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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/11/2013 :  4:45:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What is the material the truck is actually made of? And where do you get it? How well will it hold up to hours of operation? Thanks

Hope you head is feeling better!


Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12714 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2013 :  2:57:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You're probably right Bob and Grandtrunk.

Thanks Mike, it feels a lot better now.

The material that I ordered and they used in the 3D printing process is called FUD, fine ultra detail. Here is a link to what it is composed of.
http://www.shapeways.com/materials/frosted-detail

I can't attest to how well it holds up as I have no operation hours on any of the 3D printed trucks just yet. To compare it to another material it feels a little like resin but not as brittle. It is quite hard but is easy to scrape with a Xacto knife. I believe it will give many, many miles on a model railroad.

There is a lot of stuff on Shapeways for model railroaders, go to their shop pages and you will find the Panamint shop and some others sellers.

http://www.shapeways.com/gallery/miniatures/model-trains?sort=newest


Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/13/2013 :  3:01:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dnaldimodaroloc

The most extensive discussion of the red trucks is in National Car Builder, April 1884 p. 47. Describes trucks painted all red except for wheels and axles. Does not distinguish between front and rear of wheels. Apparently the red paint helped inspectors see defects in the trucks.

Adrian Hundhausen



Thanks for your answer Adrian.

Do you know any online source for the National car builder?

Håkan



Edited by - masonamerican on 05/13/2013 4:44:11 PM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

dnaldimodaroloc
New Hire

Posted - 05/13/2013 :  10:03:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Haakan,

here is a link to the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City. They got a grant from BNSF and digitised a huge number of 19th century RR journals:

http://lhldigital.lindahall.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/rrjournal

You have to be patient with their search engine. It is fussy about capital letters and suchlike.
For National car builder, try this:

http://lhldigital.lindahall.org/cdm/search/collection/rrjournal/searchterm/National%20car%20builder/order/nosort

Then if the search function says "within results" you can simply enter a year and get all the issues for that year. They have a couple dozen other journals digitised as well, not just NCB. God fornojelse.

Adrian




Country: | Posts: 8 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/15/2013 :  08:53:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Adrian! This will give some interesting reading.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/18/2013 :  3:01:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi All,
My wheel sets from NWSL arrived some days and I could continue with the Arbour 4-4-0 project. The status is that I have assembled everything mechanically and wired the ESU Select decoder in the tender. Today it took its first revolutions on the rails and after some tinkering with the decoder settings it ran quite good. The suspension with the first driver being able to move laterally worked well. Here is a Youtube video showing the locomotive running:
http://youtu.be/zkQdBi3iHyc


As you can see in the video the front of the locomotive doesn't swivel out as usually is the case with average HO 4-4-0 model.

Picture are merciless to detect things and one thing I noticed in the video is that the pilot sits to high. Hard to change now but I'll see if I can come up with something. Otherwise there are some details still left to add and then it is time for painting. I will try to paint everything mostly in pieces to avoid doing some extensive masking. The loco will be painted black in a freelance Pennsylvania livery theme with gold striping and gold letters on red background

Håkan



Edited by - masonamerican on 05/18/2013 3:31:46 PM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/18/2013 :  4:29:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Håkan, it looks like a nice smooth runner.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14565 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/18/2013 :  11:09:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Has to be the best Arbour built I've seen.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/19/2013 :  03:19:45 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks George and Bob,
It runs quite good even that in the video looks like its jerking from time to time which is because of the recording quality. But it has a very small hesitation going forward which I could not get rid of. If one turned up the decoders fine tuning back-EMF values it actually got worse. It runs best on nearly pure DC.

Today it will be rolled into the paintshop.

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 05/21/2013 :  4:40:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


“Yesterday our county was visited by the world famous actress Sarah Bernhardt who among the local attractions visited Cathedral Springs. The ensemble traveling together with Ms Bernhardt were the Daniel E Bandmanns Theater company whom for the occasion had chartered one of C.R.&.N.Co passenger cars. Sarah Bernhardt with them on tour from Europe can be seen on the left together with Mr Bandmann. After admiring the “largest tree in the world” they all took Champagne refreshments and then retired to the car for the journey back to San Francisco. During their stay they also visited the Spring itself where they tried the refreshing mineral water. Sarah Bernhardt exclaimed and stated that she never had tasted a water so invigorating.”

The Innsmouth Chronicle, 24 of July 1892



Hi all, the Tourist trap at Cathedral Springs is nearly finished and I thought to show some pictures of it and the people visiting it. As usual the local rag could not keep away and they found the morning headlines in the visit of the actress Sarah Bernhardt.


Overview of the area


The local artist painting the local vistas. Should get himself some thinner paint brushes as those he has can't be easy to wield
Hmm...has a little resemblance to a famous artist here on the forum. Perhaps an ancestor?


A little family drama. The actor T Flynns attempt to straighten things with his fiancé after a much too wet evening out failed miserably as the fiancé threw his flower reconciliation on the ground.


The local freight train arrives


The theater ensemble listen to the local guide while waiting to take refreshments


Ms Bernhardt and Mr Bandmann reads the sign on the tree.


The upper train platform


The light is scarce among the trees



The figures are mostly all from Preiser which I have modified with different postures. Some of them was also repainted to give a different look to them.

I hope you enjoyed my little fantasy!
Comments and suggestions are always welcome!

Happy modeling!
Håkan



Edited by - masonamerican on 05/21/2013 4:44:19 PM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 05/21/2013 :  5:31:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Håkan,your story is entertaining & your scenes are very believable!
Good to see you now using your head in the proper way.
The only thing I could think of adding to your already beautiful scene, are some benches maybe along the railings of your tree viewing platform.
I know I'd want to sit down after climbing all those steps up to it.

Greg Shinnie




Country: Canada | Posts: 7693 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2013 :  5:53:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The local artist looks a little bit like Troels Kirk...

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7093 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2013 :  6:55:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent, Håkan. I like all the details down to the dead leaves on the platform.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14565 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/21/2013 :  7:18:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, just excellent Håkan.
The ground cover is looking a lot better too.
The LP really brings the scene alive.
The painter does look like Troels- down to the big brush!

Super job


It's only make-believe

Edited by - railman28 on 05/21/2013 7:39:27 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/22/2013 :  12:34:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow! These scenes are SO beautiful! Really nice to see all the tastefully done colors ... and remind ourselves that the world was never really black-n-white.

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page
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