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Author Previous Topic: Looking for this roller set for Cobble Stone Topic Next Topic: All Scale Rails Issue #26 2021
Page: of 87

Grubes
Crew Chief



Posted - 11/28/2020 :  11:12:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Definitely an upgrade. Looks good.



Country: USA | Posts: 630 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/28/2020 :  12:57:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've broken A Lot Fewer drill bits doing grabirons through 3 related idea:
1. I buy the more expensive Gyros drill bits (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SKT9KO)
2. I'm using a low speed rechargable battery screwdriver (similar to this one: https://www.amazon.com/BLACK-DECKER-BDCS20C-Lithium-Ion-Rechargeable/dp/B00TM2T9C2) and the MicroMark hex shank micro drill chucks (https://www.micromark.com/Precision-Micro-Drill-Chuck-for-Cordless-Screwdriver ). I buy the chucks "in bulk" so I have the most common drill sizes each permanently chucked into one of these.
3. Before drilling, and occasionally during drilling, I poke the drill bit into beeswax

It used to be I'd break on average 3 drill bits per Westerfield kit (the resin they use is pretty tough). Now I usually finish the full kit without breaking the drill bit (but they do get dull, so I have to replace the drill bit. I try to keep at least 3 bits of the most common size on hand, so if I break 1, I'm not screwed for finishing a project...)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/28/2020 12:58:50 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 8977 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/05/2020 :  7:40:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Belated thanks, Dave, Dave, Chuck and Pete. Pete, so far converting to metal wheels hasn't come to the top of my priority list. One contributor is that I've had two cars with metal wheels put out of service by DCC shorts across gaps. Both were passenger cars with non-run-of-the-mill trucks. The other reason is, with only about 90 freight and only 25% of them making even one trip around the main line in an Op Session, I just don't get much wear on them.

It's been more than 2 months since my last post, and 2 months between that and the one before it. Almost no modeling in this half of the year. Some of that was navigating the virus crisis for me and my family, so far successfully. Some was the election, and preparations for the other outcome (extended visit with family where the government understands public health and respects science). But most was more than 80 days at Seashore Trolley Museum, working on full-size railroad track:



Seashore's Shop yard during removal of gauge rods applied as temporary remedies for various ills.



Pettibone MK-36 crane ready to lift the northerly turnout panel.



Southerly turnout in place with ties to connect it to our Main Line.



Bending 85 lb. by hand is a slow process and experience is important to getting a good result.



Sawing 85 lb. involves a strong back and much more adrenaline.



Maine's Track Laying Season is pretty much finished. But our work stood its first test: Our Pettibone Speed Swing brought in the second round of ballast.

I expect there will be more modeling in December and January than there was all Summer and Fall.


James

Edited by - jbvb on 12/06/2020 1:26:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/05/2020 :  7:50:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking Good, James! I don't see that NMRA gage anywhere, though.... Not sure that's gonna get you your Civil Engineer certificate....

Thanks for helping make that Museum a good one. Looking forward to getting out there for a ride or three. And some research.

Pete
in Michigan




Country: USA | Posts: 7575 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/05/2020 :  8:13:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James says that next time they'll solicit donations to pay for the shipping to get some FastTracks templates...

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8977 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2020 :  09:22:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow, that's the most realistic people I have ever seen!


Edited by - Tyson Rayles on 12/06/2020 09:22:59 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 13457 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2020 :  10:45:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That 1:1 trackwork is far too labor intense for me. I'm sticking to 1:87.

George


Fly Army

Country: USA | Posts: 16944 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/06/2020 :  1:37:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Pete, left of the head of the person sawing rail you can see our Inspection Gauge on the ground. The NMRA might not approve it because it's purely measurement: gauge, flangeway and cross-level. The go/no-go function resides in the operator.

George, 1:1 track work is indeed labor-intensive. Since we got married, my wife's cooking had contributed to a few pounds. But they all left with this job, even Thanksgiving's extras...


James

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/16/2020 :  10:53:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I started 34 Winter St. (my childhood friend Mike's house) in 2013 (page 20). It became 3-dimensional in 2014 (p 30). Then it sat as I thought about how to do the asbestos cement shingle sheathing. This past April (p. 80) I did the roof and started applying paper self-adhesive shingles, but the results didn't satisfy me (or at least, the AP evaluators I had hoped to show it to).

Now that the 1:1 track work season is over, I decided that the layout needed Mike's house regardless of the AP program. So I sat down last night and got it to this stage:





The corners are rough, but they lie down for a while when I rub them with my fingers. I'm hoping I can hold them flat with a fairly heavy coat of an appropriate gray (probably E-L) and then go on with windows, gutters etc.


James

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/17/2020 :  10:38:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I always hated Insulbrick, but I think your approach captures it quite well. It'll be interesting to see once painted. Perhaps some stippling with chalks will add that texture that I remember.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8977 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/17/2020 :  10:50:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
34 Winter is covered with BEST's #3028 Self Adhesive Laser Cut Shingles "Asbestos - Natural". No color applied yet. I have another scratchbuilt structure I'll do in Clever Models 'Insulbrick' but I haven't gotten beyond its foundation.

James

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/17/2020 :  11:40:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Coating the building with Insulbrick was, as I understand it, like coating it with gasoline and waiting. Just waiting....

I like the way this is coming together, James. Keep going!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7575 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/27/2020 :  11:33:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Pete. Airbrushing weather shifted my focus a bit. The Tichy NYC USRA rebuild (#4028D) is now waiting for the paint smell to dissipate:



This image is a Digikam/Enfuse focus stack experiment. I blended 4 images shot using a tripod but with different focus points. I like the fence being in focus. I don't like the halo around the CN boxcar's lettering. I spent a while browsing the web to get this far, I will look further.


James

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/02/2021 :  10:49:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Last week I spent some time on my Winter St. houses:



I tried Scalecoat Flat Grime for 28 Winter's lead flashing; better than BEST's shiny aluminum for my era, but needs a touch of gray. 32 Winter got a coat of Scalecoat E-L Light Gray which looked too dark. I went over it with a thin white wash and like the result. But neither made the shingles lay down enough to earn many 'Construction' points.

Windows await Northeastern Scale Lumber coming back from their 'inventory' and shipping my order. I only want some open, not most.



James

Edited by - jbvb on 01/02/2021 10:51:06 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6906 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/03/2021 :  08:40:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Houses are looking good!


Country: USA | Posts: 13457 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 87 Previous Topic: Looking for this roller set for Cobble Stone Topic Next Topic: All Scale Rails Issue #26 2021  
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