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Author Previous Topic: Promised Update... Topic Next Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy
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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/22/2015 :  02:07:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Håkan, Thank You. I was thinking along similar lines with commercial building on the "green" hill. Then I remembered Coquile's elevated main street. It was built on piles about 30 above the ground to accommodate high water on the Coquile River. It was about 300 feet long and the railroad ran down the center of it. I always though it deserved modeling but didn't think I had room for it. This might be a good place for a shorter version. I'll have to test this out with some mock ups.

It's only make-believe

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CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/22/2015 :  10:15:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another possibility is that you have a low head dam, to hold water back to form the pond, and the dam is at the edge of the layout, so it disappears because it falls over the dam.

Just a thought.

BTW: Grandma's house as you described it, sounds like a great candidate for kit bashing. IE, you keep the features of the kit you like, like the roof, and either eliminate, or modify those you don't, like the bay windows. As to the garage, you could build it as a shed, or even a chicken coop. Instead of the garage door, you install an open frame with wire mesh to simulate the chicken wire. If the material of the building itself is wood, that is even better, as it allows you more flexibility to modify. Just remember that foxes would have been a concern, so the lower part of every wall would be solid, and meeting a sold wooden floor. Otherwise the fox could dig it's way in for a free chicken dinner.

Horse




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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/22/2015 :  1:31:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Horse, Those are two good ideas Horse, Thank you.
Really good ideas. On Grand'ma's House I was thinking along those lines. De-caping her and using her roof on a new structure and then I started reviewing pictures of Victorian cottages and got a whole lot of new ideas to shake in the jar...so we'll see.

Now getting back to river hiding; I'm leaning towards something like this;



What do guys think? Does it Work?

The Yellow building is One of my first Campbell's build. Suzanna's Flock.
I still like this building's design and I wonder if I can save it. Most of the bad build errors are on the back side. A new staircase up the side would help. And a better Victorian paint style would help. Maybe a pink or a brighter red for the base color since she deals in Damper Woman's fashions. I'm open to ideas here too.



It's only make-believe

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/22/2015 :  1:52:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A better mock up and shot to JUDGE by;




It's only make-believe

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/22/2015 :  1:53:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yellow base is fine, you need brighter trim! A boxcar red/red ochre would be a good contrast color, and for a 3rd color, consider a medium or dark gray.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/22/2015 :  5:09:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob;

So basically you camouflage the disappearance of the creek by hiding it behind structures. Interesting possibility.

My question is, how deep is the creek in the bed, IE does it overflow the banks regularly? Keep in mind that in spring, with the thaw, many otherwise mild rivulets became raging torrents. Thunderstorms up in the mountains can become severe damaging floods downstream. IE, is your quiet burg in the path of a potential natural disaster? These might seem like irrelevant questions for a model RR, but our models are ostensibly based on reality, and the placement of buildings, and municipalities was in many respects determined by such factors, so while they are not a matter of survival, they are a matter for realistic modeling.

One possibility, is to build flood retention walls along the town side of the creek, IE drive poles into the bank, then build a retaining wall on the water side of the poles, using the pressure of the water to hold the planks in place under the pressure of any flooding.

Some more thoughts.

Horse




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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/22/2015 :  6:48:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Horse,
Very true, specially in western Oregon. That is why Coquile which sits on the river of the same name placed some of their main street on 60' piles. The river raises that much each spring. That is where I got the idea for this business district. This part of Coos Bay doesn't drain as large of a area as the Coquile and the bay offers less resistance to the spring waters than the mouth of the Coquile. But still high water can be a problem. My prototype's docks were about 15' above high tide and I have seen pictures of the depot,docks and yard under a foot or so of water. Most of Marshfield was higher than this but the town forced the Manufacturing business (not just the lumber mills) down to the bay were they were built on piles about as high as I'm planning here. when it is done you will also see planning for high water in the Flour Mill's location as back water stopped the wheel from turning.


It's only make-believe

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2015 :  12:56:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
From my personal collection (as in bought from Jack's Photo Service with full rights to Distribution);
The Rail Roads approach to main street
CoquilLe, Or.

The other end after the Railroad was removes from the street but it shows how high they built along the river. And look at all the details in this shot. like the ramp that starts out of view to the eight and goes under the tracks to the dock on the left.;

One day I'll like to know what that building on the right did. One small smoke stack, a water tank and what look like coal bins on the side.

Ah, one more, rolling down main street;





It's only make-believe

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/23/2015 :  1:01:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Could that "building on the right" be a cannery?

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/23/2015 :  1:06:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob;

Do you know what year the picture with the interesting building was taken?

Several possibilities come to mind. A laundry, steam heat generation, electric generation, a steam driven machine shop, leather tannery, heck the possibilities are staggering!

Great pics by the way!

Horse




Edited by - CavalryTrooper25 on 06/23/2015 1:07:21 PM

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2015 :  2:14:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, Maybe...for fruit. But it's too far from the coast for fish. There were lots of those in Brandon.

Horse, The first and third were in the 1890's when the railroad was new. The middle shot was about 1910.
There are no electric line in the picture. However the town did have electric service in the early 1910's.
The laundry is a good possibility. The Stanborn Maps show a steam laundry in town and by the tracks but the location doesn't seem to match the picture.
I agree there are many possibles. I also lean towards a brewery but think they would have a bigger smoke stack.


It's only make-believe

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/23/2015 :  2:44:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

Dave, Maybe...for fruit. But it's too far from the coast for fish. There were lots of those in Brandon.
...

I'd "accept" fruit, particularly fruit that was packaged into jars (like home canning). That would need water for both fruit processing and for the boiling/sterilizing process, along with coal to heat the water.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7169 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/23/2015 :  5:15:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob;

It is possible that the electric wires went out from the side, or end of the building we can't see, but laundry seems a better possibility.

The building is tall enough for a Brewery, but based solely on the picture it could only have two medium sized vats at most. With only two vats, they would not need a large boiler, so I think that chimney would suffice.

There is a micro brewery here in my town (which BTW is in PA, not MA, it was my maternal grandparents who lived in Mass). It was built in a repurposed tobacco warehouse (a major industry in this area until liberalism decided that tobacco was evil). Anyway, they tore out part of the first, and second floors, to allow the brewing vats to extend from what had been the basement all the way up to what had been the attic, so almost three stories tall. They have five vats going, and can produce a little over 1000 gals of finished beer a week. I took the tour several years ago (Oh, and the beer is AWESOME), and if IIRC they tap each vat every other week, or so, depending on what they are brewing (flavor wise). One week they tap three, the next only two. They have twelve hours to bottle everything from that vat, or it spoils. They use no preservatives, which is the way it would have been in the late 19th/early 20th century, especially out west.

I think if you wanted to do a Brewery, that would be supper cool. Just remember, that after they cook it down, and draw off the soots, that grain based residue was dried, and sold for livestock feed, so having drying racks in an open shed nearby, with a heavily used wheelbarrow track from the brew house to the drying shed would be a very nice, realistic touch.

Funny, I can't explain why I remember all these details from the various things I see, I just do.

Horse




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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2015 :  5:17:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well I went back and reviewed my research on Coguille to see if I could get some ideas for my elevated Main St. Which I did, but,I also found that the tracks were moved from Front (not Main) Street latter than I had recalled. The first and 3rd pictures could of been taken as late 1907. Further, when I looked at my Stanborn maps again and tried to locate that building not from the Railroad Tracks but from the steamer dock to the left I found Coquille Steam Laundry. that would make an interesting addition to my street. It's been a good day of accomplishment with some help from friends.

Dave, in 1907 Coos County was ranked 3rd in apple production.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4726 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2015 :  6:08:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Horse, I guess our posting crossed in Hyperspace. I will do a brewery someplace and even a cigar store both products were consumed heavily. I have a drawing of an Oregon brewery that cold fit as it was built down a hill side. And interesting enough The Marshfield Cold storage and Ice company had a brewery 1906. it too was built a piles over the bay.
The Sanborn Maps said the laundry had electric lights.


It's only make-believe

Edited by - railman28 on 06/23/2015 6:12:42 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 4726 Go to Top of Page
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