Railroad Line Forums - B&M Eastern Route progress
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 3 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 99 ]  [ Total: 102 ]  [ Newest Member: bogeycat99 ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mid Scale Model Railroad Forum
 B&M Eastern Route progress
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: MTH Repair Service - A Misnomer? Topic Next Topic: My Mechanical Adventures in HO Scale Motive Power
Page: of 61

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/07/2013 :  9:41:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rich, I know the southern portion of your area fairly well - I commuted to work in Billerica and Lowell Yard in 1977, and to Winchester and Woburn in 1980/81. When I get around to scanning my sketch of Lowell from the passenger station to the Bleachery for the Unofficial B&M Page, I'll mention it here and on BM_RR@yahoogroups.com.


Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2013 :  11:29:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Shortly after my last post, my main PC's motherboard gave up the ghost. I don't expect any data loss, but due to the season, what I decided to replace it with is taking a while to arrive. So I just finished getting things in place to post pictures from my throwaway Windows box:



My first real resin structure kit is Sylvan's HO-1042 "Barn with Silos". It's intended for Gilbert Rice's farm, between Rt. 1A and Little River. As such, it will be a bit out of date but well maintained.



The castings have nice detail and no bubbles, which you won't see till I post painted pictures. This window started out with mullions for 6 panes, but the flash was thick on this side and I damaged the mullions beyond repair. I've since installed a single styrene mullion to look like a later 2 pane replacement.

As with other resin items I've worked with, dimensions are a bit squishy. Once I got the walls and ends square, I found that the ends only fit the stone foundation one way, and that one of the sides was half a board short. I didn't contact Sylvan, because fixing it myself was less effort than trying to get replacement bits through US Customs. You can see the .188 x .100 styrene brace I used in that corner. I've since installed a filler board made of .040 styrene offcut.



Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 12/22/2013 :  1:01:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
How about sanding down the thickness of the foundation building mounting area? Sanding that down may pull in the building more square. Its a bit more work but might be worth it.

Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2013 :  1:23:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You don't want the foundation to stick out, the wood should actually overhang the stone. (Think about water running off the siding, you don't want that sitting on or crawling underneath the joint between walls and foundation...)

So I'd suggest splicing in a piece of styrene to make the walls longer.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6491 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2013 :  1:54:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill and Dave, thanks for looking in. Bill, I did in fact file a little off the flange atop the stone foundation wall for the final fit, but it would have been pretty thin had I taken enough off to compensate for this shrinkage. I've lived with old sills for most of my life, so I know exactly where Dave is coming from.


Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  1:13:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A picture of the Sylvan barn with the roof on and entrance ramp assembled:



The barn's roof overhang is bigger than usual for New England, but not a real outlier. Scalecoat "Graphite & Oil" and ancient Floquil Boxcar Red from a can stuck to the resin pretty well, but I did make a few chips cleaning up visible ACC blobs, so take care.

The silo is finished per the instructions using Floquil Concrete. I've never owned or worked in a silo, but I'm pretty sure that Harvestore and other mechanical top unloaders didn't exist when this style was current. Anyone know how they did it, and what I should add to the model?



And here's the Rice farm with some more grass and a dirt driveway. The house is Mt. Blue Models' "Post-1850 Farmhouse". Next is to level/gravel the farmyard and embed the foundations in the scenery (removably, I hope).




Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/23/2013 :  1:21:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,

'Burbs kid that I am, this looks good to me. Keep going!

The chipping paint concerns me, though. Did you clean the resin before you painted it? If not, the paint won't stick to the resin. Don't ask how I know this.

I also think that the Family Rice would like some steps on that back door, so I presume they're in the cards.

And as to the silos, I'm a 'burbs kid, so I have no clue.

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5520 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  1:33:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Pete. I scrubbed the resin with an old toothbrush, dish detergent & warm water (not hot, this resin starts to move at about 100F). Sylvan's instructions recommended their resin prep, or Dio-Sol, which is now scarcer than hen's teeth. The chipping was only where I was scraping ACC blobs off the roof seam, so I have hopes of future stability. Steps etc. are in the works, though I'm thinking Gilbert wouldn't have used anything fancier than fieldstone for the door away from the barnyard.


Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/23/2013 :  1:56:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ive had very good luck with "Super Clean" - purple jug in the automotive cleaner section at Wal-Mart. Cut to 10% solution. And I use a $1 battery powered toothbrush to help get the solution into the corners and crevasses on castings.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6491 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/23/2013 :  2:10:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Goo Gone also works well for cleaning the resin, although I can't remember whether it's the orange or the yellow stuff that you want. One leaves its own residue, one comes clean. Senior moment here....

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5520 Go to Top of Page

grlakeslogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/24/2013 :  02:03:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, you had written:
"I've never owned or worked in a silo, but I'm pretty sure that Harvestore and other mechanical top unloaders didn't exist when this style was current. Anyone know how they did it, and what I should add to the model?"

I live in dairy farm country in Wisconsin. They used a long auger to load the silage up to the top of the silo. The auger was only wheeled into place when silage was being made. The silage then fell downwards inside the silo. The silo was open to the inside lowermost level of the barn, where the cows were kept and fed. Incidentally, the entire silo below the formed metal dome top was concrete on one of these. That includes that far left portion you have painted red. That vertical shaft housed iron ladder rungs so the farmer could climb up the outside tunnel-like shaft to get above the silage.


--Stu--
It's a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

Country: USA | Posts: 870 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/24/2013 :  07:32:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Stu. I think Sylvan's prototype had a wood vertical ladderway; it's molded in 3 parts with horizontal boards and vertical trim. I followed the instructions when I painted it like the barn's wood. They included two side walls and a flat roof for a shed to connect the silo to the barn, which they said to paint as concrete if it was used. It has a notch in the roof for the ladderway, which they call a 'chute'. I'll have to adjust the ground level for it. Knowing about the auger is helpful: it gives me a lot more flexibility in placing the silo - I had thought I had to make sure Mr. Rice could park a silage chopper/blower under the chute.

Does this barn look like the cows were kept in the cellar, and the main floor was for hay? The cellar has a lot more windows and doors than old barns in my part of NH. My grandfather's barn had a wood silo whose base was well below the main floor of the barn where the cows were kept. The open side of the foundation faced away from the barn. Hay went in the loft, which was only about 6' above the main floor. Manure went down hatches into the cellar, where a spreader could be brought in and loaded. I've only the silo foundation to go by since my mother passed, but I guess he unloaded the last few tons of silage, or maybe all of it, into a wheelbarrow or sled and brought it around and in. He only had six milkers.



Country: USA | Posts: 5254 Go to Top of Page

bxcarmike
Crew Chief



Posted - 12/24/2013 :  10:51:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
On barns here in upstate New York, the lower level is for livestock, if it's a dairy, there's usually a small room off to one side or end where the milk is stored, either canned or bulk. On the barn I used for my livestock, the covered ladder side was next to the barn with a small shed-like addition connecting to the barn. I'd climb into the silo(wooden) and shovel down silage , usually corn. As the silage lowered, I'd remove a ladder section until it was ground level. The lower level would have stalls, either larger pen like or individual stanchions, where cows would be kept in, used primarily for milking. Some barns also had gutters in the lower floor for manure removal, some gutters had conveyors to remove to an outside place where the manure spreader parked.
Upper levels are for baled hay mostly, and occasionally a hay wagon, pick up truck or even a smaller tractor. Nice scene so far, Merry Christmas mh



Edited by - bxcarmike on 12/24/2013 10:54:30 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 555 Go to Top of Page

grlakeslogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 12/24/2013 :  3:04:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, what bxcarmike describes was common around here too. Here, the majority of barns had concrete around the ladder ways, but there were a few wooden ones too, like your model.
I do not recall when blowers became common. What I described earlier was based on memories from my elementary school years. Many of my childhood buddies were farm kids, and I thought farms were great places to play then.
The small shed you described definitely had concrete walls, because it had to be strong enough to withstand the force of the whole column of silage in the silo when full. The lower level here usually had stanchions. Cows wore numbered ear tags, and, somehow, each cow got into its own stanchion at feeding time. They were fed and milked twice a day. Long ago, that all happened in their stanchions. Sometimes, to maximize milk production, nutrients or medicines had to be added to a particular animal's feed. That's in part why the stanchions and ear tags. Later, milking happened in a "milking parlor" a separate, sanitary addition to the barn. Otherwise, both hay and straw went up in the wooden portion of the barn.
In addition, a visible detail you might add are about four lightning rods along the peak of the barn's roof. Those were common here too.
Oh, almost forgot ... when weather permitted, cows were given free access to the barnyard outside. In good weather, they were pastured much of the day. They were not always in the barn.


--Stu--
It's a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

Country: USA | Posts: 870 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/24/2013 :  4:34:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The scene's shaping very nicely!

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12475 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 61 Previous Topic: MTH Repair Service - A Misnomer? Topic Next Topic: My Mechanical Adventures in HO Scale Motive Power  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-17 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.53 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000