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Author Previous Topic: Turnout/Track Compatibility Topic Next Topic: A small expansion to my layout.
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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 06/12/2006 :  7:54:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey Steve...I really like the green coloured appearance of the creek below the trestle. With those murky creek beds, I imagine it would be the colour of the local runoff and sediment and silt in the water. Really nice effect!

Bruce, I'm anxious to see the finished look of your waterfall. I think that waterfalls must be one of those trickier scenes to model...hmmm, perhaps I can experiment on one of my buddy's layouts who still require scenicking!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 06/12/2006 :  8:17:50 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Ok I am going to try a few test ponds first and see how it goes. When I look at the water in the stream that I am modeling it is muddy looking but it is not all the same shades. I am not sure how to model that. Seems like if I make the water muddy then the whole thing will be one color. If I paint the bottom and leave the resin clear it won't look right either. I will try a few pours and see how it comes out.

Thanks for all the tips.

I plan on using Envirotex, and a clear resin that I got from Bragdon enterprise.

Nbands, thanks for posting the sheet on Envirotex.



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Dreamweaver
Crew Chief



Posted - 06/13/2006 :  03:08:35 AM  Show Profile  Send Dreamweaver a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hi All,

Here's some more shots









Mike J



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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 06/13/2006 :  07:00:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Nice photos, Mike. I really like the low angle! The first shot taken from the perspective of a railfan in the trees really makes the viewer feel as if they're in the scene. Your modern structures are wonderful. I presume they are scratchbuilt? Great work, Mike, as always!

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 06/13/2006 :  3:22:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Tim, regarding muddy ponds, you might look at Harold Minkewitz (sp?) web site...he was posting quite a bit of scenery techniques on here in the last year, but I haven't seen much from him lately. However, he has a great web site with a lot of excellent tutorials on them. Check it out:

http://www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/



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Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/16/2006 :  08:46:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The following information was posted in another thread and since it is directly related to an aspect of scenery I have moved duplicated the information to this thread.
It was posted my Tom Johnson(INRAIL).
The topic is making roads.

I made the roads using Highball N scale cinder ballast. I ran a strip of masking tape down both sides of the road to give me somewhat of an even edge. I took spoon fulls of the N scale ballast and sprinkled it down from about 12 or so inches above the road which allows it to come down lightly and gives a fairly even surface. It will cover the masking tape on the edges but don't worry about that. You will pull the tape up later. After making sure the surface looks even and with a small hump in the middle, I sprayed the road with water mixed with Dawn or other dish soap in an old hairspray bottle. I sprayed from high above first to get the surface wet so the ballast didn't blow away by having the hairspray bottle too close. After the surface got wet, I got closer with the hairspray bottle and really soaked the ballast. Next, I applied Elmer's glue and water mixed at almost 50/50 to the wet ballast. Keep the bottle close so it flows into the ballast evenly. If you allow the glue to fall from a higher level, it will leave craters and sometimes bubbles. Now here is the important step. Allow all of this to dry to where you don't not see the white from the Elmer's glue. I would even allow it to dry beyond this. I am not sure on time. I just sort of watch it until it is just damp and not really wet. Pull the masking tape up from the edges and tamp down the edges with your fingers or a piece of wood. The next step is to tamp down all of the ballast with a piece of wood that has a flat surface. This does not have to be really big. Lightly tamp down the ballast so the surface is smooth and not rough. Be carefull! The ballast can stick to your block of wood if it is too wet. The secret is to tamp with light quick touches to the surface of the ballast. It goes a lot faster than all of this explanation and is easy once you get the hang of it. I would practice first to get the "right touch." After a couple days drying time, I do weather the surface where all of the car traffic runs with Floquil Grimey Black and some Engine Black mixed in since the grimey black tends to be too gray. Whew! I hope all of this makes some sense.

I paint the cracks on with Floquil engine black. I thin it down a little and use a fine brush. The yellow and white lines are painted with acrylic or water based paint. I put down two pieces of masking tape leaving a narrow space for one stripe and dry brush the yellow onto the surface. Scrub most of the paint out of your brush on a rag and sort of scrub it onto the surface of your road. If you need to add more, go back and get some more, scrub some of it out of your brush, and apply another coat. This will give it that worn look. Pull the masking tape up and apply two more rows of tape for the other yellow line beside the one you just made and do the same thing all over again. This will give you the two solid yellow lines for a no passing zone. If you want the dashed lines for passing zone, do everything above but add thin pieces of tape crosswise to the tape for the stripe itself and drybrush the yellow on. I have even painted solid yellow lines and have.


The following was asked as a question.

Also you mentoined on two occasions the weathering with the grimey black and engine black,what is the ratio you mix too and do you thin it to apply it to the roads? When you do your "cracks" do you first score them into the road or just paint them on? On the tamping do you find it neccesary to sand the corner of the block as to reduce the corner digging in or is it solid enough when you are to this point that its not an issue? I did not read anywhere that you use dullcoat on them, does the final coat of paint make your cinders appear nice and flat?

Here is Tom's answer to that question.
Yes, it helps to sand the edge of the wood. I sometimes even tamp it down with my fingers after the block of wood. The tamping pushes the ballast down to give the surface more of a smooth look. I usually push down the edges of the road with by fingers. Like I said in my earlier post, you have to let the glue and water dry quite a bit before doing any of this. That is why you should practice this first. Someone told me that Highball changed the color of their cinder ballast. I hope not because that is what helps give the surface more of a faded look. Don't forget to really wet down the ballast with dish soap and water. Get it really wet. If the glue and water causes bubbles or craters, you can usually push them out with your fingers and smooth things out. I do weather the surface of my roads some with grimey black with a darker mix with grimey black and engine black where the tires roll on the roads (after everything is dry of course). Be careful and don't over do it. You will still be able to see the cinder look through all of this. Like I said before, pratice, practice, practice. I do not flat finish my roads





More pictures can been seen in the following thread.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=12901




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 06/24/2006 :  10:47:57 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I have been making progress on the scenery and since I am waiting on the Hydrocal to come in I decided to move on.

First of all to show you where I started. No backdrop, no fascia, no scenery, just a big open space that needs help.




If you look back in the thread you will see how I made the lift out mountain and carved in the terrain. You can see on the left where I started adding rock moulds but I did not like using plaster of paris and decided to wait until I received some hydrocal plaster. I set the whole thing back in place so I could see where I was.



You can see that a backdrop has been added and so has a fascia. The pink foam to the left of the mountain is the section I have been working on recently.



First thing was to get a substructure for the scenery, I used a 2" thick styrofoam that has some bracing underneath.



This is an overall shot after I added more foam on top of the sub-structure and ground away to create the terrain.



This picture is looking back to the new portal that I will build up tomorrow. You can see the rolling terrain, but there is quite a bit of rock work on this side of the mountain as well.



Now you are looking the other way and toward the Riverdale yard. I am hoping to get some plaster on this tomorrow to give it more strength but also get rid of that PINK!


I am looking forward to making progress on the rock work next week, once I receive the hydrocal.



Country: USA | Posts: 5879 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/25/2006 :  01:18:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tim, I've been following your work and either I wasn't paying attention or simply didn't notice, but I finally realized that under all that foam there is a helix! A great job hiding the helix, but also the way your scenery will dwarf the trains! I can't wait to see it progress. Keep the pics coming!

Mark

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Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 06/25/2006 :  5:17:11 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Mark, your right it is a helix to hide. I am looking forward to making more progress, but today is a good day to rest


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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 06/25/2006 :  5:34:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
John, thanks for re-posting Tom's excellent tutorial on roads over here in the scenery section. I have a buddy about to create some roads on his layout, so I'll recommend he check out the "ballast" method.

Tim, yes..your layout is really taking shape! I know you're working away at it at quite the pace...do you ever treat yourself to running a train over those great distances...or will you wait until the scenery is in place?


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/25/2006 :  8:57:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tim,
You are making great progress and I think this will be stunning when completed.
Thanks for all the pictures and your descriptions for they are worth their weight in gold.
Looking forward to more progress pictures.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 06/25/2006 :  9:38:30 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the nice comments, it is appreciated.
Mike, when it comes to running on your own layout, you really don't get much of a chance because you are always working on it. When I do get everything ready to run for tours or visitors I usually run trains for a day or so then I go back to work on the layout. Scenery is the one problem that normally shuts down my layout due to the mess. To answer your question I will wait till this project is either complete or close to it before running trains again.
I am lucky in that I can run trains on a number of the other layouts in the area during op sessions and that fulfills my desire's currently.



Country: USA | Posts: 5879 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 06/25/2006 :  10:08:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tim, glad to hear you've got some other layouts around to run. I recall the first year when I was building my layout. After one month, the tracklaying was complete so I began running weekly sessions every Friday evening. I worked on scenery in between these sessions. I tell you, Thursday evening was always "clean-up time".

Because my layout was the only one in the operating group at the time, it was human nature to want to impress the guys with another scene completed on the layout or a new stand of trees...etc. Before I knew, the layout was completed in one calendar year!

Mind you, my room is 11x13 and your empire is considerably larger! Today, we have about 20 Friday Nighters of which at least a dozen show up at any session and we're running trains on half a dozen layouts regularly with outside visits every 7th session or so.

Keep up with the phenomenal progress there Tim...and I truly enjoy visiting your thread to see how things are developing!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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Drew
Fireman



Posted - 07/10/2006 :  11:28:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I’ll try & do a little step-by step here on how I make loose rock for use with scenery…
Whenever I do anything with plaster of paris, or hydrocal, I end up with little bits left in the bottom of the mixing bowl that I have to break up to clean out the bowl…Instead of throwing these away, I save them in a tin can…


These always come in handy for scenery purposes…Whenever I need them, I just dump a few into a small bowl …


I add a black wash of India ink, & rubbing alcohol, & stir with a popsickle stick…


Next, I and some earth colored acrylic paint, & stir some more…


Here’s what I end up with…


I just use this as another element of ground cover…I glue them down with full-strength white glue, & then flow diluted white glue over them…then I sprinkle on some dirt, bits of ground foam, twigs, etc…It just adds a little more texture to the scenery…



-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

Country: USA | Posts: 1173 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 07/12/2006 :  6:04:37 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Nice tutorial Drew, I normally spray mine with different washes but I really think your way is better.


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