Railroad Line Forums - Backdrops
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 4 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 130 ]  [ Total: 134 ]  [ Newest Member: lumberfan ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Model Railroad Construction
 Backdrops
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Topic Next Topic: Turnout/Track Compatibility
Page: of 23

andykins
Fireman

Posted - 07/25/2011 :  4:19:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit andykins's Homepage  Reply with Quote
yeah thats why i thought, but the layout will spend most of its like boxed up in the dark, so i am not so worried about uv, im not sure how mine are printed, but they come from a photographic company on good poster paper. my main worry is just with water, this is why ive been very backwerds about it, normaly id have put the backscene on before glueing buildings down and scenry, but since it was going to get wet while setting the tile grout thought id leave to after. bit chackhandded.



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 4279 Go to Top of Page

Georgia Gulf
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/23/2013 :  11:07:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
These printed background buildings I've got suggest matt spray varnish so the Spray you used on Club night should work equally well.
Nick



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 121 Go to Top of Page

dcyale
New Hire

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  12:47:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit dcyale's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I did not look at all 21 pages of messages in this topic, but there is a Flickr group that people have posted photographs suitable for use in back drops. The url is http://www.flickr.com/groups/mrh_photo_backdrop_repository/pool

Dave Yale



Country: USA | Posts: 11 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/19/2015 :  6:56:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would like some advice, and this thread hasn't been active in a while. I want to try making my own backdrops from photos. Everything I have found on line relates to Photoshop. Photoshop went to a subscription basis last Spring, and I don't want to shell out that kind of money. I am considering Corel Paintshop X7 Pro as an alternative. So far I have taken some photos with my casual digital camera, and looked at the photos in MS Paint. Gets very fuzzy very fast when expanded.

Has anyone had success using Corel Paintshop to make backdrops and what (affordable) camera and lens will work. I am also interested in using the equipment to photograph landscapes, architecture and still lifes. Thanks.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 02/19/2015 6:57:53 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page

Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/19/2015 :  7:38:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob, click on the Search link above and enter photo backdrop and then select search title only.
You'll get at least a dozen threads discussing photo backdrops.
Certainly at least one of them will have some useful info.
I know someone else will be along shortly and provide some new information.


As you think, so will you be.

Country: USA | Posts: 22299 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/19/2015 :  9:57:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The freeware Gnu Image Manipulation Program (known as 'the GIMP') has features similar to Photoshop's. The user interface is different, but if you don't already know Photoshop that doesn't matter as much. There are a lot of tutorials for common tasks.

If your camera can be set to save 'RAW' images, try that. If it can do TIFF or PNG, they're worth trying too. Otherwise, set your camera to save the largest JPEG files it can, set if for 'Landscape' mode if nothing more sophisticated is available, use a tripod and avoid photo management applications that change the size of the file when they put it into your photo folder.



Country: USA | Posts: 5663 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/19/2015 :  11:13:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you both. (I tried searching before posting, but was unable to get the function to work, so had to hunt for a thread.) The search function works now, but did not turn up anything regarding my questions. The information I found previously all related to using photoshop.

Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 02/19/2015 11:21:20 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/20/2015 :  12:10:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
jbvb: I took a look at the camera settings and am going to try again tomorrow with my existing camera using the landscape setting and look at the photo management application settings.

I also looked at a favorable review of GIMP (from 2013) and it sounds impressive. One concern was that GIMP doesn't have raw processing capactity, at least not in 2013. The review mentioned UFRaw was a popular choice. Any advice on that? (I run windows.) Thanks. Bob.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/20/2015 :  08:01:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Searching for 'gimp raw' finds a lot of links. This is a good overview of UFRAW:

http://howtogimp.com/raw-photos-with-gimp/

UFRAW's own page:

http://ufraw.sourceforge.net/

I haven't used any of them because the DigiKam photo archive/editing program I'm using understands my Pentax camera's PEF format. Generally, this class of freeware works pretty well. When it doesn't, there are forums and email lists.



Country: USA | Posts: 5663 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/20/2015 :  09:01:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks!

Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 02/20/2015 :  8:27:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Bob & Crew,

I've been working with GIMP to create backdrop scenes for several months since Forum member Bill Gill introduced me to the program. While I'm still in the test phase, overall, I'm very pleased with the results. Following are some of the test shots:







Keep in mind, the scenes are not photos that I took, rather they are photos that I got online, stitched together and otherwise manipulated to suit my needs. The end result feels like a cross between a photo and hand-painted.

At this point, let me emphasize that I am not a techno person. I've never used Photoshop, but I can generally find my way around photo editing programs. That having been said, here are some observations about GIMP:

1. It's not as intuitive as other programs I've used, but I can get by "playing around" to see what the various functions do.

2. The reason is that the manual is written strictly in "techno-speak." I told Bill that when I tried to use the manual, I felt like a freshman in an MIT grad class. He said not to worry, "Think of GIMP's instructions as trying to follow an 8th grade Arts & Crafts class while the instructor is speaking Urdu and writing in Sanskrit."

3. GIMP has way, way more capabilities than I'll ever use, but those who are knowledgeable about such things might well appreciate them.

4. The absolutest, positively, bestest thing about GIMP is the greatest word in any modeler's vocabulary: FREE!

Anyway, I like the program and the more I experiment with it, the more I like it. Those of you more tech-savvy than I am may not feel the same way.

Catch y'all later.

Steve Flanigan



Country: USA | Posts: 2440 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/21/2015 :  5:01:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Steve. That was very helpful. I am sold on GIMP as the best alternative to start with. I have been taking some more shots with my camera. I set it on "wide" and "landscape," and the resulting photos look okay for distant background. The camera has two problems though. First it is a point and shoot camera fine for taking shots of the family on holidays, but I can't control the focus. Second the tripod attaches on one end of the camera bottom while the push button for taking pictures is on the opposite side. Taking the picture moves the camera body about a 1/4 inch down and back up.

The second problem I can avoid by using a timer to take the pictures, but the first I can't avoid.

I am guessing but it appears to me that it focuses on the nearest object in the frame. So I am literally getting sharp images of rocks and cactus in the foreground. I changed the view so that the nearest objects were 15 yards away instead of 15 feet, and the cactus 15 yards away is in sharp focus. My thought is that I will get a slightly better image of the hills a mile away if I can stop it focusing on fore-ground objects.

Will using a camera without autofocus give me significantly better landscape images?

You may wonder why I am concerned about shooting the photos myself when there are suitable images already available. I only live 4 hours away from the prototype I am modeling, so I could shoot the actual views for my scenes.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 02/21/2015 :  5:49:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glad to be of help, Bob. Unfortunately, I can't help you with your camera problems. Mine is also of the point & shoot variety. I used it for the bottom photo. It does have a macro feature that comes on when I get close to a model, so I get decent depth of field.

I am somewhat envious of your hour drive to shoot your prototype. According to the map program, I am a mere 32 1/2 hours from mine. I live in the So. Cal. desert near Palm Springs and my prototype is in east-central Georgia. Thus the need for online imaging techniques.

Steve



Country: USA | Posts: 2440 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/21/2015 :  10:22:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Some cameras can be set to different autofocus "zone" schemes. If yours has one where the focus zone is a small area in the middle of the frame, try it. Some 'landscape' settings either change the focusing scheme, or just set it to fairly distant (there really isn't much difference between 100' and infinity as far as a camera is concerned). Also, if you can set a higher ISO value (think of it as film speed, if you started long ago) or a slower shutter speed, it will use a smaller aperture and maybe give you more depth of field. But for a limited number of pictures, it might also be worth asking your friends about their cameras, and if you can maybe borrow one for a few days.


Edited by - jbvb on 02/22/2015 09:42:54 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 5663 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/22/2015 :  03:17:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks jbvb! I recently moved and don't know anyone well enough to ask to borrow a camera. Before I decided to build a model railroad, I had already started looking for a camera for doing still life photography and some outdoor nature, architecture and landscape shots. I already have an old Nokia leftover from one of the kid's high school photography class. (A completely manual 35mm film camera.) It still works, but I would rather shoot direct to digital.

That post was really helpful. I looked at the menu and in addition to "landscape" there are "night" (higher ISO) and "night landscape" (says slower shutter speed and implies from "night" a higher ISO) settings. I am going to try out both tomorrow. I didn't see any way to adjust the zone. I did find a "panoramic" function that is good for 3 shots. I will see if I can combine it with the other settings.

I am getting PTS flashbacks of programing my VCR in the 1980s.

And a big thank you. I never bothered to look at the settings before. There are settings for everything from flowers to fireworks and snow to smiles! Even casual shots are going to be more fun now. I will take some more shots from the back yard tomorrow.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 02/22/2015 03:20:37 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 448 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 23 Topic Next Topic: Turnout/Track Compatibility  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.47 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000