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Author Previous Topic: Scenery Topic Next Topic: Subroadbed, Roadbed and Track
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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 08/30/2016 :  6:54:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by keystonefarm

Mark try putting a 2-3"strip of plaster cloth around the edges . Then after it sets a bit just cut cloth and place it dry over the tape. Then using a spray bottle and a brush wet the cloth and brush it out. I've found laying out the plaster gauze dry is much less messy and uses less water . The 2-3" strip will give the larger pieces something to grab on to. ---- Ken



Ken, it's funny you mention that again. You suggested that before, and Harsco just made that same suggestion. I'm going to try it!

Thanks!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/30/2016 :  8:00:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've read about people using rosin paper and glue to make scenery base, but I've never tried it myself. It should be fairly easy to make something as strong as the paper mache' masks, dragon heads etc. you see here & there.


Country: USA | Posts: 5203 Go to Top of Page

sjconrail
Engine Wiper



Posted - 08/30/2016 :  8:11:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit sjconrail's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

I've read about people using rosin paper and glue to make scenery base, but I've never tried it myself. It should be fairly easy to make something as strong as the paper mache' masks, dragon heads etc. you see here & there.



I was kinda thinking Mark could keep using the masking tape and then put that rosin paper over it with the glue mixture,

Phil



Country: USA | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

BessemerBob
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  08:25:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very impressive scene underway.

Glad to see a real representation of the massive structure of a colliery.


"the sleep of a laboring man is sweet"

Country: USA | Posts: 125 Go to Top of Page

HobbyDr
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/31/2016 :  10:10:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit HobbyDr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I wouldn't worry so much about the tape losing adhesion as the plaster cloth adhering to the slick surface of the tape. Maybe a few strategic punctures with a toothpick to create some 'keyways' are in order.

Don


Visit HobbyDr's Workbench http://hobbydr.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 256 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 08/31/2016 :  11:56:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks like I've generated an interesting exchange of ideas and thoughts. After reading some of these comments and also speaking with Rick, I've decided to use the plaster cloth over top of the existing masking tape shell that I have created. Initially I thought that the masking tape itself would provide a strong base onto which I would apply my textures. I still feel that as it is now, it would work well. However, the big question is what will happen over time. While masking tape will dry out over time, I planned to paint over it, sealing the tape. That should work, right? But what about where the adhesive currently makes contact with the support structure. What would happen over time? Would this dry out and then lose contact? Would the 'shell' then start to sag over time?

These are all the questions that surfaced since I began this project. So, to play it safe, I'm going to go over this shell with the plaster cloth. This will be self supporting over time. The masking tape shell will provide a nice base onto which I will apply a layer of the cloth, and I will try the method Ken suggested above; spraying the cloth with water instead of the 'dip and spread' method. I like this idea as it seems more controllable and less messy.

With regard to the rosin paper method, I have never tried that. I believe fellow forum member Vagel uses this on his railroad, but he would have to explain his method, his likes and dislikes about it. Since I've used the plaster cloth in the past and do like the results, I'll stick with that as I know it works and is the least messy of any method I've tried in the past.


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

LVRALPH
Fireman



Posted - 09/02/2016 :  06:01:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
LOOKING GOOD!


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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/02/2016 :  11:15:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ralph!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/06/2016 :  8:52:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After giving my approach to the culm hill a lot of thought, I came to my senses and decided to take a more traditional approach and use plaster cloth for the hard shell instead of just masking tape. I am really glad I did this too! As I was applying the plaster cloth, I noted that as the masking tape got wet (which it would have when I applied textures), it became very loose and unmanageable. The masking tape makes a great temporary support for the plaster cloth, but it would not have held up as a ‘hard shell’ unto itself.

I also took some advice from Harsco and Keystonefarm and tried a different approach to applying the plaster cloth. I used to cut the cloth into manageable strips, dip them into water and then apply them to the area. While this works, it was messy and sometimes not as controllable as I would like. This time I cut the cloth to the desired size, laid it in place, then sprayed it with wet water until it was wet. I then used my fingers to ‘tuck’ it into place and smooth out the edges. It worked out great! Thanks Rick and Ken!

So here is the culm hill now with plaster cloth applied.



Once the plaster cloth set, I gave the entire hill a heavy coat of black paint. I also cut out some backdrops and placed them on either side of the hill.



And a view from the other direction. I am really pleased with how the hill came out and while it is scaled down and doesn’t truly scale out correctly in relation to the size of the overall complex, it still gives a good feel to the area.



With the culm hill now defined and in place, it’s time to start finalizing the layout of the complex. Glen Burn was built on a hillside, and accordingly, the buildings and roadways accessing the complex were also on that hill side. This means that everything is on different levels. This means a lot of retaining walls!

This photo shows the left hand side of the complex. Here you can see the highest level, which is what will be the roadway from the bridge. You can see where I have roughed out the driveway into the complex that heads downgrade into the complex to what I call the ‘main level’. Then behind the building, another driveway continues further downgrade to the lower level where the materials handling building will be located.



All of these levels were defined by a series of concrete retaining walls, which I have started to make. This particular wall is against the hill side behind the complex. I have cut all of the walls from foam core and am now applying strips of cardboard to simulate the capping and pilasters. I have a lot of walls to make!



I am also now working on a final placement of all of the buildings. It is all starting to come together!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 09/06/2016 :  8:56:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
It sure does look like it is coming together, Mark! That culm bank looks right, to me.

Chuck



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sjconrail
Engine Wiper



Posted - 09/06/2016 :  8:57:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit sjconrail's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good Mark. Glad the whole masking tape/plaster cloth worked out for you,

Phil



Country: USA | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/06/2016 :  9:01:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

It sure does look like it is coming together, Mark! That culm bank looks right, to me.

Chuck



Thanks Chuck! When I put it back up after painting it, I was kind of surprised with how well it came out. While not as big as the real one, it will do a good job of dwarfing the complex! And I think once I get the textures on it, it will really pop!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 09/07/2016 :  08:19:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
What are you going to use to cover that culm bank, Mark?

Chuck



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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/07/2016 :  09:15:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

What are you going to use to cover that culm bank, Mark?

Chuck



I'm not totally sure Chuck, but a variety of materials. I plan to use something finer at the top, and then larger textures towards the bottom. The idea is to force the illusion of distance by using progressively smaller textures from bottom to top.

I was thinking of using black sand at the top, various scales of cinders, increasing the size of cinders from top to bottom.

John R. has cinder material that he collected from a Jersey Central RR facility years ago that he breaks up and uses as culm on his layout. It looks great, and I may use that towards the bottom where I want larger textures.


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13368 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/07/2016 :  1:11:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a large hill, Mark! I think you made a good decision to use plaster cloth.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 13943 Go to Top of Page
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