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Author Previous Topic: Brets Brewery (CSM) Construction Thead Topic Next Topic: scratch building the idaho hotel in o scale
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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 05/07/2020 :  08:08:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lots to take in visually, great addition for a prominent location.


Country: USA | Posts: 3104 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/07/2020 :  09:17:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I like all the nooks and crannies and juttings out, varieties of roofing and siding, the shingles especially, and the appearance of free form evolution that obviously has purpose.




Country: USA | Posts: 6610 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/09/2020 :  5:32:12 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Lots to take in visually, great addition for a prominent location.


Thanks very much, Bill.

I think viewing through the open aerial walkway will add another dimension. I'm trying hard to just chip away at things in a logical order, finishing as I go. There's lots of cool stuff (like the aerial walkway) to come, which I'd love to get into now, but trying to just plod on.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/09/2020 :  5:37:03 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
I like all the nooks and crannies and juttings out, varieties of roofing and siding, the shingles especially, and the appearance of free form evolution that obviously has purpose.


Thanks, Michael.

I've decided to add some more shingles to the roof. I think the roofs will mainly be rolled roofing and corrugated iron, so decided the in between roof might look good in shingles.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/09/2020 :  5:48:08 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi guys.

I decided on corrugated iron for the gable roof and shingles for the roof in between.

I cut my iron to the required length - long enough to completely cover the card at the bottom, and sit down just a fraction from the ridge. I cut a little over half the required material at one length, and a little over half very slightly longer. I then taped one piece of iron to the cutting mat with a piece of tape at each end marked with the purlin lines in pencil. I use a ruler and a compass to press down in every second undulation, hard enough to leave a circular raised knob when flipped, but not so hard that the compass pierces the iron. With the second piece I kept the top of the sheet in the same position as the first. This means the lead headed nails will be in slightly different positions on the sheets. The iron is then cut into the required widths. I score once with a sharp knife and then snap by wiggling back and forth. I covered the roof in double sided tape, added fly rafters, and glued to the building. Once the glue was dry, I peeled back the double sided tape and carefully added the iron. I varied the two different lengths of iron, but kept the rows of lead headed nails in line. This results in sheets of slightly different lengths, but with the nails still in lines.

Photo 1 - shows the iron ready for adding the lead headed nails. You can see my ruler guideline marks on the painters tape at each end.


Photo 2 - I then smoothed out a piece of aluminium foil and stuck it to a piece of double sided tape. I cut a piece to the desired width to act as a ridge cap flashing. I then carefully peel back one end of the tape backing and use painters tape to attach this, sticky side up, to the cutting mat. The rest of the backing is then removed and a piece of painters tape added at the other end, pulling the foil straight and taut.


I cut a piece of thin plastic rod to the ridge length and carefully lay this down the centre of the foil. I cut the foil slightly longer than the rod, so that a flashing can be bent down over the end of the rod. I kind of meld the foil over the rod, using my finger and thumb, and the carefully place it along the ridge line. The foil is then worked down onto the roof and then into the undulations of the iron with a toothpick. This is where it is important to have kept the sheets of iron just down from the ridge line. It gives something for the rod to adhere to (the double sided tape on the roof ridge), and aids with positioning.

Photo 3 - shows the roof in position and the ridge cap flashing completed.


Next was the central gutter. I glued a piece of U-channel to a piece of bracing timber, fitted to span the roof at the back of the two-storied building. I melded a piece of high tack painters tape into the U-channel, leaving a flashing sitting up to go along the clapboard wall. I painted this grey and glued into position. I marked the top of the piece of card with pencil lines for shingle positioning, and attached shingles as described previously.

Photo 4 - shows the roof from the back. You can see the central gutter.


More soon, cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/10/2020 :  02:18:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, nice work on the corrugated roof. The nail holes are very well done.


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, It's still popular

Country: Australia | Posts: 2457 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/10/2020 :  08:03:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's the first time I've seen nails modeled on a corrugated metal roof. Well done.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 16271 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/10/2020 :  08:58:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Excellent roofing job indeed. Your approach keeps everything subtle and in scale.


Country: USA | Posts: 6610 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/10/2020 :  09:04:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice work Mark.


Country: USA | Posts: 3920 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/10/2020 :  3:43:12 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Mark, nice work on the corrugated roof. The nail holes are very well done.


Thanks, Robert.

Only I think we should call them lead headed nails. There is no hole to speak of, and they stick up, not down. All you have to do is flip the sheets when installing them.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/10/2020 :  3:52:38 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
That's the first time I've seen nails modeled on a corrugated metal roof. Well done.


Thanks, George.

I first tried this technique a number of years ago. Back on page 32 of this thread is a far more complex roof done in iron. It shows what can be done if you take your time and work methodically.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/10/2020 :  4:02:59 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Excellent roofing job indeed. Your approach keeps everything subtle and in scale.


Thanks very much, Michael.

As lead headed nails are always visible in the prototype I see it as important that we model them.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/10/2020 :  4:04:28 PM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Very nice work Mark.



Thanks so much, Carl.

Cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/25/2020 :  01:16:25 AM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi guys.

Sorry for the delay. I never quite got around to uploading my last slice of progress - so here it is now.

Well, I have the porch completed and the shingle roof on.

I started by decking the porch floor. The last piece I marked for the position of my posts and carefully cut these post clearances out of this piece of decking. I then used this as a guide for drawing up a plan of the porch on my cutting table. The height of the posts was found by measuring from the deck to the lean-to roof where the front of the porch was to sit, deducting the height of the beam, and adding on the thickness of the joists and decking.

Photo 1 - shows the porch front assembled. You can see my 30/60 plastic template I used for positioning the angle brackets.


When dry, I flipped the front over and glued on the piece of decking with the post cutouts.

Photo 2 - shows the deck front glued in position.


There was a slight discrepancy in height, so I opted to address this by cutting birds mouths in the rafters to sit over the beam. This is very prototypical.

Photo 3 - shows my tiny birds mouths.


I made up a cardboard spacer to hold the end of the porch in the correct position and glued on the shingle roof. I used high tack painters tape as the back flashing which I painted dark brown to closely match the colour of the shingles. This was installed prior to gluing on the roof.

Photos 4 & 5 - show the completed porch and shingle roof. These photos were taken at night so are a bit shadowy.




You can see the corrugated roof is painted. I'm not quite happy with this and will attack it at a later date. I do, however, think I have pulled it back from a total re-roof - which was looking possible! I primed with Dullcote, then painted gun metal and then dark green. I have samples that I did years ago using these colours and they look great. My attempts on this roof, however, looked awful. I painted with thinners to remove the majority of the green and then tried dry brushing with off white to tone down. This didn't work either. I then attacked the roof with rust coloured pigments - which is where we are now. I did have one of those moments last night when I said out loud 'OK - time to walk away'. I went and tortured some Bach on the piano instead.

More soon, cheers, Mark.



Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page

mark_dalrymple
Fireman

Posted - 05/25/2020 :  01:50:48 AM  Show Profile  Send mark_dalrymple an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Hi again.

Firstly, here is a photo showing the roofs.


Well - I then went on a slight tangent. As this project moves forward there is more and more fragile additions added to the front and above the wooden wharf and so I thought I had better think about some details to add. In my search I found what I assume are large ovens for cooking the canned fish. They were wonderful looking details, and so I decided to have a go at scratch-building a couple to fit on the wharf. I wanted them to be fairly visible (there is still a whole suspended deck area to go over most of the wharf) and came to the conclusion that there wasn't enough depth. Not to be deterred I decided that they could be built through the brick wall, with the oven doors at the front on the deck, and the ovens protruding a short way onto the deck. This way I would have room for overhead beams, pulleys to open the sliding doors, and piping for the steam to heat - all of which are great features. I decided to attempt to cut circles on thin sheet styrene, and found that by using a set of dividers and scribing a fairly deep groove and then following up with a knife and nail files, I could get a pretty decent circle.

Photo 1 - shows the inspiration behind all this extra work.


Photo 2 & 3 - I cut four circles the same diameter and then marked the reinforcement braces on two of them. I used a large needle to impress rivets (when flipped 180 degrees) around the outside and on the two central braces. I then scribed/ cut the unwanted material out, leaving just a thin outer circle and the two vertical braces. These I glued over the top of my other two circles. I then cut a piece of irrigation piping into two short, even lengths. I used the left over styrene around two of the circles (I did pre think this) to create a front by scribing and cutting two wider half circles around the bottom of the front. I decided to keep the two ovens attached at the top for strength and ease of fitting. I glued this front to the two pieces of irrigation pipe. To set the doors back a bit in the oven, I held the two doors together back to back with a circular piece of baking paper between them (to stop them gluing together) and rolled them centrally onto a thin piece of strip styrene, gluing as I went. I then used a sharp knife to cut the thin styrene in half and separated the two doors. I carefully pushed the two doors into the irrigation pipe from the back, rotated until lined up nicely, and glued from the back. I boxed out the sides and top of the unit, filing the sides to sharp edges so that they met the irrigation pipe centrally on the sides, which left the bottom section curved.



Photo 4 - I cut 1mm sheet styrene into two oven lids, canter-levered slightly at the front and sides.


Photo 5 - I srcibed and cut a larger half circle and marked and cut out the top of the two doors. These tops are attached to pulleys above and the doors slide up to open. I drilled holes in the top corners for attaching to the pulleys.


More soon, cheers, Mark.



Edited by - mark_dalrymple on 05/25/2020 02:05:23 AM

Country: New Zealand | Posts: 1230 Go to Top of Page
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