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Author Previous Topic: Turnout/Track Compatibility Topic Next Topic: A small expansion to my layout.
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Bbags
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  09:49:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting and very informative.
My question is the same as George's concerning the set up time.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

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MikeC
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  10:23:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks good, Bruce. I bought a 1lb. package of Celluclay yesterday at Michaels. Now I need to find the vermiculite and get a bottle of Lysol, and then I'll be ready to try this stuff.




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Cletus
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/16/2005 :  1:05:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Cletus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike... I had a heck of a time trying to find lysol. Fact is, you can use other brands. i use pine sol instead. Plus it has a nicer smell. :D
Set up time is going to vary depending on thickness. But the look of what Bruce used, I would give it a good two to three days to set up. Which once again is an advantage i feel.

Cletus



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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  5:33:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Guys, some observations and answers, and I hope that Cletus jumps in since he has more experience.

Lou Sassi suggests working on 1 square foot at a time. In other words, spread out about 1 sq. ft. of goop, add the layers of scenery, spray with wet water, add the glue, and move on. I think my area was somewhere between 1.5 and 2 sq. ft. It got firmer, but could still be worked with the palette knife.

I was adding the goop over a painted plywood surface. If I were adding it over a plaster of some other water absorbing surface, I think that I would wet the area a bit first, so the water was not prematurely sucked out of the goop.

I spread the goop after supper, both times that I have used it so far. By moring, you could still leave an imprint in it by pressing down with your finger, but you could vacuum off the excess ground cover. By the next evening, I felt comfortable working around it, and by the following morning I considered it firm--although Cletus might be correct in stating that it continued to cure for a few more days.

Now, here is where I hope that Cletus can join in. I have tried two ways of preparing spots for strutures. In the first batch, I set the structure into the wet goop, and nestled it down a bit so it looked like the landscape was natural around it. The result was that some of the glue on the bottom of the structue came undone. Now I built the kit so long ago that I don't remember if I used white glue or yellow glue (it was a laser-cut kit with a solid thin plywood base), but I decided not to "plant" the kits the next time. In fact, I only had one kit built yet, and I wanted to leave an exposed area for a second structure-hence the pieces of plywood. Rick, I did try to nestle them down a bit below the surface. However, the plan did not work out very well. When I tried to pick up the plywood as soon as I had completed adding the layers of ground cover, a significant amount of goop stuck to the bottom of the plywood. I ended up trying to smooth the area with the palette knife.

So, the first two methods of installing wood structures has not been that successful. Now, I will be able to place the structures in the areas that I have prepared, and add some scenery around it, and it should look fine. However, I am going to try another method tonight. I have a structure that isn't built yet, but I do know the dimensions of its footprint. I am going to take a piece of styrene, cut to those dimensions, and set it into the goop and leave it there as the base for the structure. That should work out better.

Anyone have any ideas of how to leave space for additonal future structues if their footprints are not net known?

Anyway, even with these little glitches, I do like the medium, and will contine to use it.

Cletus, how thin have you applied the goop? Conversely, how thick have you applied it?


Bruce

Edited by - Dutchman on 11/16/2005 5:36:34 PM

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MikeC
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  5:55:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, from your comments, working with Goop sounds a lot like working with my "pre-colored" Sculptamold. It can take anywhere from several hours to as much as a couple of days to dry, depending upon how moist it is to start with and the time of year it's applied (because of varying humidity levels.) I have long thought, however, the drying time was affected by the addition of the paint to the Sculptamold. Perhaps it's the same with Goop.

Cletus, thanks for the tip on the Pine-Sol. We always have some of that (or one of the generic equivalents) around here.




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Cletus
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/16/2005 :  7:01:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit Cletus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman



Cletus, how thin have you applied the goop? Conversely, how thick have you applied it?



I have applied it roughly an 1/8 inch for some areas (such as dirt roads) and 1/4 to 1/2 inch to level off some areas. Usually about 1/4 inch.

The drying time you mention is pretty much correct and what I experience when it is out in the air. I imagine that since the last step in making it is to add water, this would cause a variation in drying time. I usually go for the moisture mixture consistency. Just my preference. To give an idea.... you can still ball mine up and it will stay balled up. But it is still spreadable. Pressing the pallatte (sp?) knife flat into it will cause a little water at the edge.

As to placing buildings... hmmm. I placed one with a foundtion into it as you did. I had used yellow glue, so no problems there.

I have also placed buildings and worked the goop up to it. You have to go slow, but it worked out fine. If it is not on a foundation where you can "loose" a little into the ground, then you could do as you say and place a thickness of styrene, thin styrofoam or something that won't warp as a sort of riser. Perhaps some cork road bed cut as a sub foundation and then work the goop up to that, and when the building is finally placed, touch up the area next to the foundation.

I find the goop so easy to control that a little touching up close to the foundation is rather easy.

If I am using ground foam, I place while still wet and spray and soak with wet water and glue. If using static grass, I soak well and then rub the grass between my fingers and let it set. But in all casses, I like to add ground cover as much as possible after I apply it but before it is dried a day or two. Though you can still do that.

Cletus




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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  7:26:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cletus,
Thanks for the info. One more question came to mind. Have you ever tried cutting into the goop once it dried? Maybe if it were dampened again? If that works, the space for the building could be cut out of the terrain after the goop had dried.

I just finished another section with goop. I ran a little short, so tomorrow night I will make up one more batch to finishe this area up. The goop that I had stored in a covered tupperware container for the past week was still like new. How long can it keep?


Bruce

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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  7:42:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here are a few pictures of goop covered areas.









Bruce

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MikeC
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  7:53:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After seeing your photos, Bruce, I know I've got to try it now. Nice work!




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George D
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Posted - 11/16/2005 :  8:30:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the good info Bruce and Cletus. I like those results Bruce. I'm going to give it a try next time I'm doing some scenery work.

George



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Cletus
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/16/2005 :  9:01:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Cletus's Homepage  Reply with Quote
See Bruce isn't it terrific. It just looks so good! As to your other question about cutting, yes I have done that.... most recently when I added the new section to the layout and had to cut into the one section to join the layout. It is fine to cut into. Not as bad as plaster, but it is hard textured. So do not cut yourself by mistake !!! :D

I am thinking now that if you cut out a space, it is still going to require a touch up around the building. So I am not so sure it would be worthwhile as opposed to say using the styrene or styrofoam to block off a bit. Perhaps use some bass or balsa strips 1/4 square to create a boarder/frame that the building would "fit into" then when gooping up to the framed section, you could leave the ground goop just a hair higher and once the building is in place, cover the tops of the frame with more goop up to the building. If you use the building while framing it in, you may not even have to glue the building down, just set it inside the frame and goop up to it.

Another idea I have used to make flat molds of plaster. Build a frame with wood (probably still use a thicker balsa piece) and use brads (left partially sticking up) to tack it into place, Mkae it the exact size of the building foundation. Once the goop is placed, but before it is 100% cured, remove the brads with a needle nose and the wood. You could grease or vaseline the wood to let it pull from the goop easier and without disturbance the next day.

Just some ideas off the top of my head.
Cletus



Country: USA | Posts: 497 Go to Top of Page

n/a
deleted



Posted - 11/17/2005 :  09:30:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce and Cletus,
Real interesting thread!!I was thinking about the placement of the buildings "problem". Have you tried placing some "Saran" wrap sprayed with "Pam" under the base of the building? The "goop" and the building might not stick to each other. Just a thought.
GaryQ



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jeffjan2001
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/17/2005 :  10:39:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit jeffjan2001's Homepage  Send jeffjan2001 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by painter62

Bruce and Cletus,
Real interesting thread!!I was thinking about the placement of the buildings "problem". Have you tried placing some "Saran" wrap sprayed with "Pam" under the base of the building? The "goop" and the building might not stick to each other. Just a thought.
GaryQ



I was thinking Wax Paper around a block of wood or some other "dam"... same result.


Jeff
Spitton, Bailey & Wyre RR
"We'll get you there even if we have to get out and push!"
http://www.trainweb.org/sbwrr
Loosely Based on the Camas Prairie RR in Northern ID

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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/18/2005 :  06:54:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gary & Jeff,
Thanks for the additional suggestions. The next time I try placing a structure into the wet goop, I'll give them a try.


Bruce

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Drew
Fireman



Posted - 12/03/2005 :  10:36:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
LOOKS LIKE MY LAZINESS MAY HAVE PAID OFF


My wife started bugging me back in Aug. to pull these weeds out of the garden...I kept telling her I would get around to it...
Well, it's Dec. now, & it looks like I have a healthy crop of freeze-dried trees for my layout!




-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

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