Railroad Line Forums - B&M Eastern Route progress
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 4 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 59 ]  [ Total: 63 ]  [ Newest Member: petese505 ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Mid Scale Model Railroad Forum
 B&M Eastern Route progress
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Topic Next Topic: Alco Models HO scale T-3 electric locomotive
Page: of 60

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 07/09/2013 :  10:26:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,

This looks good so far. I like the corrugated strip at the top and am interested in your choice of "reds" for the color. Whatever is on the photo looks pretty "chalked out" to me, and I still haven't found a good color match.

I agree with your statement about wanting the railroad to look good and operate well; I should post that where I can see it. It might get me off the computer and on to the layout!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5357 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/14/2013 :  4:30:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Pete. I've seen some nice photos of your work, but the last thread I recall you starting was the one about Gatorboard. I hope not all your time goes to virtual modeling...

Regarding the chalky red, the shed was at best a few years old at the early end of my 1955 - 1965 modeling era. I plan to try a can of ancient Floquil Caboose Red which is much closer to Tuscan than current production (no help to anyone following along, though).

Then I took a detour and photographed the underside: The exterior corrugated metal has been repainted at least once, but the protected parts apparently haven't been:



I found some only-a-little-oversize corrugated-both-sides styrene from JTT Architectural Models at The Hobby Bunker in Malden, MA (war gaming, auto & military models) and decided to do a fairly accurate underside, even if nobody will ever see it. So this is stalled till I can buy another pack of 12 inch (0.125) I-beam and some ~7 inch (.080) H column Monday.

I went back to my Hobbytown RS-3 project (which happens to be spread out in my much cooler living room):



I ordered NS wheels from NWSL before I took an axle assembly entirely apart: Observe wheel with 3/32" bore & 1/16" shouldered axle end. I'd waited quite a while for unmounted wheels, so I decided bushing the bores down would be faster than ordering the right wheels. K&S 3/32" brass tube was a tight press fit in the wheel, but loose on the axle. I heated it red hot to soften it, then pressing it in made it a so-so slip fit on the axle. After soldering and reassembly, a couple of wheels are maybe .002 out of true, which works OK with my track. Still, not the recommended approach.



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/16/2013 :  11:24:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
As late afternoon sun glints off the nose of a Portland-bound E-7, extra 1538 West (a job known as The Camel) waits on the yard ladder. When the varnish is clear, she'll double her train together and begin the final leg of today's two Mystic Jct. - Bexley round-trips.



1538 won't really be finished till the headlights are installed, but the cosmetic work is done. Unless I decide to adjust one of the cab windows. This job has greatly increased my respect for people who hand-fit windows - accurate laser-cut parts would have saved me about 2 hours of filing and trying and filing...

And of course there's work to be done on the building flats. The new one with nice window detailing is my friend Ron G's work.



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/28/2013 :  9:54:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm stalled on Hytron (airbrushing time) and my Hobbytown RS-3 (electronic parts), so I decided to do something about the above scene.



I built the left flat from DPM modulars a while back, I just built the middle one from a mix of Walthers & DPM parts, and Ron G. gave me the one on the right. They're mounted to the backdrop, which got black paint where needed and my flats are ready for windows. But first I'll finish the foundations and add trees & shrubs.



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/04/2013 :  10:38:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
All my modeling time this past week has gone into scenery around Maxwell Sq. (over the Bexley Tunnel). The Engine Terminal (E) portal area is the more photogenic at this point:



Based on prototypes around Boston, I decided that I needed an employees' shortcut between the residential area and the yard:



I started with CV stair moldings and added a platform with rail. .080 square posts, 'car siding' deck, 2x4 bracing & railing.

Next, I need to work out how to model the two signal/telephone cables that would have been hung on cleats mounted on the retaining wall. I don't think I'll try doing the separate carrier wire and suspension loops the prototype used, as this is fairly far from viewers.




Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 08/05/2013 :  3:47:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Nice addition. And the RR would have done that to.

Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/06/2013 :  10:52:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Bill. Last night's project was placing some trees, Woodland Scenics fiber grass and Noch grass tufts here and there. Then I decided to mop my attic's linoleum floor in honor of potential company. Ron G. wound up not being able to make it over tonight, but I'm enjoying how much better it looks. This morning I shifted to completing an old NPP brass NYO&W coach as a B&M 4500 series car. Windows cut and one side decaled. I need more acrylic solvent cement before I can get back to Hytron, and a bit more thought about fences & structures before I do much more to Bexley.

Now a bit of hot air while waiting for the decals to dry: Some of my posts here are journaling; I make notes to myself so I'll be able to retrieve some fact, or understand how I did something years later. Some are for others, interesting prototypes, useful techniques, some are so my friends can see what I'm doing without making the trek to the New Hampshire seacoast.

I just spent a little while browsing through the sticky thread with pointers to people's layouts ( http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22370 ). Some threads don't progress much, some are cut off by life issues, some continue. I looked up a few authors to see if they're still active. I wish all of you enjoyment; I'm plugging along on my own motivation, but this site, the magazines I get and the Hub Division are important sources of encouragement. I respect those of you who build dioramas, but I don't always look in on your work, lest I overwhelm myself with wanting your craftsmanship over my whole 240 sq. ft. of benchwork and 75 - 100 structures. I understand that all the active members are looking for community and encouragement, so I will do my best to hold up my end.



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2013 :  09:14:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good!

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12330 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/11/2013 :  10:53:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike. I was away for the past few days, but this morning I got to work on the enginehouse end of the tunnel. But once I had the portal built, I looked in the other end and realized with the lining I'd installed last week, I was pretty close to a nice photo from the west end.



New England still has quite a few of these short cut-and-cover 'arches' or 'tunnels'. There are a number of published photos in the same vein. Exposure was 1 sec. at f/40 with only room lighting. When I re-shoot, I'll try a longer focal length lens and place the camera a little farther away.

The railing over the portal is .025 brass wire, the right retaining wall is wood putty, painted black and carved through for the mortar lines. And of course, the photo reveals a little more to be done.



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/11/2013 :  11:17:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,

I like the tunnel shot! Interesting angle, and a cool subject; your plans for a re-shoot should make for an interesting comparison.

What is the stone used for the retaining walls? I have a lot of B&M/New England "picture books" with shots of retaining walls in this configuration -- black stone and tan mortar. The coloring of the stone is so complete and uniform that I have a hard time believing it's simply dirt/coal dust, and the material seems to be ubiquitous. Thoughts?

Thanks.

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5357 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/11/2013 :  11:56:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Pete, I've watched the black color weather off the stone over the years, especially near the coast. In and around Newburyport, it's almost all visibly gray granite now: This is visible in my Merrimack St. bridge thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=29435

Inland, the black color persists; these photos of the Dover & Greenfield arches were taken in the past 10 years: http://www.faracresfarm.com/jbvb/rr/arches.html

I can't imagine the B&M or any of the other RRs where this is found painting the stone, neatly skipping the mortar. Neither can I imagine paint of the 1950s lasting 50 years on exposed rock surfaces. So it has to be some combination of coal soot and steam oil condensate.



Edited by - jbvb on 08/11/2013 11:59:20 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/11/2013 :  2:23:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

Pete, I've watched the black color weather off the stone over the years, especially near the coast. In and around Newburyport, it's almost all visibly gray granite now: This is visible in my Merrimack St. bridge thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=29435

Inland, the black color persists; these photos of the Dover & Greenfield arches were taken in the past 10 years: http://www.faracresfarm.com/jbvb/rr/arches.html

I can't imagine the B&M or any of the other RRs where this is found painting the stone, neatly skipping the mortar. Neither can I imagine paint of the 1950s lasting 50 years on exposed rock surfaces. So it has to be some combination of coal soot and steam oil condensate.



OK, I can be convinced. Steam, soot and steam oil condensate it is. Thanks.

I'll try hard to remember this analysis, too!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5357 Go to Top of Page

nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 08/13/2013 :  11:06:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
A lot of Brownstone was brown to tan hues to begin with. Over time, steam oil, soot, environmental conditions, mold and vegetation make rock surfaces darken. Mortar 'pops' when it becomes darker. The part of the country it was constructed in has a lot to do with it also. Brownstone, even in cities, weathers differently in different parts of a city if it closer to the industrial areas. If it was built in the country away from the city they tend to weather more subtly, meaning the remain lighter brown hues. New England Brownstone has a nice clinic on how to do it with paints and washes. Plaster looks more like stone when colored. Why? because its flat.

This is my opinion: As long as it is painted a 'flat' color it will look right. Most things in the environment are flat with a few exceptions. The exceptions are mostly humans. Humans like shiny things. Cars, trucks, boats, fashion wear, paint, polished granite counter tops, passenger cars, newly painted steam and diesel engines, etc... Flat things that look glossy are usually wet.


Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Edited by - nhguy on 08/13/2013 11:25:26 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/13/2013 :  11:13:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A lot of rocks will change color when exposed to the atmosphere (without any help from man-made sources.) I think that's particularly true of limestone.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6293 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/22/2013 :  08:42:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill, you're right about 'flat'. I was trying to bind the scenery by the portal with hair spray, and it left a sheen which I need to get rid of. Dave, no limestone in these parts, almost all metamorphic rocks. AFAIK I'd have to go maybe 100 miles to see sedimentary.

I've been away from home a good deal recently, and I haven't found a store that stocks 3' lengths of K&S brass wire, so no additional railings. But I did get a package:



Forum member Wallace S. said he would post about this project, so all I'll say is 'Thank you very much'. I'm very happy to be running DC trains a la Linn Westcott, with a realistic brake. And yes, I'm going to build a little insulated box for the Kadee brush to sit in, lest it short against the throttle case.



I'm using it as the 3rd throttle, for local switching in West Lynn and GE's River Works. To get it out of the way when idle, I built a simple slide-out shelf using mostly scrap I could lay hands on at 9PM.



A "True Action Throttle", of which this is a variant, really benefits from a voltmeter to adjust starting voltage etc. To keep the wiring simple, I connected it to the 'Loop' output, which I'm not using otherwise.

I also decided to paint the shelf the same blue as my other control panels. This is from my UI design work; it should help visiting operators spot it ('this blue means electrical controls').



Country: USA | Posts: 5145 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 60 Topic Next Topic: Alco Models HO scale T-3 electric locomotive  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-17 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.52 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000