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Author Topic Next Topic: West Allen Street and Thawne
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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 04/19/2013 :  07:56:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I hear you, Marty. At the old TMRC (MIT) club layout, I would sometimes run unrealistic 75-car freights led by a Cary/Hobbytown E-7 with 1538 midtrain at the 60 car point. Went right up the 2% grade with 36" radius curve at the bottom. I could pick up a milk car in 15 fast-clock minutes, without banging it around either. But the other members still said "grind me up a pound".

Last night I rewired my block busses to all 5 control panels. I had originally put the DC mainline cab in the leftmost position on the rotary block switches, with Local straight up (next position) and DCC 45 deg. right. I did this because the DC metering was to the left of the DCC master. But when I started playing around with operations, I didn't like moving through the DCC position every time I turned a block off, or switched it to Remote (all the way right). So I put the DCC at 45 deg. left and the DC Train Engineer at 45 deg. right. Then I ran a few trains, shaking down equipment and just for fun.

Now I need to do some bartering with someone who can debug analog solid state stuff better than I can - I really want a DC throttle with a brake lever. I've acquired two over the years, an MRC handheld and an old Heathkit TAT-V clone console unit. Neither works. But I can trade track/equipment/painting for help here.



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 04/30/2013 :  8:28:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've done very little modeling in the past week; work, protecting my orchard from Cedar Apple Rust, comforting Jane and her poor cancer victim cat, who's departing tomorrow. At least the weather is nice, and I've got parts on order or on hand for several projects.

This picture arose from a comment on the Nantahala Midland thread, asking "where were the cow flops" in Tyson Rayles' pasture.



Being a former cattle owner, I thought a bit and decided a simple blob of Raw Umber artist's acrylic paint might meet the need. Two are visible in the cow pasture on the right - they take a day or so to dry completely. I'm hoping they're tough enough to stand up to all the hands (one cow recently lost a leg), but we'll see this Fall.

I'm thinking about how to model one of those rings of rank green grass around a bare spot which you also see in cow pastures. Possibly that will be my excuse to buy/build a static grass applicator.

1706 is an Athearn Genesis lightly airbrush weathered. I didn't want to post a picture which was just model cow pies, lest it show up later when someone wants to embarrass me



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

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Posted - 04/30/2013 :  8:47:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
"they take a day or so to dry completely"

So do the real ones!


Nicely done.


Mike

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Red P
Fireman



Posted - 05/01/2013 :  12:03:33 PM  Show Profile  Send Red P a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Just as long as you dont duplicate the smell.
P


https://www.flickr.com/photos/eightnotch/

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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/03/2013 :  07:54:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The other day, Dave (kot2b) asked for advice on fitting a pilot coupler to an Overland B&M G-11 0-6-0. Mine had never been run, so I got it out:



I did the pilot fairly simply - use the hole on the top of the pocket as a guide for drilling through #65, cut down a McHenry (no plastic Kadees handy), mark & drill the shank #75 and pin it in place with a Perfect "#8 modeling pin". A shirt pin would have worked, just more excess length to cut off.



The tender required more effort: First, Cheyenne had not included screws for the mounting pad. Experimentation showed it was 1.4mm metric thread, and NWSL 6mm screws would hold a Kadee box. But then it was low. I didn't want to make pickup worse by using a fiber washer, so I made metal washers from .015 nickel silver sheet using a Micro-Mark punch/die set (left, above the spring, washer & screw). The 3/32" die made a hole that fit the kingpin screw. I also cut one kingpin spring in half and stretched it a bit for more flexibility.

Then there were a couple of hitches in the mechanism. I traced one to the left crosshead/piston assembly hanging up on something inside the cylinder bore. I tightened up the crosshead guides with gentle application of pliers, then ran a #51 drill into the cylinder and finished by rounding the ends of both piston rods.

The next was the connecting rod screw on the front driver catching the crosshead. This was cured by carefully adjusting the position of the cylinder/crosshead assembly relative to the frame.

I only ran it around the layout for a bit - it was late. Appears to be rated for about 12 cars (same as the Atlas HH-660 I just got). The boiler has a weight installed, there isn't room for a lot more.



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/09/2013 :  12:09:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The other night I did a partial dry run of an operating session: I ran the 'Casco', a Providence - Portland time freight, the Newburyport Local (until I get more track built, there isn't room to get a Portsmouth Local entirely in the clear at Newburyport) and three local passenger trains. This turned up some problems, but generally it went smoothly and I had fun switching. It was too late to slow it down with picture taking, though. Maybe this weekend.



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/12/2013 :  08:42:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I don't expect this situation is common in other layouts, but the corners of mine must leave clearance for me to get at the attic windows. West Lynn is the lowest part of the layout, so I've got about 30 inches of flying plywood with no fascia. Vehicles needed access to the West Lynn public delivery tracks, thus Bennett St.:



Micro-Engineering 30' girders, with the middle one cut in half so it fits in a slot I sawed in the Homasote.



I undercut the plywood with a coping saw and painted it black. The girders are taped in place till I airbrush them.

In other progress, I replaced a broken axle gear in P1K RS-2 1501 and it runs nicely again. Non-progress was finding out that modern 'lacquer thinner' will only make the coating on a 20 year old brass tender bubble, though it worked on the boiler/cab. I have commercial stripper on hand, but I'm going to research things I can get by the gallon locally.



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/13/2013 :  7:33:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
As I don't find it in a simple web search, let it be known that the old Anderson (or Eshleman) "Turnout Link" has an 0-80 thread in the top arm (the one that screws into the throwbar). Flathead screws improve the clearance relative to the supplied hex-heads.


Edited by - jbvb on 05/13/2013 7:34:41 PM

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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/19/2013 :  7:00:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This weekend's work was mostly on the High St. overpass:



I'd made the roadway 30 scale feet wide, but that wasn't going to look right after allowing for sidewalks. So I shimmed the abutments out 6' with foam core. I got a pretty good start on the bridge and retaining walls too - I hot-glued fiberglass screen to support a coat of wood putty which I'll paint & carve like the retaining walls around Merrimack St.



Finally, I made a try at coloring the brown fake fur for the Little River marshes:



This is mostly Pthalo Green artist's acrylic, with a little Green Gold. When I wrung out the water most of the color went with it . I reapplied and it's air drying (slowly, it got cloudy & cool after I took the picture).



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/21/2013 :  07:33:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The High St. overpass dates to the 1920s, when an earlier gauntlet-track 'arch' was widened to 3 tracks and made strong enough to carry a trolley line.



I have tree-free pictures (which I could have taken in the '70s, but didn't), but they're copyright the Walker Transportation Collection.



I had to compress both the width and the depth, so there's space for longitudinal girders but no room for water lines etc. I used half a package of .015 x .100 getting to this point last night.

My first try at marsh grass didn't have enough green, though I like the texture and color variation. I'll try applying more when I see a good drying day in the forecast.



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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 05/21/2013 :  8:40:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This is how the ~80 year old concrete has looked for most of my life:



I've been thinking about the Rustoleum "American Stone" that Elliot Moore (ETinBH) showed, with a light overcoat or wash of a more sandy color. Assuming I can find it, and I'm not otherwise too annoyed at RPM/Rustoleum, and that the assembled wisdom doesn't advise me against using it on a styrene base?

I need a little surface roughness, but maybe about 200 grit, not 60 grit. I might be able to get the effect by simply airbrushing it from too far away, with too much air pressure, but that's chancy.



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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/02/2013 :  08:35:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Another "so a search will find it" post: My Overland 3899 HO brass model of the B&M's C-100 - C-137 cabooses came with wheels that intermittently shorted against the sideframes - not bad enough to bother my DC locos, but unhappy-making for DCC. The problem was the axles were too short (or the holes in the sideframes too big). Reboxx 33-1-0.995 replacement wheels cured the short and made it roll beautifully. My trackwork is OK for .088 width wheels.


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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 06/02/2013 :  11:17:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi James, I'm just catching up on your recent developments trackside. Love the idea of the cows out in their pasture doing what cows do best! Ha! I also love the McGinnis Bluebird scheme on the GP9's. I had two locomotives painted in these colours a long time ago and they remain two of my favourite locomotives. Looks like Athearn did a really nice job on them! I also really like that roadway underpass. I'm looking forward to seeing it completed on your layout!

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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jbvb
Fireman

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Posted - 06/05/2013 :  07:56:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike. I brush-painted a couple of Athearn blue-box GP-9s in McGinnis blue, and added a Hobbytown drive to one back in my High School years. I should figure out where they are one of these days.

Last night's progress included re-cutting rail gaps (not photogenic), a try to improve the color of my fake fur marsh grass for Little River (not dry yet) and adding concrete sidewalks to the High St. overpass.



I scribed joint lines in .040 styrene and glued it to the parapets. I used a pencil to make a guideline so the sidewalk curves to match the road. The west (longer) side doesn't have its curb yet.



This test shot is for comparison with a prototype photo from 1949. Close enough to be recognizable, but not exact...
[edit: fixed a typo]



Edited by - jbvb on 06/06/2013 10:18:17 PM

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jatravia
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/05/2013 :  09:49:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,

Nice looking bridge. Styrene is such a nice material to work with. I look forward to seeing your progress.

Joe <><



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