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Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/18/2008 :  4:49:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jos, thanks for the explanation. Your trees are fabulous, and seeing your pines leaves me speechless.


Country: France | Posts: 17633 Go to Top of Page

scotchpine
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/18/2008 :  5:38:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well the pc is okay and healthy again..pfff so Here IŽll start with the " how to "...finaly!
First we're going to have a frame...

If You buy/find a ready to go frame just skip this first part..
If you want to built your own frames with floristic wires ...so let's continue!
I start with the "how to" of a birch tree, Actualy you can use this for , almost, any trees you want to make...
* The wires I use are 0,6 mm thick/diam. and,as told before, bought in a flowershop.
The "inside"of the trunk is made of thick wire: about 1,5 mm diam.
The bottom of that wire , let's say 1 1/2 inch will be used as a (ground)pin .
Start to turn/twist carefully the o.6 mm diam. wire around the thick wire .
To get a trunk of 2 iches you need 2-3 wires for it. Than start to make the branches . Just have a closer look at the drawing...It saves me a lot of text in english to explain how it could be done!

in real :

detail( already primered...):

when done:

May be starting with a small one...?:

Making frames out of wires can be difficult in the beginning so I add some more pics how a trunk and "starting to make branches" looks like:
a clooser look of a trunk (from another kind tree):

Also here an abstract drawing/design(?) of a birch ( Betula pendula) so you have a guidance when modelling the frame. This is what I do first when making a new kind of tree! So a kind of abstraction.

In that way you can make any frame for all kind of trees:

Back to the frame of a birch.
When ready you have to primer the wires. I use primer out of spraycans. ( got a well ventilated basement!)Painting can be done too, just do what you like/what is healthy

When the frame is primered and dry, you can start to make the bark by adding very fine sawdust with a mix of white glue and a very litlle water.. I "make" this sawdust to sift it with a fine kitchen sieve.

closer look , here you can see the difference between the fine and the rough sawdust...

Don't use rough sawdust it won't work as bark: it is/looks to sharp. The texture is to rough.
But there is aaalways an ecxeption: for the bottom of the trunk we need some less fine sawdust...but talk about that later...



Jos



Edited by - scotchpine on 09/13/2011 4:59:18 PM

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 332 Go to Top of Page

NE Brownstone
Crew Chief



Posted - 09/18/2008 :  5:49:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit NE Brownstone's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Excellent!


Country: USA | Posts: 555 Go to Top of Page

rfmicro
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/19/2008 :  05:49:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice techniques. I liked the added wire twisted around the trunk for branches. That appears somewhat easier than working with individual strands (from the trunk) for branches as you go up the main trunk.

I will be anxiously waiting on how best to apply 'bark' to your trees. I have tried something similar using grout, wood putty and finally WS paste with varying degrees of failure. Regretfully, I ended up with more 'bark' on me than on the tree. Perhaps not adding the primer was where my attempts failed.

Regards,



Country: USA | Posts: 532 Go to Top of Page

scotchpine
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/19/2008 :  07:25:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
part 2:
I only have one pic of a frame of a birchtree with the added sawdust using the "MIX" to glue them on the wires. so I show also another kind of type of tree with sawdust..


making the "MIX" you need:
*white glue
*a litlle bit of water
*AND some drops of dishdetergent,
is a litlle bit tricky: the mix should be not to thick , otherwise it won't absorbe the dry sawdust but at the other hand: not to watery/thin! In the last case the mix will flow down over your hands...so experience/finding out a litlle bit first.
Adding the sawdust is easy:
first paint the wires with the""mix:


Direct after that add the sawdust with a sieve carefully over the painted wires.
[URL=http://i.picoodle.com/623d16bp][/URL]
result:( lost the original picture had to make another frame to make a picture)
[URL=http://i.picoodle.com/d7chqead][/URL]

IMPORTANT: if using sawdust of MDF use a mask to protect from the dust it is toxic when inhale it very often! )
making the mix of:
*white glue
*a litlle bit of water
*AND some drops of dishdetergent,

To thicken the trunk you can just add more layers of sawdust..short after you've done the first ones. Sometimes even to 6-8 X like this trunk. If the sawdust+ mix are stil wett, you can model the trunk carefully with a BBQ stickor point of a cutter etc.....

continue soon!










Edited by - scotchpine on 09/13/2011 5:30:36 PM

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 332 Go to Top of Page

rfmicro
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/19/2008 :  11:16:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Jos,

I see said the blindman. I think I will retire to the basement and start following along with your thread and build some trees.

Regards,



Country: USA | Posts: 532 Go to Top of Page

rrkreitler
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 09/19/2008 :  11:53:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is great information, thanks for sharing!

The sawdust "bark" really looks good.

I am surprised that you use the same technique for pines, but they look great too.

I am looking forward to the rest of your process. Oh, and if you are taking requests, I would really like to see you make a pine tree (foliage too).

Thanks for sharing your techniques!


Thanks,
Dave K in NB

Country: USA | Posts: 853 Go to Top of Page

scotchpine
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/19/2008 :  4:17:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Trent and Dave!

it is a litlle bit off-topic but thought I could place/post this too overhere.

About modelling the bark of trunks and big branches:
I often use kitchenpaper to give the bark a more rough texture. I torn small pieces of the kitchenpapertowl, lets say 1 X 1/2 inch and dip it in the "mix"( whiteglue/water/drops of dishdetergent)and place it with a tweezer on the spots were they should belong .
Modelling these wett pieces op paper can be done with a short haired small brush or the point of a cutter/needle or toothpick...
I mostly add some darkgrey.brown acrylpaint to the "mix" so you can see better the final results.
When the paperbark has dried I paint it in a 'basic'color and weather it by painting it with deluted "Humbrol enamel matt paint( adding LOT of terpintin to the humbrol paint) So the paint will creep everywhere! and the elevation will stay almost clean!
Last thing to do is drybrushing with a lighter color.
To immitate moos on the trunk and roots I use sieved fine turf from WS burnt grass. Also colored with deluted(a lot of terpintin) humbrol paint
A pollard willow HO: bark modelled with kitchenpaper dipped in whiteglue/water/drops of dishdet.

The frame of an old large oaktree: combination of sawdust - upper parts and kitchenpaper/WS fine turf on the lowerparts HO scale

The trunk and branches of a beechtree.
here I used plaster of paris and some whitegluemix/sawdust to model the bark. First the sawdust and when dry I added the very liquid plaster of paris( colored grey!)with a cheap longhaired brush. because of the "mix: the plaster wont't dry that fast so time enough to model the bark. When dry I sanded the surface of the trunk and branches with waterproof paper...and this is what came out after weathering/paintin with some darker deluted humbrol paint.


tomorrow I hope to post the "how to"about finishing the bark of the birch and how to add the fibers...

Jos



Edited by - scotchpine on 09/13/2011 5:06:43 PM

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 332 Go to Top of Page

LynnB
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/19/2008 :  6:45:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Great how to.I wander if this will get transfered over to the Scenery thread for ease of future reference?
Just wandering as I right up the shopping list, what gauge of wire do the mm sizes convert to?



Country: Canada | Posts: 2314 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 09/19/2008 :  6:55:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lynn, 1 inch = 25 mm (in fact 25.4) so 1 mm = 0.04" (very close to...).
Hope this helps.



Country: France | Posts: 17633 Go to Top of Page

rfmicro
Crew Chief

Posted - 09/19/2008 :  7:40:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
1.5 mm equates to 0.059 inches or approx. 15-16 AWG, and 0.6 mm equates to 0.0236 inches or 22-23 AWG. The AWG should help search for products and vendors.

Regards,



Country: USA | Posts: 532 Go to Top of Page

belg
Fireman



Posted - 09/20/2008 :  06:33:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jos, thanks for sharing your very creative process wit us, and really look forward to seeing the rest of the build. Pat


Edited by - belg on 09/20/2008 06:36:22 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4500 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 09/20/2008 :  11:34:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Super trees and super tutorial, Jos! This thread is an absolute "must" to save to my "favorites" for sure. I second the earlier request to have you produce a DVD. For sure I'd buy one too!


Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

scotchpine
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/20/2008 :  5:52:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tanks mrrcolleagues!
It turns out a little bit chaotic, this thread but I will start to explain how to color the frames:
I use cheap latex wallpaint. In this case: white. I adde some ivory acrylpaint to it to make the white not to bright, to soften the tone of the color.
I paint only the trunk and the large/main branches.

The smaller parts: the twigs on the outside of the branches AND the bottom of the trunk( less than 2 inches) I spray them all with blackboardpaint- this is a matt paint and dries very fast!

Let it dry and after that I take the same latexwallpaint as used before to color the frame.
I drybrush ( sometimes twice to get a maximum result)the bottom of the trunk that was painted/sprayed black . I use a short haired wide brush and brush carefully over the elevations of the black colered rough sawdust.
Than I add the black lines and spots on the trunk and branches with a marker or a small longhaired brush with black watercoloror ink.


hope to explain tomorrow how I make the foliage out of fibers...finaly!

Jos



Edited by - scotchpine on 09/13/2011 5:08:18 PM

Country: Netherlands | Posts: 332 Go to Top of Page

Bbags
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/20/2008 :  9:11:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wickman


Great how to.I wander if this will get transfered over to the Scenery thread for ease of future reference?
Just wandering as I right up the shopping list, what gauge of wire do the mm sizes convert to?



Lynn,
I will definitely put a few pictures and a link to this thread over in the Scenery thread for there is a lot of very valuable information that has been presented here.

That said since birches and cottonwood trees are 2 of the more common trees found in the area I model I have also copied this information for future use as I try to make my trees.
If mine look just half as good as these I will be a very happy modeler.



John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

Country: USA | Posts: 13250 Go to Top of Page
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