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Author Topic Next Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR
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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/22/2015 :  4:51:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think Frank is on to something. The color is good, but the shapes are still little dabs, Maybe if they were a bit more elongated as they get toward the horizon?

Here is a very rough approximation - but, good heavens! (pun intended) don't use this as a guide!! Use real photos of the kind of clouds on the kind of day you want as your guide.




Country: USA | Posts: 2288 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/23/2015 :  01:01:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bill, The little puffs were suppose to suggest distance. But I see the difference now. Let me study these before after a bit.
Thank you again this should be very helpful.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/23/2015 :  08:10:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Many types of cloud have relatively flat bottoms - I don't know if it's our perspective, looking up, or an atmospheric effect where below a certain level the water vapor won't condense.


Country: USA | Posts: 5625 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/23/2015 :  08:24:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, Ok, littler puffs = more distant, that's good. Maybe if the littler puffs were also closer to the horizon than the bigger puffs they'd look farther away. It isn't always like that in the prototype sky, but sometimes the eye/brain need a bit of help to recreate the effect we're after in a flat 2D illustration.

Here's your original clouds with some of the smaller ones moved lower, and, OK, a couple were just stretched a tiny bit again. They also would become less distinct and a little duller (more surrounding sky color mixed into the cloud colors) farther away because there is more air between them and the viewer which artists call, very appropriately in this case, "atmospheric perpspective".

It's all "background" that you're creating, but maybe think of it in zones with a foreground: biggest, highest, most color, puffiest; middle zone: a little smaller, a little more of the surrounding sky color added to the cloud colors, a little lower, lttle more horizontal on their bottom; background: smallest, lowest, least distinct.

One more clue for more depth for the eye/brain even though it doesn't always actually look this way out the window: if any of your clouds do happen to overlap where one zone meets another, the closer, higher ones overlap on top of the lower, farther away clouds, but not the more distant clouds in front of the nearer ones.

Your original again



Yours slightly rearranged and some distant clouds toned down very slightly.



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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/23/2015 :  10:16:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill you're on to something, nice explanation.

Painting clouds is a no-brainer for guys like Troels and Arizona Dave, itís their livelihood. But painting clouds are way out of my comfort zone and area of expertise.

So when my time comes, oh not that TIME, I mean clouds, Iím going to take a picture of the clouds I like and try to replicate the picture. I really think what Martin said is the best way for us novices. COPY rather than create.



Edited by - Frank Palmer on 04/23/2015 10:17:55 AM

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/23/2015 :  2:04:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill, Frank thank you so much for your help. I really do appreciate it even if the fruition of it is slow to develop. I have learned that
  • 1. layering really helps to define the clouds
  • 2. It a lot harder to erase just one cloud on the back drop then it is in Photoshop
  • 3. to really appreciate more the skill employed by Troels and Dave


Here's today efforts, the same scene as before;

I think it's looking better. I mush mention that I started in this are because when the scenery is finished the area will look a lot like this shot of Scott Robertson's layout


And the rest of today's extension;


Please keep the comments coming they're encouraging and helpful



It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/23/2015 :  2:11:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
oh! The roofers are done. I cleaned up after them this morning so there is one less thing getting in the way of the trains.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/24/2015 :  1:30:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's today's cloud report. I hope there is evidence of my efforts to apply all the wonderful guidance I have been given. This area will be between trees and very visible;

I think I need to join the two clouds in the center into one long cloud? But the layering is working as is adding a drop of pink to the white. It gives the shadows that purple haze.



It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 04/24/2015 :  3:04:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I started a new thread under Model Railroad Construction for posting photos of clouds,
real or modeled, to serve as a "Cloud Bank" for anyone looking for ideas or reference for
backdrops. If it gets enough deposits, maybe it will become a sticky near the Backdrops
thread for easy referal.



Country: USA | Posts: 2288 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/25/2015 :  01:14:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill and whoever else is reading this; Painting clouds is like painting (or modeling) a tree. With work and practice we can produce a very fine caricature of ether but not to the level of a photograph. Look at our brothers who do fine arts on YouTube. Or even the Rembrandts and Da Vincis that are displayed in our museums and you'll find very fine caricatures of tress and clouds but even they don't approach photo quality representation. I am no Da Vinci, maybe I could be a Picasso but I think I can make a decent caricature of a cloud. Someday that is. But I will keep trying and beside the bias co-inhabitants of this residence think they are pretty good looking clouds already and that my standards are too high, but that can't be true.

It's only make-believe

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/26/2015 :  09:29:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob,
I think your clouds are looking pretty good. You mentioned going over some of the ones you have done, joining smaller ones to make larger ones. I think it is good to resist the temptation to keep going over areas you have done. Instead you might want to continue with your cloud-making in new areas using the lessons you have learned like making them smaller towards the horizon but crowding them together, and making your clouds larger as you rise above the horizon, perhaps larger than you have been making. Etc. etc. as you look across a sky the cloud formations can be quite diverse, which means you don't want to be overly uniform in painting your sky.

Bill Gill has posted some excellent photos in his "cloud bank", a clever play on words.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/26/2015 :  10:08:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob, I'm sure your practicing more and more to get the clouds just right. When you do you're not going to pull that Van Gogh stunt are you?






Country: USA | Posts: 4719 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/26/2015 :  10:53:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
LOL but, No, No, Frank, No self surgery here, unless you count splinter removal. But while I don't want my backdrop looking like "Starry Night" I do want my trees to look as deep as his do.

Mike Thank you. At this point I'm just going back to add depth to the clouds, that is more bellowing effects and minor adjustments to break up uniformity. But to hear from other modelers that they look good is "gas in the tank of my hot rod".

Thank you both, please keep dropping by.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 04/26/2015 :  5:02:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob, why not try something like this painting. They seem simple enough and still have some depth tp them.






Country: USA | Posts: 4719 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 04/26/2015 :  8:13:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Frank, how about, because it's way over my head!!! At least for now. It's a beautiful SEA SCAPE with the sky and the sea being the star but my trains are the address are the stars.I am going to play around to see if I if I can paint gray clouds. Then we'll see


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