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 Layout lighting both external and internal
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Author Previous Topic: Maine Central at Chesuncook Lake:small layoutbuild Topic Next Topic: Splines to risers?
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GreggW
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/27/2007 :  12:46:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, Jeff and Team,

Regarding the UV filtering tubes, I tried to use the link to lightinglouvers as well as a quick google search with no luck in locating UV filters. Are they similar to tube protectors that slip over the tubes and can be used in shop lights? Can you point me in the right direction? Thanks in advance for your help.

Gregg



Country: USA | Posts: 1316 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/27/2007 :  1:49:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GreggW

Mike, Jeff and Team,

Regarding the UV filtering tubes, I tried to use the link to lightinglouvers as well as a quick google search with no luck in locating UV filters. Are they similar to tube protectors that slip over the tubes and can be used in shop lights? Can you point me in the right direction? Thanks in advance for your help.

Gregg



Gregg, I think it's the same thing. Unfortunately, I can't give you a more definite answer because I never followed up on the lightinglouver info that was posted a couple of years ago. For a variety of reasons, I haven't been able to spend enough time in the basement the past two years to worry with the UV color fading problem. Maybe one of the other guys will have a better answer.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

GreggW
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/29/2007 :  12:27:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have located a source for the UV filters. Pegasus makes UV Tube Guards that slip over the flourescent tubes. One drawback is that you must buy a case. Here is the link and phone number for others who may be looking. http://www.pegasusassociates.com/UVtubeguard.jsp (800)392-4818.

Gregg



Country: USA | Posts: 1316 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/09/2007 :  11:46:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The following was posted by Tim Kerkhoff in the Craftsman's Corner.
I have moved it to this thread since here is will always remain on page one of the forum topics and will be easy to find in the future.





Installing lights.

Author Topic
Tim Kerkhoff
Engineer

Premium Member



Posted - 09/09/2007 : 10:03:21 PM
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Good evening,

I have started building a refinery, and one of items on the list is to have working lights. I thought it might be interesting to see how others install lights in their structures. There is so much available from tiny LED's to regular bulbs. Getting the voltage right for all these can be a challenge. Hiding the wires has its own set of problems. Even the color of the lights can be tweaked to obtain just the right condition. Lighting can draw attention to a mini -scene or create a mood in a photograph. Its one of those details that takes planning and skill to accomplish.

So lets have your tips and tricks on how you light the tailights of that car. Or the interior detailed room in your structure. What about exterior lighting on those steel mills that are being built. I am hoping this thread can help serve all of us in how to tackle that lighting challenge.

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Country: USA | Posts: 3351

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member




Posted - 09/09/2007 : 10:51:24 PM
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Great idea for a thread Tim. I haven't really done much of this but would like to, so I'll be curious to see everyone's ideas here as well.



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Country: USA | Posts: 2220








John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/10/2007 :  08:41:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
For tail lights (marker lights) I use two minitronics 1.2mm 16volt bulbs wired in series.
This splits the track voltage in half and gives the bulbs a nice glow.

I have used the tiny LED's for headlights, then sealed them in the housing with epoxy to simulate the lense.

All my buildings use the 12.mm 16 volt bulbs.
I have an old transformer for the ones on the layout.
(I'd like to install some decoders for the buildings so I can adjust them or operate them individually)
Maybe something for my retirement!

-Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

BrianZ
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/11/2007 :  12:33:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great topic Tim,

I have been thinking for a long time how I am going to light my steel mill project. It seems as though I'm going to have to run conduit to every lamp, and there is going to be alot of them on the furnace alone. Hmm I think we need some mini micro mini junction boxes.

I like the way that you did the first LED's on your oil refinery tower. But the conduit would add up quickly if you had more platforms. That's the problem I will have with multiple lights on long walkways and multiple platforms. I know someone here has to have a great idea on how to accomplish this.

I like the mini junction box idea.



Country: USA | Posts: 174 Go to Top of Page

lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 09/11/2007 :  08:51:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I use brass strips for a "bus bar" (pos & neg)
Once the wires are soldered to it and painted it blends right in.
You could even cover the drops (wires to the bulbs)with small tubing.
Nginereing dot com sells some very fine wire and tubing just for that.
-Mj



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 09/11/2007 :  09:48:06 AM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Brian,
I did the same thing that Marty did with brass wire. I used .015 in size which is about an 1" HO scale I think. You can run multiple lights off each of the brass wires. I would highly recommend getting the magnet wire from Ngineering.com as its very small and the insulation melts when you solder it. I plan on posting a few photos that will show you exactly what I did. If you are going to run them in series then you need to change the resistance level to obtain the correct brightness. He has a nifty calculator for this on his site.

The Steel mill and Refinery share some of the same problems in how to hide the wires. I thought about experimenting with fiber optics but I was hoping we could get somebody here that could share their experiences.
Another method I am tossing around, is the use of Nickel print paint. I have used it before with success, but not on something like a refinery, where the distance between point A and B is farther.



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NBandS
Section Hand

Premium Member


Posted - 09/12/2007 :  3:55:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Instead of fiber optics, you might consider adapting a light pipe of the sort used to bring light from a PCB-mounted LED to a panel indicator--they come in various lengths and shapes. Might let you use a single LED inside a structure to provide light to several points on its surface.


Country: USA | Posts: 94 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 02/23/2008 :  10:19:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Guys,
I have been reading this topic with great interest as I am at the stage of trying ot finish the lighting. I think I did it right, by doing the lighting and working my way down to the RR. My RR is a dogbone along 2 walls 12' and 10' ON30, primarily on one level. I certainly understand the flouresent issue versus the incandensent issue. I have installed 4 4' single tube flouresents. After much consternation I purchased Phillips Daylight Deluxe 40watt bulbs, 2325Lumens, color rendering 84 and color temp 6500K. by comparing from one of my digital cameras I and setting several mini modules in there I need to add some incandesent lights. I have the room, no problem. Your thoughts...

This image has both normal room incandesents and flouresents working...

and here is nearly same view with incandsents turned off.


Your thoughts and suggestions...

Les
Mclean Virginia



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/23/2008 :  11:00:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Les, I do think you did it right! With many of us, the temptation is get to work on the layout, and then at some point, 'oh yes, the lighting and a valence.' Your efforts will pay off and it looks great!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 02/23/2008 :  11:18:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You will have more than sufficient lighting Les, and with the spot lighting, it will make a nice layout for photography. Good work going on there.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast
Post count: 5000 posts added to below count.

Country: USA | Posts: 15000 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 02/25/2008 :  9:44:15 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Les,

I think it looks very nice, I find I like incandescent lighting the best as its a warmer light. Changing the cool white fluorescents to the sunlight type is a very good decision IMO. However, most fluorescent fixtures are not made to be dimmed. Are you planning on dimming the lights sometime?
I really like the valance and that you chose to do this prior to building the layout.



Country: USA | Posts: 5879 Go to Top of Page

Allegheny2-6-6-6
New Hire

Posted - 02/27/2008 :  10:28:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've read where you can use a small flourescent light fixture at the lower edge of your backdrop to eliminate shadows. Basiclly the light shine upward onto the backdrop and washesout the shadows of the buildings tress etc. cause by the room lighting.

Has anyone tried this and if so was it sucessful? I'm building a new pike whihc will be rather large so I'm doing a lot of planning. I really am trying not to have to retrofit anything on the layout. It never fails after I have sceneary switchs balast etc. in place it's Oh crap let me do this now and it's to be compaired to a bull in a china shop. Never a good thing.



Country: USA | Posts: 28 Go to Top of Page

lazerman
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2009 :  11:52:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit lazerman's Homepage  Reply with Quote
that would get u a passing grade for mil-spec solder class on JTS-mil-002 point to point solder, but u would need a small pc.of shrink tubing on the sec. row of resistors,, awesome job indeed. i can image what your wiring is like,if u solder like this,,

lazerrailways.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1239 Go to Top of Page
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