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[ Active Members: 2 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 51 ]  [ Total: 53 ]  [ Newest Member: dtrocket ]
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Author Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine
Page: of 12

Johnr0836
New Hire

Posted - 04/16/2007 :  1:39:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I using 2" pink foam for my layout. Do you do anything special with the seams. All of my seams expect one are two factory cut edges (T&G). What material can be used to fill the imperfections in the non factory cut edge? Is there anything else I should know before I glue the foam down? Thanks.


Country: USA | Posts: 3 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2007 :  9:33:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Johnr0836

I using 2" pink foam for my layout. Do you do anything special with the seams. All of my seams expect one are two factory cut edges (T&G). What material can be used to fill the imperfections in the non factory cut edge? Is there anything else I should know before I glue the foam down? Thanks.



I have used plain old dry wall or joint compound to hide the seams and since it can be sanded you can get things perfectly level.
I am also sure others have used other techniques.

Just make sure you do not use a glue that will react with the foam or it will dissolve it before your eyes.
I use liquid nails for projects (Not the regular liquid nails) and put it on each surface and then spread it with a drywall knife and when it starts to get tacky glue the pieces together and weight it down if possible.
Not sure if you mean one piece on top of another or edge to edge.
For edge to edge which can not be weighted down I do the best I can and them fill any gaps with the drywall compound.

Hope this helps.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2007 :  10:19:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John,

Besides John B's suggestion of joint compound, I have found Lou Sassi's ground goop to work very well. You can find more info on goop at this link: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3885&whichpage=6


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 31813 Go to Top of Page

Tim Kerkhoff
Fireman



Posted - 04/16/2007 :  11:53:57 PM  Show Profile  Send Tim Kerkhoff a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
One thing I have done is to glue a thin strip of foamcore or even thick posterboard on the bottom of a butt joint. It keeps the 2 pieces of stryfoam from moving vertically and horizontally. As far as filling the crack I would use a jonit compound like John recommended.


Country: USA | Posts: 5879 Go to Top of Page

Johnr0836
New Hire

Posted - 04/17/2007 :  6:32:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you use any type of tape on the joints before using the joint compound?

John



Country: USA | Posts: 3 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 04/17/2007 :  6:40:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Johnr0836

Do you use any type of tape on the joints before using the joint compound?

John



I do not use tape.
If the joint were below track and you experience shrinking cracks then add another coat.
However you can get a very close fit with the 2 pieces of foam so the gap should not be that deep.
If the area is below scenery the ground cover will fill in any of the gaps.
As I am one who also uses grout for dirt and after I wet it with a 50/50 mix of glue of some type and water, the area dries rock hard so it will fill in any gaps very nicely.

Also the goop that Bruce mentions fills in all the gaps.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

rsmilley
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/17/2007 :  7:22:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all,
Looking for some feedback/guidance from the group - regarding track suppliers.

All of my experience with track is with Atlas code 83 flex track and their standard #4/6/8 turnouts. But I'm looking for input on alternate track suppliers and a wider variety of turnouts - specifically curved turnouts. What other alternative suppliers are there (ie, shinohara, peco) and what's a good on-line source for "wholesale" pricing ??

As for you folks laying your own track - that's an art I just don't think I'm ready for...

Thanks in advance.
--steve



Country: USA | Posts: 429 Go to Top of Page

Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 09/17/2007 :  9:38:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Steve
This is the second time around me with hand laying track and turnouts. It really isn't that hard and with the Fast Track Turnout Assembly system, you'll be a pro in no time.
Peter



Country: USA | Posts: 12335 Go to Top of Page

Quinn222
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 11/10/2007 :  10:53:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm at the point of laying track and I've been putting it off because I pretty much have no clue what I'm doing. Is there a set procedure for how and where to start? Do I put down the turnouts first and then put the track between them? Do I start at a turnout and work to the next? This is one of those things that's glossed over in all those 'build a model railroad' books. They all assume you're using snap track of some sort and give anything else short shrift.


Country: USA | Posts: 1139 Go to Top of Page

LVRALPH
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2007 :  11:56:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Christina, I have always been advised, and it makes sense to do the turnouts first. Pick you most complicated area of turnouts and crossings and get that installed where they must go. Then, you can extend the track outward from that point. The reasoning is most complicated trackage can only go in one way with little room to fudge. But regular track can be adjusted. I do this with my handliad track, it works for flex too.


Edited by - LVRALPH on 11/10/2007 1:29:57 PM

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Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 11/10/2007 :  1:19:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage  Reply with Quote
John
I used 1 inch pink foam for my sub roadbed and carefully sanded to level each section before gluing down my wood ties. Individual sections are built a the work bench and then added to the layout by gluing the foam down to the homasote. I just use normal scenery techniques over the seams and they disappear forever.
Peter



Country: USA | Posts: 12335 Go to Top of Page

NBandS
Section Hand

Premium Member


Posted - 11/12/2007 :  4:34:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Christina, I concur with Ralph, and that's basically how I did it.

However dept: Several books recommend prefabricating complex bits of trackwork at the workbench. That has undoubted merit, but I would caution against taking it too far--that is, don't try to assemble too much into a single unit. Trying to align two four-foot, multi-turnout chunks of trackwork to each other convinced me that bigger was not necessarily better.

The prefab method worked quite well for simpler things, such as attaching a piece of flex to each route of a turnout.



Country: USA | Posts: 94 Go to Top of Page

bluenose
New Hire

Posted - 11/25/2007 :  10:57:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Homasote does have problems, but you may not notice on a layout. With N scale modules it becomes quite apparent that the module ends swell and need to be sanded down periodically to maintain a level meet with adjacent modules. The effect would also be more critical with the smaller scales.

I have used pink/blue poly sheets for scenery but not for trackwork. Multiple layers have been glued with yellow glue but take at least overnight to dry. Hydrocal rocks have been formed directly on the pink poly with no problem, and it takes acrylic paints with no prep work. I use a zip knife for cutting/carving; this avoids fumes and I don't have to store another seldom used specialty tool. Seams I filled with paintable latex caulk and then applied the scenery.

Lots of great ideas, guys . . this entire site is a veritable gold mine of information and talent!

Charles



Country: USA | Posts: 17 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2007 :  7:25:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This afternoon, I got West Lynn's first hand-laid switch to about 40% complete. Here I'm using Campbell profile ties and Code 100 rail because they match the salvaged Atlas fiber-tie track I'm using for hidden staging. Roadbed is Homasote on 1/2" plywood. The transition to Code 83 will be on the next piece of benchwork to the left. The whole section is presently shifted out so I can stand up (kinda) behind it. Soon I have to figure out how to attach the backdrop just to the left of the Saugus Branch staging tracks.



Edited by - jbvb on 12/31/2007 7:32:21 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6143 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/10/2008 :  09:11:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I finished my switch - heel thrown-points and an old Tenshodo twin-coil machine I bought in H.S.

The points are silver-soldered to 3/32" brass rod. they pivot in 1/8" brass tube, each jumpered to its closure and stock rails. The closure rails are gapped up near the frog. This avoids back-to-back shorts and ensures the points are fed.



The point rods are threaded 3-48, each holding a music-wire arm between two nuts. The plastic block is drilled #50 and tapped 2-56 for screws to hold one arm and the throw rod in place.



Underside



Side view.

This is "built for the ages", labor-intensive but durable; Another section of my layout came from TMRC (MIT) where I learned this technique. It's 35 years old, 10' long and I had to get it down 2 flights of stairs single-handed. All the switches survived w/o damage.



Country: USA | Posts: 6143 Go to Top of Page
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