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Bbags
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Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2003 :  07:52:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Benchwork:
This sticky will be for discussions on how to construct your benchwork. This will be for all scales. Please feel free to post any construction methods that you have found satisfactory to you
Thanks

John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2003 :  07:58:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The following was posted by Walt (Rusty Stumps) about the construction methods he is using. This is a very strong but lightweight system but does require the use of a table saw and a dado blade for your saw.
Hey folks, the Fall Creek Lumber and Mining Railroad crew has been hard at work and the table framework is starting to come together real well.

You can view a number of photos at: http://www.rustystumps.com/layoutconst.htm

Hope you enjoy them.

Walt

Edit
From Walt
First, if you go to my website be sure to review all the photos on the layout construction. I've noticed a large number of people hitting the first page but the numbers drop off on subsequent pages and they hold a lot more information.

Yes please make sure that you view all of the pages. There are 4 on framework construction and 1 more is a schematic drawing.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Edited by - Bbags on 02/25/2003 4:23:47 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2003 :  08:55:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The following is a page from a web site that I think was posted here at RRL but I am not sure who posted it. This web site explains with pictures the use of a hollow core door with metal studs and PVC legs. It is benchwork for N scale but could probably be modified for HO

http://www.members.cox.net/metric8/Benchwork.htm



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 02/25/2003 :  09:04:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, I'll add a little here on my "I" beam constuction method. First, if you go to my website be sure to review all the photos on the layout construction. I've noticed a large number of people hitting the first page but the numbers drop off on subsequent pages and they hold a lot more information.

If I were to start this project over today I would make some modifications. Instead of using the 1/2" plywood for the web, verticle piece, I would use 1/4" masonite. Understand that when a piece is trapped between the two rails it's strength is increased considerably. The two rails are mainly to keep the web (verticle) from twisting and also help keep it from sagging. As long as the web can be kept verticle and straight it will support a lot of weight. The 1/4" masonite is a lot lighter than the 1/2" plywood which is another contributing reason to use it.

As you couldn't put screws into the edge of the masonite, nor is there sufficient surface to glue it, I would add a slotted tab piece of two pieces of 3/4" plywood glued up. With this style of constuction the "I" beams could be made to any length then just cut to fit. Then the tabs could be added for assembly.

If anyone is seriously interested in this style of construction let me know and I'll make up a sample beam to demonstrate my point.

Walt


Walt

In the Crossroads of America.

Country: USA | Posts: 7913 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/25/2003 :  09:05:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For those of you that may be interested in building modules this web page was posted by Railway Bob. It explains modular construction with pictures. Very informative. Click on next at the bottom of the first page to get to more pages of construction techniques.
http://www.railwaybob.com/Modules/ModuleConstruction/ModConstr01.htm



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

cooldavion
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/25/2003 :  09:54:16 AM  Show Profile  Send cooldavion an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Here is another discussion http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=2813 using Pink or Blue foam.


Country: USA | Posts: 442 Go to Top of Page

railwaybob
Section Hand

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  11:02:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit railwaybob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi John. Thanx for the promo to my website. I've also got instructions for building legs using rigid ABS plastic pipe, how to build "carry-plates" to transport your modules, installing your LocoNet if you use DCC, and tips on installing decoders. In the works are instructions for making wooden legs for your modules which will be up in the next couple of weeks.

Hope you all enjoy.
Have fun. (I am!)


Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybob.com

Country: | Posts: 76 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/26/2003 :  2:12:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi
Here is another web site with benchwork using a different technique.
http://www.webreb.com/HiRail/benchwork.html



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Wallace
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/26/2003 :  8:44:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gentlemen: I urge you, in all instances, to use screws to assemble benchwork, instead of nails. It is much less traumatic to existing plaster and scenery to unscrew a board, and replace benchwork with screws, than to inflct pounding nails into existing work. Scale earthquakes have the same effect on models as real ones do on the prototype.


Country: USA | Posts: 372 Go to Top of Page

Rusty Stumps
Fireman



Posted - 02/26/2003 :  10:45:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wallace

Gentlemen: I urge you, in all instances, to use screws to assemble benchwork, instead of nails. It is much less traumatic to existing plaster and scenery to unscrew a board, and replace benchwork with screws, than to inflct pounding nails into existing work. Scale earthquakes have the same effect on models as real ones do on the prototype.



Wallace, good point and I totally agree. Screws don't cost that much more than nails, especially the drywall ones. That can save you a lot later on if you want to make changes not rebuild which is what might happen if you use nails.


Walt

In the Crossroads of America.

Country: USA | Posts: 7913 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/27/2003 :  09:50:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all
Here is an example of using Cookie Cutter Construction method for your benchwork. This was originally posted by Shamus (Paul) in this forum.

Posted - 08/18/2002 : 05:45:06
Here's a starter, letter (A) shows the cookie cutting done on both the 1/8" plywood and 1/2" insulation board. Letter (B) shows it in place but not raised and letter (C) shows part of it raised ready for the next job.

PaulT




John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Edited by - Bbags on 02/27/2003 10:10:12 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

jwmurrayjr
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/27/2003 :  2:28:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit jwmurrayjr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Here are a few pics showing a method for using 1/2" blue foam in the "cookie-cutter" fashion that is, I think, a bit different. It has worked out very well. It's very strong and rigid due the "box girder" structures. (I just posted links as some of the images need to be resized).

The 1/2" blue foam sub-bed and risers looking north.

http://www.railroad-line.com/UPLOADS/jwmurrayjr/2002_0831_134340AA.JPG

The same area with roadbed and track in place.

http://www.railroad-line.com/UPLOADS/jwmurrayjr/Looking%20North%2012-20-02.JPG

The trestle on the north end.

http://www.railroad-line.com/UPLOADS/jwmurrayjr/DSCF0083.JPG

(Note: Don't use the white foam. It's bad!)


Jim

Country: USA | Posts: 152 Go to Top of Page

Drew
Fireman



Posted - 03/01/2003 :  12:15:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is an idea I tried for portable benchwork on a small (32"x66") N scale table-top style layout that I'm building.
I built a lightweight open-frame "cart", so to speak, for the layout to sit on when in use, & then lifted off for transport. I built it from some pieces of 1x3, & some old L-girders recycled from a previous layout. (I never throw anything away...just ask my wife!)The structure rides on heavy-duty casters, with locking wheels.


Download Attachment: bench1.jpg
55.96 KB

I inverted the L-girders at the top, so they would lock together with some L-girders that I screwed to the bottom of the plywood trainboard.I use a couple of "Quick-Grip" C-clamps to hold the layout in place, while it's sitting on the benchwork.

Download Attachment: bench2.jpg
39.67 KB


Download Attachment: bench3.jpg
56.78 KB


-Drew-

"Life is all the stuff that happened while you were making other plans."

Country: USA | Posts: 1173 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/10/2003 :  4:19:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all
Here is a web site of another model railroad that is undergoing reconstruction to increase it's overall size.
The site belongs to "Bonkyrail" (Michael Haley).
Just click on the link and you can follow the construction that has begun in the new year.
The web site also has many other features including the building of the original layout. There are lots of pictures which are a great help in the explanation of the proceedures used.
As this is a work in progress you will be able to follow the construction of the new layout from benchwork to running trains.

http://www.moctezuma-us.com/bonkyrail/



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/13/2003 :  08:25:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all
The following is a topic on building modules that was found at the Layout Construction Yahoo Group.


I've built over 50 module sections using foam. Here's what works for me:

1) 1"x4" box built to the size desired (my largest are 30"x6')
2) 2" foam inserted into the box structure, level with the top of the wood,
and secured with Liquid Nails.
3) one 1x4 center support under the foam, screwed to the box frame.
4) add legs as desired (mine are all off the shelf 1" PVC components).

I've never had a module fail with this construction method, which I've used
for a 15x28 HO scale home layout and ten (and counting) Ntrak modules, which
travel quite a bit.



Actually, I've found that inserting the foam into the box frame works quite
well to secure the foam, and to protect it. I add a bead of Liquid Nails to
the sides of the frame before I add the foam. Adding the foam smears the
bead and does a good job in gluing it into place. I also glue the center
support, wide end to the foam, to help support the foam. The center support
is screwed to the frame.

I agree that using plywood ripped into dimensional lumber will be better
than using stick lumber for the frames.

I've experimented with several leg options, few of which have been really
satisfactory. The simplest method is to just screw 2x2's into the corners
below the foam, but these aren't removable. I tried 1" PVC legs in sockets
screwed to the corners, but this method wasn't really stable. Finally, I
came up with something that works well, and which I'm in the process of
retrofitting to all my Ntrak modules (and some friends modules as well). I
screw 1x4 gussets to the bottom of the box frames at the corners, and attach
a 1" diameter floor flange to the gusset. My new legs are 1" PVC with a
male adapter on one end, and a plug on the other. The male adapter screws
into the floor flange, and is quite stable. I drill and tap the plug for a
large carriage bolt, which gives me leveling capability. The only down side
to this method is the weight: the four cast iron floor flanges weigh as much
as the rest of the module! On the positive side, adding legs to my Ntrak
modules is a matter of a couple of seconds.

Edit:
I think the method that Rusty (Walt) demonstrates on his leg construction would be lighter.


Yes, adding the foam inside the frame eliminates the need for other wood
supports for the foam. Keeping the frame square during construction is the
hardest part of the module building process!

I've been having good luck with double sided carpet tape for laying track
recently. The jury's still out, but I think it works well. Gasket tape is
basically 3M foam tape, which is available at any hardware store. If the
carpet tape doesn't hold long term, I'll switch to 3M aircraft tape, which
is more expensive, but will NEVER come loose! (did anyone know that many
parts in modern aircraft construction are TAPED together?!?). One trick
I've found with the double sided tape is that it also holds ballast. I've
been ballasting as soon as I lay track, and have basically cut out the mess
of gluing ballast! It also gives you the most in-scale ballasting job in N
scale I've ever seen!

I'm glad all this has been of some use to you! Have fun building!

RAY





John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13315 Go to Top of Page

railwaybob
Section Hand

Posted - 03/13/2003 :  10:04:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit railwaybob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
If you completely paint the wooden box frame before you install the styrofoam, you will reduce the chances of warping with stick lumber (1"x 4", 1"x 5", 1"x 6" knotty pine dimensional lumber) to zero.

If you're installing jacks for your throttles in the sides of the module frame (eg DCC RJ12 telco jacks, etc), you might want to go to 1"x 5" or 1"x 6" as a 1"x 4" doesn't provide the same span support as larger dimensions when you cut the holes for the jacks.

For details on the methods that Ray explains, visit my website, click on DCC, then click on Modules.

Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybobcom


Visit "Railways of Eastern Ontario" at
http://www.railwaybob.com

Edited by - railwaybob on 01/05/2004 2:24:05 PM

Country: | Posts: 76 Go to Top of Page
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