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Author Topic Next Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR
Page: of 93

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2013 :  05:35:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks great Bob! I'm happy to see you back at the workbench (and benchwork)

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/27/2013 :  6:33:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Håkan. Your comments are much appreciated.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/27/2013 :  6:48:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like what I see there too Bob, good old handlaid track!


Country: USA | Posts: 2887 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/28/2013 :  10:37:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Carl. I'm really liking the look of hand laid track too. This trestle runs to a switch that will serve my Flour Mill. I was going to just run flex track from the turnout to the mill but now that I have seen how much better the hand laid track looks (my own and the section you laid on your Wharf build)it will be hand laid.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Salty4568
New Hire

Posted - 12/28/2013 :  1:31:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by railman28

Thanks Carl. I'm really liking the look of hand laid track too. This trestle runs to a switch that will serve my Flour Mill. .......



Hi, Bob. Looks good. Did you ever get the turnout throw problem solved for those stub switches?

Skip


Skip Luke
Retired Railroader

Country: | Posts: 11 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/28/2013 :  8:26:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Salty4568

quote:
Originally posted by railman28

Thanks Carl. I'm really liking the look of hand laid track too. This trestle runs to a switch that will serve my Flour Mill. .......



Hi, Bob. Looks good. Did you ever get the turnout throw problem solved for those stub switches?

Skip




Not yet Skip. I hope to work a bit on that this weekend (Monday-Tuesday for me).


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Ross74H
Engine Wiper

Posted - 12/29/2013 :  09:43:36 AM  Show Profile  Click to see Ross74H's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Wow thats some skill you have there, I wouldn't even attempt to hand-lay track myself, I'd be terrified of doing it wrong!


Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 153 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 02/14/2014 :  7:37:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
THE MILL At Mill Slough.


Back in 49 a young farmer by the name of Oliver Evans decided to go west and pick up some of that gold that was just lying around waiting to be claimed. Well he found a little, OK, a bit more than a little, but he also discovered that being an Argonaut was tougher work than farming or the other trade he had dabbled in, Grain Milling. He decided to pick up his stakes and check out that other promise land, Oregon. To say Oregon one meant the Willamette Valley and boarding a Pacific Steamer he headed for Oregon City looking forward to another great adventure. At this point the cold hand of faith decided to intervene in the plans of those mortals and gave them an unwanted adventure. The steamer hit a sand barge off the mouth of Coos Bay. As this was a too frequent happening the citizens of Empire and Marshfield had established "volunteer" Life Guard posts. These brave lads succeeded in rescuing all souls aboard (even the crew cat!)and much of the cargo too (which they gladly accepted 10% of as their reward). But, here sat Mr. Evens with a mountain range between him and his planed destination. He soon learned that a stage ran regularly to the valley and would be leaving in a couple of days. This gave him time to check the going rates of farms in the Willamette Valley. And No, they weren't exactly giving the land away. In fact you could say it was a sellers markets because of all the disenchanted Argonauts wanting to start over. None the less, he boarded the stage and headed to Oregon City Via Roseburg and a place called the Coquille Valley. Taking the Toll road south out of Marshfield there was a short climb before the road descended into a board fertile valley that was bisected by a good size river he latter learned was the Coquille. He decided to rest from his journey here and check out the local possibilities. De-staging at a place call Myrtle after the trees found there. The unused portion of his ticket is still displayed on the wall of his Mill's office for he liked what he found. He established a farm and soon a small mill to grind it's wheat. As nothing good remains a secret the valley population boomed. By the 1850's Evans and his neighbors needed a "real" mill. Having some limited experience in the art Evans started surveying possible mill cites deciding on a location about a half mile south of Marshfield. The location had a stream of sufficient volume and fall to power a mill year round (and then some as events would later show). So ordering some "works" from the east he started the work on the framing of the mill so that the next year (1856) when the machinery arrived he had it all "Jacked" and ready to mill that years harvest. It was a Two stone mill. He doubted that he would ever run it to capacity as the transportation available limited his distribution to local needs. Most of the Valley's wheat was shipped out to Portland for milling and consumption. But Mr. Evens was making a comfortable living. He built his growing family a nice cottage and gave his neighbors a building to serve as a school and church. Then came the railroad in 67 and his Mill had a vast market along the west coast. From San Diego to Alaska communities that could not support wheat farms needed flour for their daily bread. At this point Mr. Evans decided to expanded. The Mill gained two more runs of stones allowing the adoption of the "New Process Milling" and to have a run dedicated to the minority grains being grown in the Coquille Valley. The new machinery took all the space in the old mill requiring the building of a new "Rodent Prof" grain warehouse. Fortunately Evens had chosen his site well and the site had suffice power to drive the new machinery. And while the area suffers frequent flooding the mill has never been in danger.

The Modeling.
I'm modifying an Campbells Boat House into my mill. I shortened the building, narrowed the doors (added two side doors) modified the window casing by removing the overhang on the top board. I added considerable bracing to the walls. after using AI on all wood I tried the Mineral solvent/craft paint method for pealing paint. the grain warehouse will be scratch build. I'm using a Bollinger 22' water wheel kit and the mill will go on a stone foundation From New England Brownstone. The above picture gives you an idea of the finish scene. The mill will stand about 3/8" higher. Across the foreground there will be a continuance of trestle.

The mill, the pioneer is named after Oliver Evans the Great American inventor and mill wright. The Edison of his day.

Comments?


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/14/2014 :  7:53:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Comments? Sure ... it's nice to see the reconstruction taking shape!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/14/2014 :  8:28:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don't forget the 'yard-arm' above the doors with a block and tackle, for hauling new millstones and barrels to the upper stories. What are you planning for a roof?

dave



Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7094 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2014 :  02:15:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Dallas.

Dave, The mill will have a tin roof like I put on my shop but it will be unpainted, oxided and a little rusted. The new grain warehouse will have a new material. One that the railroad introduced into the area. They used it on their new freight house on the bay and were nice enough to connect us with its MFG, the Central Pacific Railroad. They call it coragated iron.


It's only make-believe

Edited by - railman28 on 02/15/2014 02:17:39 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2014 :  2:46:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great story Bob! When I first read it I first thought is was a real life story not fiction. Or is there some truth in it apart from the Evans name?

Nevertheless a great read.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2014 :  5:56:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by masonamerican

Great story Bob! When I first read it I first thought is was a real life story not fiction. Or is there some truth in it apart from the Evans name?

Nevertheless a great read.

Håkan



Thanks for the high compliment Håkan. The story is the combination of several of the Coos County pioneers. All the elements are true, the ship wrecks , the life guard volunteers (though I don't know if they received a gift)the arrival with other plan, all were the experiences of the early settlers.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 02/16/2014 :  6:05:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Mill work continues. I added internal bracing.
Michael's (I went in for craft paint) got a Balsa wood shipment in so I stocked up on 1/8 sq. for bracing and put it to good use adding bracing to the mill. Campbell gives you some nicely scribed wood to use as flooring in the building. As this Mill will have no interior detailing I have better use for the wood. So I substituted cardboard and the 1/8 sq. balsa. As can be seen from the pictures I crossed the supports 90 deg. and I also added a beam across the top of each side wall to keep them straight. I also detailed the doors with cross bracing and hinge supports. Note that the bottom story side door (with the X pattern) does not have the hinge supports. This door lifts upright into the mill. This door is the main shipping door for the flour since the mill was modified after the railroad arrived. Before that the front door was used. Now the front doors are only used for ventilation of the addition or removal of machinery.

The pictures;

From the Top:

From the bottom;

and an overview;



At this point I will add the door hinge hardware after weathering it. But next I will work on the Water Wheel and the Grain Warehouse.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/17/2014 :  01:41:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your mill looks nice, Bob. I'm looking forward to see how you add the water wheel.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page
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