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Author Previous Topic: Promised Update... Topic Next Topic: Early Railroad Equipment into the 50s
Page: of 87

lenelg
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/01/2015 :  03:30:36 AM  Show Profile  Visit lenelg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Sorry for commenting late, but I have been away on holiday. The "strange looging smokestack" on the Baldwin import (photo posted July 20) is the first stage in adapting the loco to Swedish practice. It is a "turbine spark arrester" which was widely used on Swedish steam engines in the late 19th Century. A set of vanes in the "donut" shape around the base of the chimney would set the exhaust spinning in a vortex,and throw cinders against the outside wall where they would lose momentum and fall down a funnel into the smokebox.

Lennart Elg - the Sloat Lumber Man

Country: Sweden | Posts: 126 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 09/02/2015 :  8:59:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you for the explanation Lennart. The sight of that smokestack seems quite exotic to me compared the normal American stacks. Would be interesting to know how effective it is compared to the American counterpart.

I have always had a soft spot for American and English exports in colonial countries with their adaption to suit the countrys needs and standards. The American imports to Australia springs to mind. I'm reading a book "American steam on australian rails" which is quite interesting with how fierce the competition was in the early years between the advocates for British steam on one side and American steam on the other. When one reads the book one of the main reasons to chose American was faster delivery. The English orders averaged 1,5-2 years compared to Americans (Baldwins) which was about 6-12 months. Also the followers of the American steam thought them more flexible in their constructions and better suited to the rougher conditions in Australia.

I have started on the dam gate. I have made it in quite substantial timber to cope with the logs and debris. On the top I'll incorporate a walkway for the workers to access the gate and to be able to move to the other side.



Let me know what you think. I have worked from pictures on the internet and what I seemed plausible.

Håkan




Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/03/2015 :  12:00:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks good to me. Åre you going to set her square òr at a angle?

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4563 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/03/2015 :  11:49:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Håkan;

What you have looks great!

If you are concerned about pressure against the retaining walls, you can double the walls up, with a sand, or fill, filled gap between the two walls, and an angled sluice on the exit side. This would make the retaining walls much stronger, as well as giving the crosswalk a more stable support structure.

I will try to draw up what I am talking about, and post the pic shortly.

Horse




Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 09/04/2015 :  3:38:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bob, it will sit square.

Thanks, that would be great Horse. I'm thinking on supporting the walls with fill together with the 10x10 in front of the wall. But I'm open to new ideas.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 09/05/2015 :  7:02:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Guys, here is how it looks at the moment. I added a second wall which is hidden by the walkway. I'm thinking on filling in in front of the wall with rock and gravel sloping to the middle where the stream then enters the culvert.

The retaining walls in the pond is not final but only placed there to see how it looks.





Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/05/2015 :  9:12:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks good Håkan. Is the water high enough?
I like the size of the mill pond too. It's not to small in comparison to the mill


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4563 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 09/06/2015 :  5:11:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bob. The gate opening is at the correct height for the water level. The water level sits quite low compared to the rails with about 4-5 scale feet. I could have had it higher but the mainline beside would then look as it is at the risk of flooding.

Håkan




Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/07/2015 :  3:46:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry for the delay, but here is a rough sketch of what I was thinking.



In this particular drawing, I show the natural stream course flowing past, with an inlet gate to take water from said stream only when wanted in the mill pond. If you do not have, or want that, then you need to provide an overflow for the pond during periods of flooding, as your outlet gate will likely, not be enough to handle full release of the pond in the event of flooding. This is partly why I have the mill pond purely in an "on demand" status for water, thereby you avoid having to worry about overflow from the stream when it runs high.

The pond water level can be adjusted as needed, and emptied, or mostly emptied when the mill is shut down, or not needed. At the outlet end, you want the first retaining wall to act as a break, to protect the outlet gate, and to hold a grate of some sort to trap, and retain debris, to further protect the gate. The gate is then several feet down a ditch, with a double retaining wall, to allow the walkway for adjustment of the gate opening. You may also want to line the ditch with a retaining type wall to reduce erosion, that could otherwise undermine the primary walls, and gate mechanism. On the outlet side of the outlet gate, you want to install directional walls, or rock piles to prevent swirling eddies at the outlet wall face, that will promote erosion that will undermine the outlet wall.

See, I did pay attention in the Combat Engineering extension course.

Horse




Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2015 :  2:59:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25



See, I did pay attention in the Combat Engineering extension course.

Horse





You certainly did! Thank you for the sketch and information Horse. I don't have all the features in your sketch and description so I have to ponder what I can use.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/09/2015 :  10:57:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Part of being a senior NCO was learning aspects of all the MOS's that related to my own.

I liked the part where we got to blow stuff up the best!!

Horse




Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/10/2015 :  01:29:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice work on this sawmill and its surroundings, Håkan.


Country: France | Posts: 17643 Go to Top of Page

milocomarty
Fireman



Posted - 09/10/2015 :  1:22:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit milocomarty's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Naizzzz

http://martinwelberg.wordpress.com/
http://cardiganbaycoastalrailroad.wordpress.com/

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 6667 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/10/2015 :  1:59:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like it! I really like it great job.

Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10426 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/12/2015 :  10:12:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Håkan;

Here is an E-Bay item you may wish to consider incorporating into your mill scene, E-Bay item # 331645624771

Gotta get the logs in the water somehow.

Horse



Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page
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