the edges. I also tried to show this coloring in the close-up of the roof.

I'm still off in my coloring of the roof panels. The maroon is just not there yet when compared to the prototype picture. There are 4 choices at this point.
a) Leave the roof as is. This coloring and texture is more than adequate for most models.
b) Mix up another palette of pastels, with more red and blue hues and apply over the existing base. The danger here is the addition of too much pastel and obscuring the corrugations of the roof.
c) Use a paint wash to further color the roof to the desired hues. The past 4 metal roofs I've done used Vallejo paints. Reference the links at the start of this thread for additional info.
d) Use of a commercial product like Rust-All to further color the roofing.

I **suspect** that I can obtain or come close to the desired coloring by using the Rust-All product. In addition, the Rust-All has a 'bluing' solution which will further add to the blue coloring of the roof and enhance the nail holes and seams. So, this is the option we'll try once the pastel coloring has completely dried.

As always, I want to thank in advance all those who have taken their time to visit and please feel free to comment.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/25/2015 12:44:42 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7005 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  12:36:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fine wallboard sanding screen is a good thing to use to convert pastels to powder, but it might not come out fine enough for what you want.

You could try Pan Pastels to add more rust tones of the right color, although I'm not quite sure how they'll work on the corrugated surface.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6292 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  12:57:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A great suggestion for grinding the pastels Dave. I used the metal nail file due to the very small volume of pastel powder I needed. I doubt that I used more than 1/16th of a teaspoon of each pastel powder.

Your idea of using a Pan Pastel is right in the ball park too. Thanks for taking the time to make the suggestions.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/23/2015 12:59:13 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7005 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  1:30:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris I like the color it came out a lot.

It could use a little more red hue but I would be real careful in doing this.

You are right this would pass inspection for a nice looking metal roof.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/23/2015 :  7:34:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The roof's looking good, Kris. Chalks have a way of changing when they dry compared to when the are wet. It can be a little frustrating, but it looks like you have a handle on it.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 13793 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 11/23/2015 :  8:10:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like a nice rusty colour to me.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6965 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 11/24/2015 :  01:51:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks good so far!

BTW, I like that metal-covered wood shed, very interesting little structure.



Country: USA | Posts: 3028 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2015 :  3:34:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys for the comments.

George and Jerry; You guys are correct in your observations that soft pastels change color hues (dramatically) when drying and that the roof needs more 'red'.

One of my largest modeling obstacles is the shifting of color hues/tones as I'm building. As I build in my weathering during the construction process, I'm always playing the 'guessing' game with weathering and color values.

One of my 'big' tricks is to sneak up on the final color values desired. Due to the color shifts of many mediums when wet vs. dry, one has to pay very careful attention as to if the dry medium will be lighter or darker in tones/hues. Experience is the big teacher here.

As I've noted a couple of times, I'm trying to capture the color values of the 'maroon' colored metal on the dormer roof as seen the prototype picture below. I went too heavy on the brown shades in my original use of the pastels ending up with color values closer to the two panels directly above the window on the right side of the slanted dormer roof. (Reference the close-up picture from the above earlier post to the prototype picture below.)



Color the waterwheel house roofing: --continued--
1) I used Rust-All http://www.rustall.com/HomePage.html to further rust the metal roofing and change the color values more red. Unfortunately, instead of going to a stronger red tone I ended up with more of a orange tone. Below is the roof close-up after a single application of the Rust-All product.



In the pictures above and below, note how the subtle 'red' values are apparent in the top and edges of the roof where special attention was given during the application of the pastels as described. I will also mention that when;
2) I applied the Rust-All, I used a soft #4 sable brush with a stippling motion so as to minimize the loss of the soft pastel coating and texture. The roof was standing at about a 60 degree angle, with the top short panels at the top edge, so that the Rust-All product would run down the roof like rain water. A paper towel was below the bottom edge to wick away excess weathering solution. The roof was placed as near to a 90 degree angle as possible while drying. I allowed the first application of Rust-All to thoroughly dry prior to applying a second coat.



3) I applied a second coat of Rust-All to the roof, again using the same procedure as before. I did not capture any pictures of the roof with the second application, but it turned out to be just a bit more orange-red.

I allowed the second coat of Rust-All to dry overnight.
4) I then applied the 'bluing' or "Blackwash" product from Rust-All. This was applied with the roof sitting on a paper towel to absorb excess solution. I again used a soft #4 brush and a stippling motion to apply the solution. The roof was rotated during the application to capture as much of the solution as possible in the seams between the roof panels. The big trick here is to apply the solution with the roof standing upside down, so that the short 'top' panels are at the base. This will accent the shadow of the seam lines as well as the nail holes. Allow the roof to dry in this upside down position on a paper towel, in as near vertical position as possible.

The application of the 'Blackwash' product did shift the roof color values slightly towards the red hues, as expected. I did not get the strong shift to the maroon color that I wanted however.



While contemplation was ongoing during the drying process, I decided that I wanted to avoid multiple applications of the 'Blackwash' in an attempt to obtain the maroon color desired. This is due to the earlier use of pastels, and the desire to not lose the color/texture produced by the pastels on the metal roof. (Note that I'm already experiencing some issues of texture loss and pastel loss resulting in exposed foil.)

After consulting a color wheel and paint mixing chart, I believe that Paynes Gray will produce the desired maroon color.

I'm currently waiting for the roof to dry. I'll then create a Paynes gray wash to apply.

As a side note.... this is beginning to remind me of the 'pink' water tank episode....


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/25/2015 12:17:40 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7005 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/24/2015 :  4:38:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
It will be interesting to see if you can shift the color towards a more maroon hue. The prototype reminds me of Floquil "Tuscan."

Mike
_____________________________________________


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2416 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2015 :  5:08:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chris your right about one thing that brownish hue you had sure does match the prototype by the window.

I do hope the gray tones it down and goes to the maroon your looking for. Even though I do see some maroon shading coming through.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2015 :  5:11:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One advantage of Pan Pastels is they're much less likely to suffer color shifts from fixative. And in fact, I usually don't use a fixative unless it's on a car that I'll handle a lot or I'm planning some wet overcoats (e.g. a lot of alcohol or water.)

And the advantage I have over the rest of you is my wife is a formally trained artist, so when I need help matching colors, she gets the call :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6292 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/24/2015 :  11:04:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is a great roof Kris'. Looks just like the
real thing'..Nice work'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4491 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/25/2015 :  12:41:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For your modeling consideration.

The thread has shown how to color a corrugated metal roof in brown, brown-orange and red-orange colors.

I used a transparent watercolor wash in the follow step for several reasons.
-- I did not feel that the white glue used with the pastels could continue to hold the pastels to the metal foil and take the continued abuse of multiple washes.
-- I used a watercolor wash instead of a acrylic wash to maintain the texture presented by the pastels. If an acrylic paint would be used in this step, than the fine texture presented by the pastels would probably be lost.
-- I expect that a watercolor will wash will break down into the various component color values. I'm hoping to obtain a gray-blue haze from the lighter values within the Paynes Gray watercolor.

Color the waterwheel house roofing: --continued--

5) Create a wash using a Paynes Gray watercolor. My wash was about a 10:1, water:watercolor. This turned out to be a bit too light. A 6:1 wash would probably present a bit better when dry. The watercolor was applied using the same techniques as the "Blackwash" application applied earlier.

I'm really pleased with the result. While not quite the maroon color values I was attempting to obtain, the watercolor wash provided an outstanding shadow definition between the metal roofing panels and excellent fade patterns on each metal panel.

As the watercolor I used was a monochromatic, I don't think the pigments broke down into the components as I expected. I did get some haze effect, but not as strong as I had hoped for. I suspect that a normal transparent watercolor would actually work better in this instance.

In the pictures below you can see how the wash affected the roof panels, with the outstanding panel definition and panel color fades. Note that the top picture best shows the actual roof colors.

Sorry, but I did not notice the brush hair or that I placed the roof upside down on the structure when staging the photos. Please excuse the oversights.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to comment on the good, bad and ugly.

Next up.... a bit of work on the waterwheel house roof underside.





-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 11/25/2015 2:33:45 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7005 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 11/25/2015 :  2:31:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Okay I think you have this one under complete control.

You can definitely see the color change now more maroon showing.

The hair is a nice touch though!!!!


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 11/25/2015 :  9:44:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yeah, that's really getting close to the color in the prototype pic.


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