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[ Active Members: 2 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 86 ]  [ Total: 88 ]  [ Newest Member: dtrocket ]
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 Layout lighting both external and internal
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Author Previous Topic: Maine Central at Chesuncook Lake:small layoutbuild Topic Next Topic: Splines to risers?
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jeffjan2001
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/31/2006 :  11:10:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit jeffjan2001's Homepage  Send jeffjan2001 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Should I be looking for a fixture that takes more than 40 watt tubes?


Dutchman,
i wouldn't think that you'd need that much light... i use double 32W over my work bench and have plenty of light. it might even be too much, depending on the lighting effect the you want.
somewhere in here i posted a link to some tube sleeves to protect the bulbs and also color/filter the light a bit.
it may take a bit of testing, but i wouldn't think that you'd need 80W of light.


Jeff
Spitton, Bailey & Wyre RR
"We'll get you there even if we have to get out and push!"
http://www.trainweb.org/sbwrr
Loosely Based on the Camas Prairie RR in Northern ID

Country: USA | Posts: 198 Go to Top of Page

Eddie Landreth
Fireman

Posted - 02/01/2006 :  12:11:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bruce,

You've seen overall pics of my layout so you have an idea of the amount of light on it. To me, it is very well lit. I have a couple of places where it is a little dim because there's an enclosed ductwork above it so the lights can be placed directly over the layout there (about 3' wide area), but they get side lighting from the lights on either side. I use 8' fluorescent tubes, 40 watt bulbs made by Philips called "Daylight". They have a more natural (blueish) coloring to them than say the Cool White ones (which are more yellowish). I have the fixtures end to end around the perimeter of the layout and behind a valance. Whether you want a cover or not probably depends on whether you'll have a valance and whether you think there's danger of banging into the bulbs. The covers will probably cut down on some of the light given off. I don't have covers on mine.



Country: USA | Posts: 2714 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 02/01/2006 :  06:17:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Eddie, something about your post does not ring true to me, the smallest 8' bulb I know of is 59 watts
http://www.whatwatt.com/product_detail.php?ProductID=717
please enlighten me if I'm wrong, but 4' comes in either 40 or more commonly now 32 watt with electronic ballasts, in my opinion are much better as they will start at more extreme temps and don't hum like conventional ones.
Bruce , I would stay away from the one with the plastic cover, as it will turn yellow and collect bugs, neither a great attraction for your visitors. If you are worried about the bulb breaking I would buy the plastic tubes like in the restaraunts,
http://store.yahoo.com/allbulbs/4fttubecovers.html
these can easily be washed or replaced if too far gone. Pat



Country: USA | Posts: 4503 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 02/01/2006 :  10:33:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, if you remember my layout's lighting, it is end to end 4 foot flourescent tubes. I used single tubes because the layout is so narrow. I use GE Chroma 50 tubes, which give the closest rendition to natural light. The idea was to replicate daylight, so I could get some good photos with "daylight" film. Well, now that we've gone all digital, that isn't so important, as the camera can be adjusted for the light source. Still, I think it looks good.
I use diffusers, too, to filter out the UV rays, which will dull the scenery. One other thing...the flourescent tubes don't give off much heat, either, so the layout room doesn't have huge temperature swings.

Oh, and one more thing...don't forget that scenery absorbs light. At my last layout, in another house, I finished the layout room first, including suspended ceiling and flourescent lights. Well, after the layout was well along and lots of scenery installed, I realized the room was too dark. So, we had to retrofit the lighting after the fact, so to speak. Not fun. Bottom line, put in more than you think you need...you'll be glad you did.



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 04/02/2006 :  7:13:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I use a combination of flourescent and incandescent lighting behind a black valence to give my layout that "shadowbox" effect you often see in museums. I also painted the fascia black and hung black curtains. All a visitor sees when they enter the layout room is the beautiful landscape of New England as planned.

I've recently purchased new flourescent tubes in the Tunsten range which mimics natural sunlight...and I must admit that photos turn out very realistically as a result.



Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Edited by - Mike Hamer on 04/10/2006 09:36:53 AM

Country: | Posts: 11492 Go to Top of Page

Mark R.
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 05/27/2007 :  12:47:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mark R.'s Homepage  Reply with Quote
Structure lighting really adds to the atmosphere on the layout and I like to add as many lights as possible to each scene. I use mostly a mix of electroluminescence signs and LEDs for all my lighting.

Here's a motel scene during the day ....



And the same scene at night ....



Next door to the motel is this diner (still in the works) ....



Here is an overall shot of Binghamton ....



Mark.



Country: Canada | Posts: 379 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/28/2007 :  6:35:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark
Your night pictures are very impressive. They really give us the impression we've just reached this motel or dinner, or this town, after a long trip ending late in the night. Outstanding modelling.
Could you explain what products and techniques you used to do this?



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/28/2007 :  7:06:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Mark, as if your pics in the other thread aren't good enough, then you have to go and post these! Very, very nice! I too would be interested in how you achieved the neon effect on the diner. And the Motel, the more you look, the more you see, such as the TV on the inside of the one room? That's an incredible amount of lighting detail!!!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/28/2007 :  7:30:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, you've done it again Mark. You've posted pictures of your layout that would fool most people into thinking they were the real thing. Well done. Thanks again for sharing.


Country: USA | Posts: 23198 Go to Top of Page

Quinn222
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/28/2007 :  8:30:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That looks great Mark. I'm still trying to figure out how to add a single porch light to a structure so I'm doubly impressed.


Country: USA | Posts: 1139 Go to Top of Page

Mark R.
Engine Wiper

Premium Member


Posted - 05/28/2007 :  9:32:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mark R.'s Homepage  Reply with Quote
I use LEDs almost exclusively for my layout lighting. The city scene shown above is all LEDs. You can literally run hundreds ( and I have ! ) off of one power supply.
With all the variations in LED colors and shapes, you can create all kinds of effects. For the "neon" lighting on my diner, I used some rectangular LEDs that have a very thin lense on them ....



By gluing them side by side, when illuminated, they give the illusion of being one continuous strip of light. The picture below shows the underside of the roof of another diner I'm in the process of building. This diner will only have a single "neon" strip. As you can see, each LED has its own resistor wired to a common buss. The wiring can get almost to the point of surgical skills .... the diner in my other picture with the yellow and green LEDs has all of this .... TWICE !!! ....



Mark.



Edited by - Mark R. on 05/28/2007 9:33:39 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 379 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/29/2007 :  12:19:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good grief Mark, that's an incredible effort for a simple little neon strip, but the effect is outstanding! It is painfully apparent that you have put a lot of effort into this. Excellent work!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13728 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/29/2007 :  03:21:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the info Mark. I don't know if I could ever have the courage to tackle a project like your home made neon strip. That's quite impressive.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

simon1966
Fireman



Posted - 05/29/2007 :  07:47:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit simon1966's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mark, that is some very neat and impressive soldering work. I bet the underside of your layout is a masterpiece of perfect wiring?

I don't think anyone has mentioned power supplies for the lighting on the layout. I have been using a power supply salvaged from an old PC (We all have one or 5 of these). With modifications I found on the web I run 5V and 12V power bus lines around the layout and tap into them as needed for my lighting projects.



Country: USA | Posts: 2861 Go to Top of Page

jaynjay
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/29/2007 :  09:17:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit jaynjay's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mark R.



By gluing them side by side, when illuminated, they give the illusion of being one continuous strip of light. The picture below shows the underside of the roof of another diner I'm in the process of building. This diner will only have a single "neon" strip. As you can see, each LED has its own resistor wired to a common buss. The wiring can get almost to the point of surgical skills .... the diner in my other picture with the yellow and green LEDs has all of this .... TWICE !!! ....



Mark.



Mark,
When it comes to electrical work, I can barely change the batteries in my flashlight. Outstanding work


John

Country: USA | Posts: 5716 Go to Top of Page
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