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Author Previous Topic: Promised Update... Topic Next Topic: Early Railroad Equipment into the 50s
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masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2015 :  10:34:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Horse! Its quite stagnant. There you have it, I was thinking of a quite clear deep mountain pond/lake and it hadn't occurred to me that the logs could affect it. Feels more like black in the deeper areas together with brown in the shallow areas should work for the color.


Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/13/2015 :  10:40:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There would be a lot of pieces of bark floating around in the water, too.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6983 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2015 :  11:08:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My lofty vision (see picture below) is long gone




and is now replaced by this




Thanks for the brutal tips Guys!

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2015 :  11:31:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Håkan,
With what that kit gives you, you've done an excellent job with it. The coloring and construction is extremely pleasing to the eye.
With the rock cliff behind it and that wonderful bridge in fount of it, it is going to be a highly praised scene. And I do like the layout of the scene. As you know, the mill is just a caricature. Too extreme in my view. To yourself be true, of course. It is a very fine place holder until you can build a better one. And given the location and the difficulty in viewing, it could be a 'back burner" project. I would suggest one of FSM sawmill kits. You would have to mirror ether of their designs to fit this space. And please, contact me at that time so I can tell you what is inaccurate in those kits before you start the build.

On the Mill pond; I would raise the water level tell it was about 1/4 inch below the roadbed. Horse is quite right, they were greenish, dirty, dark--think thinned mud. I don't have enough experience with water to advise you on what to do there so will be watching to see what you can teach me there. Ask Troels, his water is the best I've seen.

I hope I haven't been overly critical. If so, I'm sorry. Like the doctor who killed the patient said, "I was only trying to help". I do consider you a great (certainly better than me) modeler and learn much from you.

Please show us and tell us about the bridge in the foreground.




It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4563 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2015 :  5:47:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bob both for the kind words and the criticism. On the kit I was shifting between the Keystone Danby and the KMP mill. Looking in the rear view mirror the setup on the Danby of the carriage etc. is strange and I would perhaps have been better of with the KMP. Still I was of the impression that the Danby was modeled after a real mill although small.

I'll ponder what to do but I think there is space to make the alterations like in the sketch you sent me. I'll finish the scenery around it before I decide what action to take. One way is to leave it as it is and go back later but I think the best is to fix it right away even if it hurts a little.

The bridge is similar to the other one I made previously. It is truss deck bridge made from a Black Bear kit. Both are on a curve but I have widened the bridges a little to accompany the track.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/14/2015 :  9:13:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by masonamerican

My lofty vision (see picture below) is long gone






Thanks for the brutal tips Guys!

Håkan




Håkan

The second pond is much more like what you would want, but you would very likely have mud plumes, where the logs falling in stirred up mud from the bottom, while the larger stagnant areas would be the very dark brown to black, while the edges along the shore would have the lighter browns, and almost a rusty appearance in places, as can be seen in the photo. Dave is correct, you would also have chunks of bark, and even chunks off the logs floating, mostly along the edges, and you could even have cast off sawdust on the pond from the spinning of the blade, and blown in from under the saw table, where it might be fairly thick if not cleaned out regularly.

Horse




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masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 07/15/2015 :  02:51:50 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the input Horse, I was only joking a little with the pictures. I'll see what I come up with, To try simulate the pollution and debris can be difficult and can in the end look quite strange so I think I stay on the safe side. It will take some experimenting.

Thanks
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/15/2015 :  10:34:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Håkan;

You could make the pond appear less stagnant by having both an inlet, and outlet for water. Have what appears to be a small low head dam at the far end of the pond, with a water channel coming in under the track work, and an adjustable outlet near the sawmill, with a solid stone wall, and an adjustable screw dam gate, in a metal frame, with a screw mechanism that allows the operator to control the volume of water within the pond. IE it can be opened in the rain to prevent flooding, close it when he is getting in logs, and drop the level when not operating.

Here is a typical low head dam, with inlet channel. Now, this is a modern version, but the technology is the same, and can be made with rocks/dirt, or if you want a more permanent structure, you can cement the rocks, then parge the faces against the water, (parge: to coat with mortar, or cement to make a more impermeable surface)

I found some nice pics, but they will not post.

ARRRRRRRRRRGH.

Horse




Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 07/18/2015 :  05:08:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Horse I haven't done my homework in parts on this sawmill installation when planning the layout. However as it is now I haven't the space for many of the features so I have to ponder what to do. I found a picture of a model pond that have a stagnant look that I think looks good.



The pictures you couldn't post. Do you have the links to them?

Thanks
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1642 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/18/2015 :  07:14:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Apropos of your concern about bubbles in the water: Enviro-Tex has very low viscosity just after it's poured, so I've never seen a bubble in a water body made of it. Of course, this is why the bottom has to be thoroughly water-tight, the support carefully leveled and you have to be careful about it creeping up details that protrude from the surface.


Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 07/18/2015 :  09:21:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They did a nice job on their Mill.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4563 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/18/2015 :  7:46:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Alright, going to try this again.

This first is a typical low head dam. This is a fairly modern one, with concrete, but the same can be accomplished with rocks, and dirt, or logs, driven as pilings, with rocks piled up against them, then dirt, or clay to create a less permeable surface



This second is the point for the sluice gates, which will be in the next picture



This is a pair of gates, note the screw mechanism on top to open, or close the sluice gates to control the volume of water IN the pond.

For some reason, it just will not allow this photo



These are barriers used to direct, and/or slow the flow of water, both entering, and exiting the controlled zone (in this case the pond). These serve to reduce overflow on entry, and flooding downstream.




Edited by - CavalryTrooper25 on 07/19/2015 09:22:53 AM

Country: | Posts: 509 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/18/2015 :  7:53:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hal Reynolds showed a really nice canal gate mechanism at the Springfield show earlier this year. It's part of a kit he has under development. But several of us told him we'd love to have that mechanism as a separate part.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6983 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/19/2015 :  02:14:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Horse --

All three of those photos were accepted on the forum. Notice that you have {img}at BOTH the beginning and the end of the string for each photo ...

The SECOND one should have a slash and look almost like this: {/img}

(but use the square brackets instead of the squiggly brackets)

For example, here's the smallest picture with the corrected code (slash added):



Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/19/2015 :  09:28:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For some reason, the picture of the actual sluice gates won't come up, the system keeps telling me it is some sort of error.

Anyway, imagine a metal frame around a wooden gate, that is moved, up, or down, by way of a long threaded shaft. Above the shaft, mounted to the upper cross brace is a large wheel, that is used to draw the threaded shaft, thus controlling the opening of the gate.

Horse




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