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Author Previous Topic: Members Prototype Photos Topic Next Topic: The Gallery: Nov. 18 Interior Decoration Pt. 3
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joakleaf
Engine Wiper

Supporting Member

Posted - 05/28/2008 :  5:19:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the posts - I particularly like the wooden gin structure.


Country: USA | Posts: 256 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2008 :  2:50:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anyone who has been following along in these Prototype Structure threads knows that I have a soft spot for barns. I especially like the unique little barns that the small farmer had up here in the hilly areas of New Jersey. Here is one I came across a week or so ago. It is right along the side of the road. The road itself is on a hill, and the ground also slopes off gently away from the road. This barn took advantage of both slopes.

The 'downhill side' of the barn.

Full view.



The 'drive under' Watch out if you open that door, the first step is a beaut!



The stone foundation.




Road side & downhill side of barn

Full view.



An interesting door. At one time it looked to be a double door. (There is a matching double door on the uphill side of the barn.) At some point did someone make that diagonal cut and have a smaller door only on one side?



Foundation detail.



Only a modeler would be interested in the rot.



Uphill side of the barn.

Full view.



Those uphill doors. Notice they used the natural slope of the hill to arrange a dirt ramp up into the barn.




Some corner rot.



Some corner rot.



Country: USA | Posts: 30836 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2008 :  5:08:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A great find, Bruce. The colors of the wood are wonderful.


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Peterpools
Engineer



Posted - 06/08/2008 :  6:00:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bruce
Nice set of detailed photos. I always appreciate the effort everyone goes through in posting prototype photos. Living here on the Island, the property and land is so valuable, structures get torn down way too fast.
Peter



Country: USA | Posts: 12335 Go to Top of Page

Chester
Fireman



Posted - 06/08/2008 :  8:14:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice find Bruce. Interesting study in rot and I love the red. I'd love to get my hands on all those old strap hinges.

http://modelingin1-87.blogspot.com/

Country: | Posts: 2710 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/08/2008 :  8:21:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That’s a very unique barn, Bruce. You have a good eye for interesting buildings.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14641 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 06/25/2008 :  6:18:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2577008038_af301e367f_b.jpg

This is a simple shed, but it has in interesting detail. Common thought is that a door should be hung so the diagonals are in compression (push) instead of tension (pull) like this one. So in case you run your diagonals this way, here is a
prototype pic to prove your case!






Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/25/2008 :  7:21:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Even if one does not build this barn, the study in wood and mason weathering makes this a very interesting set of pics. Thanks for taking the time to post them!.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7124 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/26/2008 :  03:45:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice picture, Chuck. Not being a doormaker myself, I had once built an outhouse door the wrong way, and I'm happy to have finally an answer to give to the laughers...


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

mabloodhound
Fireman



Posted - 07/05/2008 :  7:11:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Doan

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3051/2577008038_af301e367f_b.jpg

This is a simple shed, but it has in interesting detail. Common thought is that a door should be hung so the diagonals are in compression (push) instead of tension (pull) like this one. So in case you run your diagonals this way, here is a
prototype pic to prove your case!



Doors have been built both ways and being in the business for 40+ years I can tell you that the old school of carpenters were taught to run diagonals this way. The printed handbooks even described this. The theory was that the weight of the boards in the door would cause them to sag (by gravity) and with the diagonals under tension the diagonal would cause the individual boards to pull tighter together and thereby preventing or limiting the sag. As the boards got tighter together they acted as a solid unit. Now with todays plywood, the opposite would be true and diagonals can be set under compression.
Dave Mason


Dave Mason
D&G RR (Dunstead & Granford) in On30
“Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”~Benjamin Franklin
The 2nd Amendment, America’s 1st Homeland Security

Country: USA | Posts: 6655 Go to Top of Page

Chuck Doan
Fireman

Posted - 07/07/2008 :  3:12:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent info Dave! I have seen it done both ways, but I didn't know why. Thanks!


Edited by - Chuck Doan on 07/07/2008 3:14:29 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1559 Go to Top of Page

Ray46
Engine Wiper

Posted - 07/07/2008 :  4:41:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was in Montgomery, AL. this 4th of July and had a chance to do a little site-seeing and photography. First, I found this interesting structure in Wetumka, just northeast of Montgomery. It's the town's first jail. I didn't have anything to do a really accurate measurement, but the building is approximately 22'x18'




http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb167/rayw46/IMG_3365.jpg" border="0">






Ray




Country: USA | Posts: 259 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/07/2008 :  6:09:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A very train-y name, Calaboose. Was it built by Baldlawin?


Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

Danny Head
Fireman

Posted - 07/08/2008 :  08:30:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ray, that type of jail must have been common to that part of Alabama. There was a very simular jail in the town of Wadley. It had the jail (bars) door right out on the sidewalk. Danny


Country: USA | Posts: 1889 Go to Top of Page

Chester
Fireman



Posted - 07/13/2008 :  6:41:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is just an old barn with great weathering outside of Mexico, Maine. I only post it because the door is an excellent example of "Maine stain", used motor oil.



http://modelingin1-87.blogspot.com/

Country: | Posts: 2710 Go to Top of Page
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