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Author Previous Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR Topic Next Topic: The Coos Bay and Willamette Valley
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robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2013 :  8:55:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hakan, Nice to see you posting again. What a wonderful looking loco you've built. Those old timers sure have lots of character.
Looking forward to more updates.


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, it's still popular.

Country: Australia | Posts: 1844 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2013 :  10:20:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Awesome loco!

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12711 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/21/2013 :  6:25:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Frank for your kind words. On the question on airbrushing Vallejos paint.
I use about 1.5-2 bars (22-29 psi) pressure on the airbrush. I thin the Vallejo paint to the consistancy of thick milk with destilled water. Also I usually add a tiny amount of Vallejos drying retarder (called retarder medium) to delay the drying time. When airbrushing I make certain to be fairly close about 4 to 5 inches and with a passing speed so I get a wet film on the surface without the paint running. The paint then dries flat without a sandpaper finish.

Hi Bob,
all the striping and decals are home made in Coreldraw. The hand wheel is from Diamond scale products.
http://www.diamond-scale.com/

The overall color on the tender is black with 5% white mixed in. If you mean the thicker bands at the bottom of the tank and at the top it is a red brown colored decal.

Many thanks Robert and Mike!

Håkan



Edited by - masonamerican on 06/21/2013 6:28:17 PM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2013 :  4:04:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi again,
after finishing the 4-4-0 I have had a itch or should I say an urge to do some structure modeling. This model railroad hobby is so wonderful and versatile so if one tire of one aspect one can always jump into another.

I have a small ledge on the layout with a passing track and a siding where I have thought to have an industry. Unfortunately the space between the track is very limited with only about 1-1/2" between the backdrop and the track so the building have to fit this space.


I had an idea for a Victorian factory building and made a rough 3D sketch in Google SketchUp.


With the name I'm probably on very deep water concerning "Manufactory" but I think it sounds cool.

From the 3D sketch I bought some Grandtline windows and details and after some 2D sketching I came out with the sketch and placement of the various components below.

There will also be widow walks on the roofs.

As this is my second building (ok half building) and I'm a total novice when it comes to buildings I would much appreciate any feedback before I start to cut into the wood sheets.

The factory part will be in the left main part of the building and as they make wagons the double doors are for taking the wagons out. One of the dormer windows above on the upper floor will be substituted by a door with a lifting beam above, the idea that wood and material are lifted, transported and stored on the upper floor. The tower part will house the offices.
The house will be in wood with a stone foundation.

Thanks,
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2013 :  4:16:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like a very nice structure to be! The upper windows in the "tower" looks like they are down to the floor... if available I would substitute them for the smaller variety used to their left for a more logical, unified appearance.... What kind of wood are you using for subwalls?

I'll be more than happy to lend you a hand if you should get stuck (and since we are practically neighbors ;o), but have every confidence you'll manage just fine on your own! Have fun!


Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4906 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2013 :  4:36:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks a lot Troels!
This was precisely what I was after. I'll substitute the windows for the smaller ones.

I'm thinking of using lapped siding. Beneath the brackets (the part directly below the roof down to the first line) I'll use wide planks as I have seen this on some buildings.
Your help is much appreciated!

Håkan




Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/23/2013 :  4:42:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Go to images.google.com and enter mansard roof and you'll get LOTS of inspiration. I'm disappointed more vendors don't make kits with mansard roofs.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7091 Go to Top of Page

Martin Welberg
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2013 :  5:16:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Martin Welberg's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Like this design, great job on the loco !


Country: Netherlands | Posts: 6686 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/23/2013 :  5:54:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The building looks Good Håkan. AS Drawn it would make a good station and certainly will work as a factory, especially if you add the planed 2nd story door. You could add wainscoting to the bottom of the window frames (or bricks). A metal roof and a roof over the loading dock. Use the same building method you did on your station and you'll do just fine.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4682 Go to Top of Page

brownbr
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/23/2013 :  6:05:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking forward to the build. You are right about being able to change things up in this hobby. How nice is that.

Bryan

Country: USA | Posts: 1474 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/24/2013 :  12:14:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Dave, wow there was a lot of inspiration to be seen there. Most roofs and houses looks quite complicated to build. I'll see if I can keep the main features yet simplify.

Thanks Martin!

Bob, thanks, I had not thought of a roof above the loading dock but now I'll incorporate it.

Thanks Bryan!

Back to the drawing board.
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/24/2013 :  3:18:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi again,
from the drawing board. I have tried to incorporate a roof over the loading dock. Its situated below the brackets and a it is not so deep so I think brackets every 8-10' will suffice to hold it up? I came up with an idea for the loading dock and that is to let the stone foundation go out below the loading dock and let the platform rest on the stone foundation. At the end of the platform there will be a stair to the ground. One thing that is bothering me is the separation of the windows upstairs so they are in harmony with the windows, doors and double door below. If the 4 upstair windows get nicely separated (in my opinion) the double door below comes to near the end of the building. Any ideas?



Thanks,
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/24/2013 :  7:44:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Håkan, I apologize for "highjacking" your thread but I hope these pictures will help you.
This is my Main Station on Coos Bay at South Slough which is a stone throw (for a boy) over the south border of Marshfield (today's Coos Bay) Oregon. Like my layout it's over 23 years old and needs restoration too. No! not a total rebuild just a few repairs, cleaning and painting. The Station is an SS ltd. kit that I mirrored the layout of. I always do something to a kit to make it unique.
The board you see about 3' below the main roof line is where the platform roof joins the building. I took off the roof so you can see how the building is framed. Today, I would (and will) add more wall support. But this has lasted decades. In the third picture you can see how the roof is built. Would you like plans of this building? I think I still have them around.







And on the freight doors. You can make it smaller. They only have to be big enough to get the biggest wagon you envision your factory to make. (and do remember that often wagons were shipped broken down into components to be assembled by a local dealer) That goes for the 2nd floor door also. If you're receiving only lumber, hardware components and the occasional wood working machine you only need a 4' door.

I hope this helps

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4682 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 06/25/2013 :  07:29:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Bob, the pictures are very helpful. Beautiful building you have there! I have never seen this kit before but one certainly can think so as my drawing looks very similar. The suggestion on th double door was very helpful, I'll see if I can make it smaller.

Thanks for the kind offer on the drawings! If you have the time to scan and email them they would be most helpful.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1663 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 06/25/2013 :  07:42:24 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
One thing I've learned the hard way, is to brace the walls heavily. 1/8" square stock for HO scale is not heavy enough to withstand warping. Use 3/16' or 1/4" whenever you can. It can also give you corners more butting surfaces for gluing together as well.

Dave


Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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