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Author Previous Topic: Ballast Topic Next Topic: looking for switch machine
Page: of 12

KC@SSM
New Hire

Posted - 06/30/2004 :  5:53:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all everybody that comes in the layout room thinks I am crazy.They say the layout bench work will out last the buiding it is in,they all want to no why I went to this extreme with bench work.I tell them that I have built many layouts in my lifetime and with this one being the so called dream layout that I have always wanted I was concerned with warpage here in NewEngland the humidity really does a number on benchwork.Layout is built on L girder benchwork made from pine and the sub roadbed is three quarter inch plwywood.ALL pieces are glued and either nailed or screwed together.I use midwest cork roadbed for and track work is nailed, I find it less noisey being nailed.There is a de- humidifier running 24/7 in the summer months and the room is fully heated in the winter.My reason for this extreme benchwork is that I dont want to go in there one day and the track work looks like a roller coaster.

KEVIN CARREIRO

Country: USA | Posts: 14 Go to Top of Page

KC@SSM
New Hire

Posted - 06/30/2004 :  6:18:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Here are two pics I will learn how to work this computer one day.Download Attachment: IMG00002.jpg
282.26 KB

Download Attachment: IMG00003.jpg
212.97 KB


KEVIN CARREIRO

Country: USA | Posts: 14 Go to Top of Page

Climax1880
Fireman



Posted - 06/30/2004 :  7:33:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's the way to start out Kevin. Sometimes I think some people forget that the most important facets of this hobby are benchwork and track. That's the purpose for the whole layout. How disappointing it is to some folks to have a beautiful layout and then because they skimped on benchwork or trackwork their trains keep falling off the track. What fun is there in that?

Keep on keepin on.



Country: USA | Posts: 1696 Go to Top of Page

jar
New Hire



Posted - 01/07/2005 :  11:43:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok, here's a stumbler - I think.

I just got back into the hobby after a rather long vacation; now the question -

Layout frame work is 1x4 wood frame on 16" centers, I prefer hand laid track & switches ( HO Scale code 83 rail. Seeing I don't really like the preformed road bed and have been used to using cork but it is hard to find around here - what would you use as a subroadbed & roadbed. I think that I should let you know that Homasote isn't available here even at the newly opened Home Depot.

I was thinking of using 1" foam, then using 1/8" paneling ( just about the same as luan, which also isn't available around here, and then maybe drive 300KM oneway to get some 1/8"cork or would this even be necessary.

Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

JR



Country: Canada | Posts: 31 Go to Top of Page

Bubby
New Hire

Posted - 01/18/2005 :  5:58:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Chessie1973

Has anyone here used the AMI Instand roadbed material?

My Local Train shop is carrying this and he swears by it. No glue required at all to either lay the track or ballast it and you can remove the track and roadbed after if needed without destroying it as well.

It sounds like a good product but I wanted to know if anyone here had used it before and could give an impression.

I am seriously thinking of getting this product and giving it a try if no one has used it to give my impressions of it when I begin my redo of my layout. If it works out I will definitely be stocking up on this product in the future as it seems like it would offer a great shortcut method of laying track and ballasting as well as sidewalks, roads and pretty much any other type of surface you may need in model railroading.


Edit
Somehow I made a booboo, instead of replying with quote I edited this post which I can do as a moderator.
However I had no intention of editing it.
So what is above this statement was posted by
(Bubby),Denny and what is below was supposed to be my reply.
Sorry about this goof.

First welcome to the forum.
I have also heard good things about the AMI roadbed.
I am at the point of actually getting ready to start construction and any information about this product would be of value.
Thanks in advance.
John Bagley



Edited by - Bbags on 01/19/2005 11:50:26 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 1 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/19/2005 :  08:35:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jar

Ok, here's a stumbler - I think.

I just got back into the hobby after a rather long vacation; now the question -

Layout frame work is 1x4 wood frame on 16" centers, I prefer hand laid track & switches ( HO Scale code 83 rail. Seeing I don't really like the preformed road bed and have been used to using cork but it is hard to find around here - what would you use as a subroadbed & roadbed. I think that I should let you know that Homasote isn't available here even at the newly opened Home Depot.

I was thinking of using 1" foam, then using 1/8" paneling ( just about the same as luan, which also isn't available around here, and then maybe drive 300KM oneway to get some 1/8"cork or would this even be necessary.

Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

JR



JR
I was hoping someone who actually had a layout up and running would answer your question.
Mine is only on paper at this point.
By bringing this topic back to Active Topic status maybe someone will be able to give you an answer.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13302 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/19/2005 :  10:21:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
AMI Roadbed is uncured butyl rubber and is very sticky. It works very well, but it can be expensive to use if you're building a large layout.

One of my favorite uses for it in the past was to make asphalt roads/streets from it. I would put a strip of it in place, roll the edges slightly with a soda can to taper them down, and then lightly sprinkle Highball granite ballast over all of it. Then I'd roll the ballast into the rubber with the soda can. It made a really nice looking asphalt or gravel road - depending upon how much ballast I used. I think they now sell "kits" for this as well as colored roadbed. (The original was/is jet black.)




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

speedlimit20
Section Hand



Posted - 01/19/2005 :  6:46:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi there John, Mike and other buddies :

I've recently completed my first On30 module which has both standard gauge and narrow gauge trackage areas separated vertically by about 1-1/4". The trackage is all handlaid so i was pretty concerned about finding the right roadbed to which i could glue the homemade ties and spike down the rails.

I tried two alternatives here. On the standard gauge section, i laid the usual 3mm cork strips down to the foam roadbed and then glued down the ties with standard white glue.

On the upper narrow gauge section i used 5mm thick artists foamcore board as the roadbed over the foam subbase and then glued down the wood ties, again using white glue. I chose the foamcore board for the narrow gauge section, not only because it weighs nothing, but i wanted to cover a larger area for the trackage roadbed than using cork strips would allow.

The foamcore board is available from artists supply stores, etc. and comes in large sheets and is cheap. Easy to cut with a box cutter too.

So which one do i prefer after having used both? Well, both hold down the spikes into my balsawood ties and code 100 rail excellently with absolutely no movement in the gauge and both allow the driving of spikes to their full depth without hitting any hard material that otherwise would make this a real chore. They are both water impervious as far as soaking the areas when gluing down my gravel fines ballast so no concern there either. So i would happily use both / either again. Cheap, lightweight, water resistant.





For what it's worth.




Country: Australia | Posts: 95 Go to Top of Page

sparkman
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/19/2005 :  10:03:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,
That is some excellent trackwork!!!
Are the switches modified Pecos? Also interested in how you did the switchstands.
Again, excellent job!!
-david j



Country: USA | Posts: 471 Go to Top of Page

Jim T
Fireman



Posted - 01/19/2005 :  10:32:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, that is some fine track work all right. Please do elaborate more on the narrow guage switches.........size, etc. I'm starting to design an On30 mini layout and want to handlay the track and build my own switches.

Tnx, Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 1188 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/19/2005 :  11:43:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beautiful job, Rick!

I used foamcore board for roadbed once on a small shelf layout in my office. As you pointed out, it's very easy to work with and relatively inexpensive. I used a box cutter to cut bevels along each edge and create a profile for the ballast. The other thing I liked about it is that it's not as thick as cork roadbed. So it looks more realistic to me because the track doesn't sit as high. Now, on my current layout, I'm thinking about using 1/4" extruded pink insulating foam in the same manner. It's even cheaper than foam core when purchased in a fan-fold bundle.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

speedlimit20
Section Hand



Posted - 01/21/2005 :  09:20:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the compliments, guys. You are all very kind. I gotta tell ya though that this has been the best modelling fun i've had for a very long time since moving up from HOn3 to On30. Starting to get organised now to commence module 2.

The turnouts and throw mechanisms are all scratchbuilt, as are the sliding rail chairs under the stock rails. The turnouts are controlled both mechanically and electrically with the throws that you can see as i like to hand throw all turnouts in a walk-around layout fashion.

The guts of the thing is a mini-sized dpdt electronics toggle switch. It's inserted into a hole cut into the extruded foam subbase and has a brass plate soldered to the top of it that sits transversely across the turnout's long header ties as you can see. This brass plate is pinned down to the header ties with 4 small dressmaker pins that represent boltheads. This also makes the whole mechanism removeable if the need arises for maintenence, which would be never, i guess. The chrome lever of the toggle switch is filed down until i can slip an appropriate sized brass tube over it. This is cut to length depending on the design of the switchstand you are attempting to model (in my case, the 30" gauge Puffing Billy prototype here in Australia) and smaller lenghts of telescoping brass tube are inserted and soldered in place so that they are all solid. The very top of the last 1mm diameter brass tube insert is squashed with pliers to represent the hand grip.

Mechanics: The inbuilt springing of the toggle switch gives the throw to change the route and at the same time holds the point rails tight against the stock rails when thrown from side to side. The white painted throwrod (0.015" brass rod) connects the switch to the point rail spreaders. So that handles the mechanics in as simple and foolproof a manner as i could devise.

Electrics: The dpdt toggle switch also changes the polarity of the power to the frog of the turnout. I'm running DCC so the frog rails are electrically isolated from the remaining turnout rails in the normal manner. I don't like rail joiners and never use them but prefer to just leave electrical gaps where needed and run a drop power cable to each and every piece of rail, no matter how small they might be, to the main power bus under the foam subbase and supported by the aluminium framework that the layout is built from. Trains never, ever stall with this method of wiring because the wheels are always picking up power at all times. And with the frog isolated, i can lay the turnout closure and point rails with something like the narrow prototype throw distances to the stock rails. I think it looks better and operates flawlessly.

So that's about it. And the cost of these dpdt switches is only about $1.50 each.

The photo below might better show the construction. If you give me a day, i'll extract one of the dpdt mechanisms from one of the turnouts and show you what they look like underneath. These are simple to make and only need a soldering iron to put together.








Country: Australia | Posts: 95 Go to Top of Page

speedlimit20
Section Hand



Posted - 01/21/2005 :  11:21:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim T

Yes, that is some fine track work all right. Please do elaborate more on the narrow guage switches.........size, etc. I'm starting to design an On30 mini layout and want to handlay the track and build my own switches.

Tnx, Jim


Hi Jim :

I am posting a PDF file of my Autocad Lt design for the On30 turnouts shown in the photos above, if it's of any use to you. I printed these out and glued them down to the roadbed and then built the turnouts directly on top of them as a guide in placing ties and especially the frog rails. Hope it might be useful to you.

http://homepages.ihug.com.au/~rcw/turnouts/On30-No5-Turnout.PDF

Just make sure that when you print them out to your printer that you set the printer's scaling to 100% (or make sure settings like "fit to page" are turned off) and get the images in the centre of the preview screen prior to printing.



Edited by - speedlimit20 on 01/21/2005 11:26:17 AM

Country: Australia | Posts: 95 Go to Top of Page

Jim T
Fireman



Posted - 01/21/2005 :  11:44:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[/quote]
Hi Jim :

I am posting a PDF file of my Autocad Lt design for the On30 turnouts shown in the photos above, if it's of any use to you. I printed these out and glued them down to the roadbed and then built the turnouts directly on top of them as a guide in placing ties and especially the frog rails. Hope it might be useful to you

[/quote]

Tnxs much for the info, got them printed out. Also the mini turorial on switchstand building. I'll look forward to anymore info you provide. I can see doing some of these for myself.

Jim



Edited by - Jim T on 01/21/2005 11:51:29 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 1188 Go to Top of Page

speedlimit20
Section Hand



Posted - 01/21/2005 :  11:57:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim T



Tnxs much for the info, got them printed out. They look to be about no. 5 size. Also the mini turorial on switchstand building. I'll look forward to anymore info you provide. I can see doing some of these for myself.

Jim



Yes, Jim. The turnouts are #5's. The design gives them a 26" radius through the curved route. Note also that there is a 2 degree kink in the diverging stock rail at the sharp end of the point rails.

When i get a photo or two of one of the switchstands pulled up, it will be quite obvious how they are made. Not much too it other than about 100 hours thinking and testing to come up with this design that works well and is simple.

have fun ...



Country: Australia | Posts: 95 Go to Top of Page
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