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Author Previous Topic: A small expansion to my layout. Topic Next Topic: SL&N construction blog
Page: of 23

Eddie Landreth
Fireman

Posted - 08/23/2003 :  4:24:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's a pic of the layout development of my backdrop. I painted the distant hills in 3 shades of green,
with the lightest used on the most distant, and then gradually darkening as I came forward.
The background is made out of 1/8" masonite.




Edited by - Eddie Landreth on 08/23/2003 4:25:55 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2714 Go to Top of Page

Drew
Fireman



Posted - 08/23/2003 :  6:44:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beautiful job, Eddie!
Just BEAUTIFUL!


-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

Country: USA | Posts: 1173 Go to Top of Page

DryFork
Section Hand

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  08:09:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is the backdrop along the south wall of my layout room before the benchwork was built. Masonite was drywall screwed to the studs, then primed. I then sketched in the basic forms, keeping the horizon above my standing eye level. Since my benchwork is relatively low, this means I have to paint a lot of terrain. But I like the effect of the trains being deep down in the scene.

Blue sky was brush painted on. Clouds are spraypainted on using a technique demonstrated by Bill Henderson on Allen Keller's Coal Belt video. Using photographs I have taken of WVa in autumn as a guide, I painted the landforms and trees with acrylic artist's paints, using sea sponges that I bought at a craft store.

I have a series of in progress shots I could post if anyone is interested.







Country: USA | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/06/2004 :  08:27:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Mark
First welcome to the forum.
That is a very nice backdrop that you have created.
Please feel free to add your progress shots.
One of the reasons I made this thread and a few others a sticky topic was that I thought these would be of interest to most modelers especially those just starting to build a layout (me).
So please add to any of these topics where you have information that would be valuable to others.
Thanks again for your post and I look forward to many more.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13290 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 02/06/2004 :  09:01:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I agree with John. Post those progress photos. You've made a beautiful backdrop and would love to see how you did it. I'm still looking at my walls, which still need a backdrop.

Chuck



Country: | Posts: 6479 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/06/2004 :  09:40:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,
I was happy with my backdrop until I saw yours. A very nice job indeed!



Country: USA | Posts: 30823 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  10:25:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Welcome Mark!!

I agree with the others. Your backdrops are beautiful. I would like to see your progress photos.

Although I model the west, I have 8' of modules modeling Thurmond, WV. I am planning on building 8' more. I would like to see more of your WV backdrop & layout.

Paul



Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/06/2004 :  10:39:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, that's a beautiful backdrop! I'll add my voice to those asking for progress photos and a "how-to."




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

DryFork
Section Hand

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  3:12:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use my backdrop to help place my railroad in a particular location and era. The first steps in creating that kind of backdrop are inspiration and observation. The State of West Virginia is full of inspiration, and I like nothing better than to observe it. Over the years, I have developed a clear idea of what I want my backdrop and scenery to look like. I have taken a lot of photos, but prefer the interpretation and subjectivity of painting. Besides, it is not easy to get wide, unobstructed panoramic views from railroad grade elevation.






Country: USA | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page

paulbrockatsf
Fireman

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  5:49:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,

Your benchwork looks good too. I guess that is for another thread.

Paul



Edited by - paulbrockatsf on 02/07/2004 1:20:47 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 3581 Go to Top of Page

NickO
Fireman

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  8:46:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,
Is that a window being covered over by the loose-looking panel? Funnily enough the subject of how to disguise a window opening has been discussed recently over at Yahoo,with a number of suggestions being put forward.You seem to have overcome the problem very well.
The whole backdrop is one of the most convincing I've seen for a long time.More info would be gratefully received,

NickO



Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 1747 Go to Top of Page

DryFork
Section Hand

Posted - 02/07/2004 :  09:23:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I appreciate all the positive commentts on the backdrop. I will post in progress shots as soon as I get them scanned.

As for the benchwork...there is enough of it visible in the backdrop picture to show you that I am building a sectional layout. The support structure was built around the walls first, then sections of benchwork are added as layout construction progresses. I referred to articles written by Ian Rice and Sam Swanson for techniques and tips.

At this point in the progress of the layout, I am not so sure that sectional construction was such a great idea. It adds quite a bit of complexity to the planning of the layout is ways that I did not anticipate. It can have a pretty serious adverse effect on the reliability of operations. My initial thinking was that by building a sectional layout, I would always be able to work on a section at ideal height and under ideal lighting, with full access. That is true, but all that flexibility comes at a cost.

Initially, I imagined being able to pull a section out of the layout and work on it outside on a sunny day whenever I felt like it. That is not possible. Once my layout had grown to three sections, the middle section "wedged" the two adjoining sections in place, so they were no longer removeable without causing major problems. So, once the carriage bolts are tightened on adjoining sections, they are rarely separated. As to whether the sectional construction will come in handy when I have to move the layout....who knows. Fortunately, I haven't had to do that.




Country: USA | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page

DryFork
Section Hand

Posted - 02/07/2004 :  09:46:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nick,

There are (2) windows covered over in the backdrop. Both are covered by luan panels finished nailed onto the window trim.

When I put the Masonite up for the backdrop, I was thinking I would leave the windows uncovered. As work progressed on painting the backdrop, it became apparent that much of the effect would be lost with the windows breaking into the scenes. I am not too thrilled with the way the luan panel solution came off. If I had to start over, I would have used battens to space the Masonite away from the wall enough to allow running it unbroken across the window openings. Some kind of support every 16 to 24 inches or so would be enough to keep the Masonite flat. across the window.




Country: USA | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/07/2004 :  11:02:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by DryFork


At this point in the progress of the layout, I am not so sure that sectional construction was such a great idea. It adds quite a bit of complexity to the planning of the layout is ways that I did not anticipate. It can have a pretty serious adverse effect on the reliability of operations. My initial thinking was that by building a sectional layout, I would always be able to work on a section at ideal height and under ideal lighting, with full access. That is true, but all that flexibility comes at a cost.

Initially, I imagined being able to pull a section out of the layout and work on it outside on a sunny day whenever I felt like it. That is not possible. Once my layout had grown to three sections, the middle section "wedged" the two adjoining sections in place, so they were no longer removeable without causing major problems. So, once the carriage bolts are tightened on adjoining sections, they are rarely separated. As to whether the sectional construction will come in handy when I have to move the layout....who knows. Fortunately, I haven't had to do that.





Boy, Mark, you just articulated and confirmed all of my worries about buiding modular or sectional benchwork. As some of the "old hands" around here know, I have been saying for the last 18 months or so that my next phase of benchwork was going to be modular. I was not going to build any more benchwork using L girder or open grid. But nagging worries about the nature of modular/sectional benchwork (and general laziness) kept me from going ahead with any new construction.

I know there are a lot of advantages to building benchwork in sections. But once the construction is finished and it's time to start scenery, it seems to me the advantages diminish rapidly. So, it's just been in recent weeks that (in my thinking/planning) I have started to make the transition back to more traditional benchwork.

I really don't need the flexibility of modular or sectional benchwork anyway. I'm not a member of a club or group, and being retired I don't have to worry about job transfers and moves.

Your comments have been very helpful. Thanks.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

DryFork
Section Hand

Posted - 02/07/2004 :  12:14:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike-

I am coming to the conclusion that sectional layout construction is a specialized application. And the magic number seems to be (3). The benefits of sectional layout construction begin to lose the ability to outweigh the extra planning, materials, and work involved once the total number of sections exceeds three. Therefore, I would recommend it for building a layout that can be subdivided into (3) or fewer 2 by 8 foot or smaller section. Any more than that, and you would have to have an overriding reason why the layout must be built in sections.




Country: USA | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page
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